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Storm Surge

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NATIONAL
August 28, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- Federal officials warned Tuesday that slow-moving Hurricane Isaac could pummel southern Louisiana and neighboring states for more than two days, causing significant storm surge along parts of the Gulf Coast, dumping enough rain to cause widespread flooding, and spawning destructive tornadoes. "As the center of the storm comes ashore tonight, that will not be the end of the event, it will be just the beginning," Rick Knabb, director of the National Hurricane Center, told reporters on a conference call.
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NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Some of the biggest waves to hit Hawaii in years began slamming onto shore Wednesday, turning beachgoers into spectators as waves up to 40 feet tall crashed into idyllic getaways. Waves up to 50 feet high were feared on the famous North Shore of Oahu and at other islands. Beaches were closed across the island chain as the surge was expected to peak Wednesday night and remain potentially dangerous through Thursday.  Coastal roads and parking lots reportedly flooded as wind gusts up to 40 mph whipped onlookers and tore fronds from palm trees.
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NATIONAL
August 28, 2012 | By Connie Stewart
Lumbering Hurricane Isaac's speed dropped to 7 mph by midnight Tuesday but maintained its 80-mph winds, the National Hurricane Center said.  The 350-mile-wide Category 1 storm came ashore  in southeastern Louisiana at 6:45 p.m., moving northwest. Its slow speed means it is likely to hover over at least three states -- Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama -- dumping rain for days. "Isaac [is] moving slowly along the coast of southeast Louisiana and producing a dangerous storm surge," the hurricane center said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Major storms will be more destructive to coastal areas of Los Angeles as sea level rise accelerates over the century, according to a new study the city of Los Angeles commissioned to help it adjust to climate change. The study by USC took inventory of the city's coastal neighborhoods, roads, its port, energy and water infrastructure to evaluate the damage they would face from a storm under sea level rise scenarios anticipated for mid-century and 2100. Climate change, experts say, will worsen the flooding and erosion coastal areas already face during big storms as rising sea levels result in higher tides and bigger waves and storm surges.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Some of the biggest waves to hit Hawaii in years began slamming onto shore Wednesday, turning beachgoers into spectators as waves up to 40 feet tall crashed into idyllic getaways. Waves up to 50 feet high were feared on the famous North Shore of Oahu and at other islands. Beaches were closed across the island chain as the surge was expected to peak Wednesday night and remain potentially dangerous through Thursday.  Coastal roads and parking lots reportedly flooded as wind gusts up to 40 mph whipped onlookers and tore fronds from palm trees.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Tropical Storm Isaac, expected to make landfall Tuesday, could bring powerful winds, heavy rain and a storm surge of 6 to 12 feet, forecasters predict. Michael Lowry, a meteorologist with the storm surge group at the National Hurricane Center in Miami,  explained what that could mean for Gulf Coast residents. What is storm surge? A lot of people think of it like a tsunami, when actually it's a slow rise of water over many hours. You'll start to see the water rise before the storm makes landfall Tuesday.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | From National Geographic
Bangladesh is a country that floats. It sits atop one of the world's largest river deltas, a vast flood plain where the Ganges, Jamuna (Brahmaputra), Padma and Meghna rivers and their myriad tributaries interlace across terrain only a few feet above sea level. Water completely defines Bangladesh. Every year floods sweep across much of its southern Asian land. Catastrophic tropical cyclones bring storm surges as well as murderous winds.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tropical Storm Danny hovered off the Louisiana coast, where forecasters said it could become a hurricane before moving ashore today. Its 60-mph winds whipped up high tides at Grand Isle, forcing 1,500 residents to evacuate. In New Orleans, officials closed floodgates and lowered the water level in canals. Meteorologist Marshall Wickman said Danny was likely to make landfall just west of Grand Isle. Forecasters predicted a storm surge of up to 5 feet.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Many residents of areas outside the improved New Orleans levee system blame it for the flooding they experienced during Hurricane Isaac. They say the system sent water to the north in Slidell, to the west in LaPlace and to the south in Braithwaite and Jean Lafitte. Officials at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers say this is unlikely, but they have contracted with researchers at the University of North Carolina to help determine whether the new levee system redirected floodwater into certain areas during Isaac or whether the flooding would have occurred during previous storms, such as 1985's Hurricane Juan, which followed a path similar to that of Isaac.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
ASHAROKEN, N.Y. -- When James Zima built his dream house on a small cove facing Long Island Sound back in 1978, he studied storm records and built his cedar plank home on stilts, 2 feet above the highest storm surge in the previous 100 years. Super storm Sandy brought the water within 18 inches of his floorboards Monday night. That's when he ran uphill to a neighbor's house. "I barely survived it," said Zima, 61, a lean and taughtly built man with wisps of white hair. On Thursday, he had just finished raking a 2-foot mat of sea grass off his lawn.
WORLD
November 11, 2013 | By Sunshine de Leon and Barbara Demick
MANILA - Each story is more heartbreaking than the last; tales of the courage and good fortune it took to survive amid utter destruction, balanced in many cases by the last glimpse or word of a loved one who didn't. President Benigno Aquino III declared a "state of national calamity" Monday in an effort to speed up aid to islands of the central Philippines, ravaged by a monster typhoon. The death toll climbed slowly to 1,774, but it's expected to rise to 10,000 or more as bodies are collected in the cities and relief teams are able to reach cut-off rural areas.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
A storm surge propelled by a late winter storm pummeled the Northeast, causing widespread coastal flooding and destroying or severely damaging at least a dozen homes in Massachusetts, officials said. The building inspector from Newbury, about 40 miles northeast of Boston, spent Saturday surveying damage in the city's Plum Island neighborhood, where at least two homes battered by strong waves crumpled into the surf and others were threatened, Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency spokesman Peter Judge told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
WILDWOOD, N.J. - This boardwalk beach town, packed in summer and ghostly in winter, has become the last refuge for several hundred homeless survivors of Superstorm Sandy. Many place their hope in Lisa Brocco-Collia. At 41, she seems as much a force of nature as the storm itself. Her home was partially condemned after floodwater surged through the first floor. But she's been far too busy as a volunteer relief coordinator to move - setting up a donation center at the VFW post, arranging free dinners at a downtown restaurant, visiting families with her clipboard, keeping tabs on state and federal agencies, pestering politicians.
SCIENCE
November 28, 2012 | By Julie Cart
Next June -- about the time hurricane season begins to ramp up -- the city of New Orleans will take over control of one of the most sophisticated flood-control systems in the world. That, and pick up the estimated $38-million annual tab. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will have spent about $13 billion to upgrade and rebuild the system of earthen walls and levees that protects New Orleans -- about half of which is below sea level. Federal engineers compare the new safeguards to systems that protect low-lying cites such as Venice and Amsterdam.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2012 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
Where many saw tragedy for New Yorkers still homeless from Superstorm Sandy over the Thanksgiving holiday, others apparently saw opportunity. Adding to the woes of those who live on the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens - where the storm killed eight people and destroyed more than 100 homes - thieves burglarized at least three residences in a Breezy Point neighborhood last week, police confirmed Saturday. Many of those who survived Sandy have been staying with friends, family or at relief shelters during the week and returning to the Rockaways on weekends to pick up what remains of their lives.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2012 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
Housing and Urban Development Director Shaun Donovan has been chosen to lead the federal government's assistance to states rebuilding after Superstorm Sandy, President Obama announced Thursday after touring parts of New York. "We thought it'd be good to have a New Yorker who's going to be the point person," Obama said from Staten Island, where he concluded a tour with Donovan and state lawmakers that included a flyover of Far Rockaway and Breezy Point in Queens, where more than 100 homes burned as floodwaters kept firefighters at bay. Speaking in front of a few destroyed homes in Staten Island, where thousands of homes and businesses still have no power, Obama added, "We are going to be here until the rebuilding is complete.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
A storm surge propelled by a late winter storm pummeled the Northeast, causing widespread coastal flooding and destroying or severely damaging at least a dozen homes in Massachusetts, officials said. The building inspector from Newbury, about 40 miles northeast of Boston, spent Saturday surveying damage in the city's Plum Island neighborhood, where at least two homes battered by strong waves crumpled into the surf and others were threatened, Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency spokesman Peter Judge told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- As super storm Sandy made its way across Maryland late Monday night, state officials warned that the worst of the damage was yet to come. “We're America's weather in miniature today,” Gov. Martin O'Malley said at a news conference. “We've got the blizzard on one side. We've got the waves on the Atlantic, we've got the tidals and the flooding.” After making landfall near southern New Jersey with hurricane-force winds, Sandy was parked over Maryland, whipping the state with wind, rain and snow.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The grim toll from Superstorm Sandy has risen yet again in New York City with the death of a 77-year-old man who was found at the bottom of the stairs inside his dark, beachfront apartment building on Halloween. Police said Sunday that Albert McSwain was the 43rd confirmed storm-related death in the city. His apartment building, on a beachfront boulevard in the Rockaways section of Queens, lost power as the storm made landfall on Oct. 29. McSwain was found with head and body trauma, paralyzed from the neck down, on Oct. 31. He died of his injuries Saturday at a Queens hospital, officials said.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
Bruised but not beaten, New Jersey and New York are bracing for Round 2 with Mother Nature. In any other year, the nor'easter forecast to hit the Atlantic coast Wednesday and Thursday would be considered routine, National Weather Service officials said. But for a region still wobbled from Hurricane Sandy's impact last week, even a moderate storm can bring serious consequences. “No doubt, if Sandy had not made landfall, if Sandy had not happened, this would be a nor'easter but it would be a non-event compared to what we're left with now,” said Bruce Terry, lead forecaster for the National Weather Service.
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