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Storm Drains

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OPINION
May 23, 1999
The diversion plan for pollution runoff from the Santa Monica Bay is welcome (May 13), but the seven-year delay between the time voters approved funding and the actual commencement of the work is altogether unacceptable. If a diversion point could not be agreed upon, some objective outside group should have been brought in to get the job done. It's no wonder people have absolutely no confidence in government or the system. TOBI DRAGERT Winnetka
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Wait three days after it rains before going into the ocean. It's a warning that public health officials issued to beachgoers this week, as they do after any significant storm in California. But a study released Monday is raising questions about whether that three-day waiting period is enough to protect people who swim, surf and play in the ocean from pathogens in storm runoff that can make them ill. "To err on the side of caution, stay out of the water for five days after rainfall," said Amanda Griesbach, a water quality scientist at Heal the Bay , an environmental group that provided data and other support for the research by undergraduate students at the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
As rain falls on much of Los Angeles, the county's top health officer is warning beach-goers to beware of surfing, swimming "and playing in ocean waters around discharging storm drains, creeks and rivers. " The rain advisory is in effect for all c ounty beaches until Thursday at 7:30 a.m. but excludes beach areas apart from discharging storm drains, rivers and creeks.  “Fortunately, discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers only comprises a small portion of the beach, and therefore, anybody who wants to go to the beach will be able to enjoy their outing,” Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding said in a news release Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer, Bob Pool and Ari Bloomekatz
An overturned tanker truck carrying thousands of gallons of gas poured a "burning river of fuel" through storm drains in the Elysian Valley area Saturday, snarling traffic on the 5 Freeway near downtown for most of the day, officials said. Some of the burning fuel made its way into the L.A. River, setting the water aflame. Fire authorities said there were no injuries. The tanker was carrying 8,500 gallons of gasoline when it overturned at the junction of the 2 and 5 freeways north of downtown Saturday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1997
A damaged storm drain on Corporate Avenue between Progress Way and Camden Drive is going to get a $14,200 repair job. The City Council recently approved a contract for the renovation after Public Works Director Mark Christoffels reported on the urgency of the project. Four companies bid on the job. The council awarded the contract to the low bidder, Grbavac Construction Co. of Temple City. --BY JENNIFER LEUER MIMI KO CRUZ, LESLEY WRIGHT AND BILL BILLITER
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997 | DAVID R. BAKER
Hoping to keep small children out of the storm drains that line city streets, the City Council tonight will discuss adding metal bars to some of the drain openings. Half of the city's 533 drain openings, ranging in height from 5 to 11 inches, currently lack protective bars, a result of the different storm drain design guidelines the city has followed over the years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA
A storm drain project to help keep two private lakes clean would cost the city about $1.4 million, according to a report being considered tonight by the City Council. Even at that price, the project wouldn't completely alleviate the runoff problem into two lakes owned by the Lake Forest I and II homeowner associations, the engineering report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
The installation of a storm drain in Canoga Park to relieve flooding problems will begin in January, Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky's office has announced. The county Department of Public Works will install more than 3,000 feet of a storm drain system on Saticoy Street beginning at De Soto Avenue and continuing westward to Deering Avenue. The work will be done under a $575,009 contract awarded to Mladen Grbavac Construction Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has approved a $3.2-million contract to build a storm drain system along Platt Avenue north of Valley Circle Boulevard, Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky announced Wednesday. County officials will supervise the installation of 9,600 feet of storm drain on portions of Aetna Street, Kenwater Avenue, Calvert Street, Le Sage Avenue, Hatteras Street and Burbank Boulevard, Yaroslavsky said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Construction of a storm drain system along central roads in Hidden Hills is scheduled to begin Wednesday and continue through August. The project, administered by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, involves installing a 1,400-foot storm drain system along Round Meadow and Long Valley roads. "Construction of this drain work will help relieve the problem flooding we've experienced in this area," said Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky in a news release.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
Before Samuel Cifuentes walked out the door, his younger brother warned him about the storm bearing down on Oklahoma City. " Tené cuidado. Ya viene un tornado ," Byron Cifuentes said. (Be careful. A tornado is coming.) Samuel dismissed his brother's worry. " Ha bueno. Al que le toca, le toca . " (Well, if it's your time to go, it's your time to go.) A few hours later, Samuel Cifuentes was gone. At least 20 Oklahomans died in a tornado outbreak 10 days ago. Almost half of the storm's victims - four adults, including Cifuentes, and five young children - were Guatemalan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
As rain falls on much of Los Angeles, the county's top health officer is warning beach-goers to beware of surfing, swimming "and playing in ocean waters around discharging storm drains, creeks and rivers. " The rain advisory is in effect for all c ounty beaches until Thursday at 7:30 a.m. but excludes beach areas apart from discharging storm drains, rivers and creeks.  “Fortunately, discharging storm drains, creeks, and rivers only comprises a small portion of the beach, and therefore, anybody who wants to go to the beach will be able to enjoy their outing,” Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding said in a news release Monday.
HOME & GARDEN
August 17, 2012 | Chris Erskine
I've always liked slow-moving rivers - mirrors to moonlight and literature, our first and best interstates, running over rocks, as Norman Maclean so deftly put it, "from the basement of time. " So what am I doing in the San Fernando Valley, a mile from the junction of the 405 and 101? Running a river, baby. Wall of trees to my left. Wall of trees to my right. Dozens of species of chattering birds. Minnows doing button-hooks beneath a ribbon of urban drool. Honestly, if someone blindfolded and plopped you down here, without your having chugged the freeways, without your kicking up a stampede of dust when you parked along Woodley Avenue, you might think you're in Idaho.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2011 | By Jason Song and Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
For years, residents living near Ballona Creek and environmentalists have complained of mysterious sheens of oil and grease in the western Los Angeles County waterway, often blaming industrial dumping, urban runoff or other man-made causes for the pollution. One cause that apparently never crossed their minds: the La Brea Tar Pits. It turns out the tourist attraction and preferred field trip destination of seemingly every grade schooler in the region has sent oily wastewater spilling into the highly polluted creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
A coastal bluff in San Pedro is slowly buckling and sliding toward the ocean, splitting open a coastal highway with sinkholes, cracks and deep crevices that are widening day by day. Crews are hurrying to move sewer and water lines and utility poles and to reroute two major storm drains that join under Paseo Del Mar. Los Angeles city engineers have been monitoring the slide's movement on the 100-foot-high bluff next to White Point Nature Preserve since...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
In a victory for environmental groups, a federal appeals court panel has found Los Angeles County and the county flood control district responsible for discharging polluted storm runoff that flows down the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers to the Pacific Ocean. An opinion Thursday by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the Natural Resources Defense Council and Santa Monica Baykeeper, which argued that the county should be liable for allowing billions of gallons of heavily polluted stormwater to flow untreated each year into the region's rivers and eventually to the ocean, where it can sicken swimmers and surfers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
Work will soon begin on two county improvement projects, officials said Friday. Crews will build a storm drain in Studio City that will reduce flooding, and trim more than 3,000 trees on various county streets. The 3,400-foot reinforced concrete storm drain will run along Longridge Avenue, from Blairwood Drive south to Longridge Terrace, said Joel Bellman, spokesman for county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky.
WORLD
January 12, 2011 | By Jennifer Bennett, Los Angeles Times
Major portions of Brisbane resembled a watery ghost town Thursday as muddy waters from the overflowing Brisbane River inundated Australia's third-largest city, part of massive flooding throughout Queensland state that has left officials and residents reeling. In Brisbane, a city of 2 million, 11,900 homes and 2,500 businesses were completely flooded, an additional 14,700 houses and 2,500 businesses were at least partly covered by water, and 120,000 houses were without power, Mayor Campbell Newman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
It is one of the Southland's enduring contradictions. The region that laid pipe across hundreds of miles and tunneled through mountains to import water also built an extensive storm drain system to get rid of rainfall as quickly as possible. That's exactly what happened during the last week, when tens of billions of gallons of runoff that could lessen the region's need for those faraway sources were dumped into the Pacific. Enough water poured from Los Angeles streets to supply well over 130,000 homes for a year.
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