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January 27, 1990 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES and Dan Byrne, a former news editor of The Times, competed in the 1982-83 BOC Challenge, a solo around-the-world race
The "Roaring 40s" of the South Atlantic and Indian oceans sprang a trap on three solo sailors in the Globe Challenge around-the-world sailboat race. The bleak, cold, storm-whipped Southern Ocean capsized one boat, dismasted another and crippled a third with a knockdown near 40 degrees south latitude. All three skippers--Frenchmen Philippe Poupon and Jean Yves Terlain and South African Bertie Reed--are out of the 27,000-nautical-mile non-stop race that began Nov.
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NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The 1999 hurricane season was in full swing Tuesday, with three tropical storms close to hurricane strength swirling in the Atlantic region. Tropical storm Emily joined Dennis and Cindy, taking forecasters by surprise with her strength. "I don't understand what's happening out there, but things are popping," said Jerry Jarrell, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
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NEWS
August 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hurricane Gustav marched northward into the open Atlantic with its 105-m.p.h. winds after curving away from the northeastern Caribbean Islands, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said. Tropical Storm Hortense trailed about 1,100 miles to the east, a danger only to shipping. All hurricane and tropical storm warnings for the Caribbean islands were dropped. But forecasters said the northeastern islands would still feel rough seas and swells.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hurricane Gustav marched northward into the open Atlantic with its 105-m.p.h. winds after curving away from the northeastern Caribbean Islands, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said. Tropical Storm Hortense trailed about 1,100 miles to the east, a danger only to shipping. All hurricane and tropical storm warnings for the Caribbean islands were dropped. But forecasters said the northeastern islands would still feel rough seas and swells.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The 1999 hurricane season was in full swing Tuesday, with three tropical storms close to hurricane strength swirling in the Atlantic region. Tropical storm Emily joined Dennis and Cindy, taking forecasters by surprise with her strength. "I don't understand what's happening out there, but things are popping," said Jerry Jarrell, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
NEWS
August 7, 1989
Hurricane Dean sideswiped Bermuda, ripping apart hotel roofs and washing away beaches with 110-m.p.h. winds, torrential rains and pounding surf but sparing the Atlantic resort island a crippling direct blow. There were no reports of injuries, officials said. Bermuda's southern and western shores were hardest hit when Dean's eye passed just 20 miles west of the island. Between six and 10 inches of rain were expected to have fallen by the time the storm had ended.
SPORTS
January 27, 1990 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES and Dan Byrne, a former news editor of The Times, competed in the 1982-83 BOC Challenge, a solo around-the-world race
The "Roaring 40s" of the South Atlantic and Indian oceans sprang a trap on three solo sailors in the Globe Challenge around-the-world sailboat race. The bleak, cold, storm-whipped Southern Ocean capsized one boat, dismasted another and crippled a third with a knockdown near 40 degrees south latitude. All three skippers--Frenchmen Philippe Poupon and Jean Yves Terlain and South African Bertie Reed--are out of the 27,000-nautical-mile non-stop race that began Nov.
NEWS
August 7, 1989
Hurricane Dean sideswiped Bermuda, ripping apart hotel roofs and washing away beaches with 110-m.p.h. winds, torrential rains and pounding surf but sparing the Atlantic resort island a crippling direct blow. There were no reports of injuries, officials said. Bermuda's southern and western shores were hardest hit when Dean's eye passed just 20 miles west of the island. Between six and 10 inches of rain were expected to have fallen by the time the storm had ended.
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