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SPORTS
August 31, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The movement in major league baseball continued Sunday, with three pitchers changing teams. The Atlanta Braves traded veteran relief pitcher Gene Garber to the Kansas City Royals for a player to be named; the San Diego Padres sent Storm Davis to the Oakland Athletics for two players to be named,and the St. Louis Cardinals traded left-handed reliever Pat Perry to the Cincinnati Reds for a player to be named.
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NEWS
March 29, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH and JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A small boat carrying a nine-member scientific team from UC Davis sank in wind-driven seas in a remote Baja California bay, officials said Tuesday, leaving at least three dead. Two others, including a world-renowned scorpion expert, were missing. Mexican navy Capt. Elias Bonilla said from Ensenada on Tuesday night that fishermen had recovered three bodies. A U.S.
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SPORTS
December 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Kansas City Royals signed pitcher Storm Davis today, the Cleveland Indians signed free agent Keith Hernandez and the Montreal Expos picked up Dennis (Oil Can) Boyd. Davis, the third free agent lost by the Oakland A's at baseball's winter meetings, signed a three-year contract. He was 19-7 for the World Series champion A's last season but was unhappy that he was not used in the World Series and said he would look elsewhere after the season.
SPORTS
July 6, 1990
Relief ace Mark Davis, a Cy Young Award winner at San Diego last season but a major disappointment for Kansas City this year, is going to get a chance at starting. The Royals announced that Davis will start in Sunday's game with the Tigers, his first appearance as a starter since June 19, 1987, when he was with the San Francisco Giants. "It's an opportunity to get him some innings in a different role," said Manager John Wathan.
SPORTS
January 21, 1987 | TOM FRIEND
Pitcher Storm Davis, acquired in a trade last October with Baltimore, signed a one-year contract with the Padres that's expected to pay him in the neighborhood of $560,000 in 1987. Davis' signing Tuesday reduced to four the number of Padres seeking salary arbitration. Davis said he would have preferred a multiyear contract, "but one year's fine right now," he told Associated Press. He was reported to be seeking $615,000 after making $500,000 last year.
SPORTS
December 8, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE
Not much changed at baseball's winter meetings Thursday. There were no trades, only free-agent signings. And those signings made some otherwise average people rich: --The Kansas City Royals gave former Oakland A's pitcher Storm Davis $6 million for three years. --The Seattle Mariners gave former Cleveland Indian first baseman Pete O'Brien $7.6 million for four years. --Former Toronto Blue Jay outfielder Lloyd Moseby was signed by the Detroit Tigers for $3 million for two years.
SPORTS
April 2, 1987 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Pitcher Storm Davis hasn't exactly taken the Padres by storm this spring. In fact, he has caused Manager Larry Bowa's temper to flare on occasion. Davis, acquired in the off-season from Baltimore for catcher Terry Kennedy and minor league pitcher Mark Williamson, upset Bowa by being off his game again Wednesday. He allowed four runs (three earned) in three innings of relief as the Padres lost to the Angels, 5-3, for their fifth straight defeat.
SPORTS
October 31, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Thanks to LaMarr Hoyt, the San Diego Padres on Thursday traded catcher Terry Kennedy and a minor league pitcher to the Baltimore Orioles for pitcher Storm Davis. For two weeks, Jack McKeon, the Padre general manager, had been trying to complete a three-way deal: Kennedy to the Orioles for Davis, then Davis to the Philadelphia Phillies for outfielder Gary Redus and pitcher Charles Hudson. The Phillies hemmed and hawed and wanted to wait.
SPORTS
August 17, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Storm Davis did not let an emotional homecoming disrupt the hot streak he's on. Davis won his seventh consecutive decision as the Oakland Athletics beat the Baltimore Orioles, 6-3, Tuesday night at Baltimore. It was Davis' first start against the team he pitched for from 1982-86. "It was strange. I spent all day telling myself I could handle this," said Davis, who improved his record to 12-4 and did not allow any Orioles to second base until the sixth inning." . . .
SPORTS
October 6, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
He began his career uneasily in Baltimore in the early 1980s, billed as the next Jim Palmer, but today Storm Davis may be baseball's foremost example of what it means to be in the right place at the right time. In 1989, Davis started 31 games and completed only one. He worked a meager total of 169 1/3 innings, averaging fewer than six innings a start. He gave up 21 home runs. He had a 4.36 earned-run average. But he finished 19-7. You want luck? You want stupefyingly good fortune?
SPORTS
June 8, 1990
The Kansas City Royals put pitcher Storm Davis on the 15-day disabled list because of a bruised knuckle on his pitching hand.
SPORTS
December 8, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE
Not much changed at baseball's winter meetings Thursday. There were no trades, only free-agent signings. And those signings made some otherwise average people rich: --The Kansas City Royals gave former Oakland A's pitcher Storm Davis $6 million for three years. --The Seattle Mariners gave former Cleveland Indian first baseman Pete O'Brien $7.6 million for four years. --Former Toronto Blue Jay outfielder Lloyd Moseby was signed by the Detroit Tigers for $3 million for two years.
SPORTS
December 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Kansas City Royals signed pitcher Storm Davis today, the Cleveland Indians signed free agent Keith Hernandez and the Montreal Expos picked up Dennis (Oil Can) Boyd. Davis, the third free agent lost by the Oakland A's at baseball's winter meetings, signed a three-year contract. He was 19-7 for the World Series champion A's last season but was unhappy that he was not used in the World Series and said he would look elsewhere after the season.
SPORTS
October 6, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
He began his career uneasily in Baltimore in the early 1980s, billed as the next Jim Palmer, but today Storm Davis may be baseball's foremost example of what it means to be in the right place at the right time. In 1989, Davis started 31 games and completed only one. He worked a meager total of 169 1/3 innings, averaging fewer than six innings a start. He gave up 21 home runs. He had a 4.36 earned-run average. But he finished 19-7. You want luck? You want stupefyingly good fortune?
SPORTS
October 15, 1988 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
You will see him take the mound for the Oakland Athletics Sunday night to start Game 2 of the World Series, and you will wonder: Is this a pitcher or a piece of glassware? He will not stomp. He will not snarl. He will not write a libelous sports column. If the Dodgers place him in peril, he will exhibit all the panic of a sunbather. You will look at him twice and you will think, what a dumb nickname. George Earl (Storm) Davis. Right. Are you sure that's not Breeze Davis? Maybe Summer Day Davis.
SPORTS
October 15, 1988 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
You will see him take the mound for the Oakland Athletics Sunday night to start Game 2 of the World Series, and you will wonder: Is this a pitcher or a piece of glassware? He will not stomp. He will not snarl. He will not write a libelous sports column. If the Dodgers place him in peril, he will exhibit all the panic of a sunbather. You will look at him twice and you will think, what a dumb nickname. George Earl (Storm) Davis. Right. Are you sure that's not Breeze Davis? Maybe Summer Day Davis.
SPORTS
August 20, 1987 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Take one Storm Davis, a quietly competitive, sensitive, 25-year-old pitcher. Take one Larry Bowa and a Padre team that has adopted the manager's bark and bite and emotion. Put them together and . . . well, don't. An imperfect fit became even more strained Tuesday when Davis made an impromptu pregame announcement that he wished to be traded. On Wednesday, after he had stayed awake until 5:45 a.m. thinking about it, Davis explained why.
SPORTS
August 17, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Storm Davis did not let an emotional homecoming disrupt the hot streak he's on. Davis won his seventh consecutive decision as the Oakland Athletics beat the Baltimore Orioles, 6-3, Tuesday night at Baltimore. It was Davis' first start against the team he pitched for from 1982-86. "It was strange. I spent all day telling myself I could handle this," said Davis, who improved his record to 12-4 and did not allow any Orioles to second base until the sixth inning." . . .
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