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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
A 14-year-old Buena Park boy was killed Tuesday when rain-loosened rocks slid into Oak Creek Canyon north of Sedona, said Coconino County Sheriff's Investigator Dave Ramos. Jesse Jornes, who was with a church youth group, was hit on the head by a rock while climbing about 85 feet above the canyon floor, Ramos said.
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NEWS
April 7, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 400 undocumented immigrants were forced to turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents after being caught in a sudden, winter-like storm while crossing the Arizona desert, U.S. officials said Friday. Five people were taken by helicopter and ambulance to Tucson hospitals with symptoms that included hypothermia. Virginia Kice, spokeswoman for the U.S.
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NEWS
February 26, 1987
Nearly three feet of snow shut down schools and most travel in northern Arizona and the governor declared an emergency in two counties as a massive storm spread ice and snow from the Southwest into the western Dakotas. Workers using tracked and four-wheel-drive vehicles rescued at least nine people stranded in hard-hit central Arizona.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Firefighters in helicopters pulled stranded hikers from the tops of trail-side bathrooms and rescued pigs in wheelbarrows as monsoon rains pounded Arizona. The Catalina Mountains in southern Arizona were hit the hardest, as 6 inches of rain fell overnight. The rushing water washed away large sections of Catalina Highway, the only paved road down the mountains. Within hours, a 7-foot wall of water rushed through Sabino Canyon, snapping small trees in half.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Firefighters in helicopters pulled stranded hikers from the tops of trail-side bathrooms and rescued pigs in wheelbarrows as monsoon rains pounded Arizona. The Catalina Mountains in southern Arizona were hit the hardest, as 6 inches of rain fell overnight. The rushing water washed away large sections of Catalina Highway, the only paved road down the mountains. Within hours, a 7-foot wall of water rushed through Sabino Canyon, snapping small trees in half.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A firefighter in Arizona became the second fatality of the season as more than 20 major wildfires continued to burn out of control across the West on Tuesday. Ironically, Ernie Cachine, who was killed while battling a 200-acre timber fire in Arizona's Tonto National Forest, northeast of Phoenix, died when he was struck by lightning from one of the thunderstorms that were helping to quench blazes in the area, officials said.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
A storm with wind gusting to 76 m.p.h. dumped hail and more than three inches of rain on Tucson, causing flash floods that killed at least one person and left 11 motorists stranded in raging waters. The storm that spun off Hurricane Flossie struck during the afternoon rush hour. Flossie moved into the open Pacific on Friday after veering past Baja California. The storm also knocked out power to a wide area in and around the city, the Tucson Electric Power Co. said.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The small Havasupai Indian tribe, which makes its home at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, was struggling to save its remote village Wednesday after a rainstorm sent a 12-foot wall of water through the canyon. The flood, which hit late Monday, destroyed two homes, damaged a dozen others and killed an undetermined number of horses, the only means of transportation for food, goods and mail, Bureau of Indian Affairs officials said.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Department of Water and Power officials expressed optimism that a break in the weather Saturday will allow workers to promptly finish massive repairs to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a portion of which was damaged by thunderstorms and flash floods that pounded California desert communities last week.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 400 undocumented immigrants were forced to turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents after being caught in a sudden, winter-like storm while crossing the Arizona desert, U.S. officials said Friday. Five people were taken by helicopter and ambulance to Tucson hospitals with symptoms that included hypothermia. Virginia Kice, spokeswoman for the U.S.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
A storm with wind gusting to 76 m.p.h. dumped hail and more than three inches of rain on Tucson, causing flash floods that killed at least one person and left 11 motorists stranded in raging waters. The storm that spun off Hurricane Flossie struck during the afternoon rush hour. Flossie moved into the open Pacific on Friday after veering past Baja California. The storm also knocked out power to a wide area in and around the city, the Tucson Electric Power Co. said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
A 14-year-old Buena Park boy was killed Tuesday when rain-loosened rocks slid into Oak Creek Canyon north of Sedona, said Coconino County Sheriff's Investigator Dave Ramos. Jesse Jornes, who was with a church youth group, was hit on the head by a rock while climbing about 85 feet above the canyon floor, Ramos said.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The small Havasupai Indian tribe, which makes its home at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, was struggling to save its remote village Wednesday after a rainstorm sent a 12-foot wall of water through the canyon. The flood, which hit late Monday, destroyed two homes, damaged a dozen others and killed an undetermined number of horses, the only means of transportation for food, goods and mail, Bureau of Indian Affairs officials said.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Department of Water and Power officials expressed optimism that a break in the weather Saturday will allow workers to promptly finish massive repairs to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a portion of which was damaged by thunderstorms and flash floods that pounded California desert communities last week.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A firefighter in Arizona became the second fatality of the season as more than 20 major wildfires continued to burn out of control across the West on Tuesday. Ironically, Ernie Cachine, who was killed while battling a 200-acre timber fire in Arizona's Tonto National Forest, northeast of Phoenix, died when he was struck by lightning from one of the thunderstorms that were helping to quench blazes in the area, officials said.
NEWS
February 26, 1987
Nearly three feet of snow shut down schools and most travel in northern Arizona and the governor declared an emergency in two counties as a massive storm spread ice and snow from the Southwest into the western Dakotas. Workers using tracked and four-wheel-drive vehicles rescued at least nine people stranded in hard-hit central Arizona.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1995 | TARA MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Farmers along the Gila River are looking nervously east these days. About 80 miles upstream is Painted Rock Dam and a reservoir behind it that's filling up with runoff from winter storms across Arizona. Soon the Army Corps of Engineers will boost releases from the dam, swelling the trickle that now makes up the lower Gila to the point it could threaten farms devastated by flooding in 1993.
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