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Storms China

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NEWS
July 6, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun set on the British Empire on Monday, and it hasn't come out since. From the day of the hand-over to Chinese rule, Hong Kong has received more than 30 inches of rain--a 100-year high--causing speculation in a week rife with symbolism about what the storms mean for the future of Hong Kong. People here considered the relentless downpour lucky at first: In Chinese, the word for "rain" sounds like the one for "money."
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OPINION
July 15, 2004 | Chalmers Johnson, Chalmers Johnson's latest book is "The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic" (Metropolitan, 2004).
Quietly and with minimal coverage in the U.S. press, the Navy announced that from mid-July through August it would hold exercises dubbed Operation Summer Pulse '04 in waters off the China coast near Taiwan. This will be the first time in U.S. naval history that seven of our 12 carrier strike groups deploy in one place at the same time. It will look like the peacetime equivalent of the Normandy landings and may well end in a disaster.
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NEWS
August 2, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wang Zhanchen rushed in where younger men feared to tread water. Alerted by cries of a hole in the dike along the swollen Yangtze River, Wang, 68, stripped off his clothes and jumped into the waterway, pushing away the debris that clawed at his bare body. With his feet, the army veteran felt for the breach in the levee, then stood sentinel in chin-high water until onlookers plugged the gap with sandbags and even family quilts.
NEWS
July 7, 2001 | From Reuters
A severe tropical storm pounded southern China on Friday, killing two people and causing tens of millions of dollars in damage after cutting a deadly swath through the Philippines and Taiwan. The storm struck the heavily populated southern province of Guangdong, razing 1,400 houses and savaging farmland. Two people were reported dead and four injured, while property losses amounted to about $120 million, the official New China News Agency reported late Friday.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A powerful typhoon which hit eastern China last week killed at least 48 people, injured 250 and left more than 40,000 homeless, the official New China News Agency said. Authorities said 45 people were missing after Typhoon Abe hit Zhejiang province on China's east coast Friday. Nearly 650,000 people were evacuated to escape flooding. The storm damaged 946,400 acres of crops, the news agency said.
NEWS
July 25, 1988 | United Press International
Hail and torrential rains killed 54 people and destroyed 730 homes in China's northwestern Gansu province as the death toll from a month of storms and near-record heat climbed to 564, officials said Sunday.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | From Reuters
Storms and ensuing floods killed 65 people and injured 1,420 in the southern Chinese province of Sichuan in late June, the official New China News Agency said Monday. Thousands of houses and about 359,000 acres of crops were destroyed.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Carrying what possessions they could, hundreds of thousands of Chinese villagers turned their backs Friday on homes that will be sacrificed to the raging waters of the Yangtze River if authorities resort to drastic measures to keep flooding at bay. With the river at record levels and rising, officials were preparing to open floodgates and, if that failed, blow up a dike to divert the swollen waters from one of the most threatened sections of the 3,900-mile waterway.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | From Reuters
A hailstorm of rare intensity struck the east China port city of Qingdao, injuring nearly 1,000 people, the Farmers Daily reported Wednesday. It said two fishermen were missing at sea and that 116,000 acres of farmland in the city's suburbs were damaged in the Monday storm.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Torrential rains and severe flooding across southern China have killed at least 51 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and swamped huge swaths of farmland, officials and state media said today. Rising waters have forced 67,000 people from their homes in 96 towns around Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province, the official China Daily newspaper reported. At least 160,000 acres of farmland were inundated, the newspaper said.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | Associated Press
A mudslide set off by heavy rains buried scores of houses in central China, killing at least 119 villagers, an official said today. The disaster struck rural Ziyang county in Shanxi province late Thursday night, the region's Anti-Flood Office said. Torrential rains fell in the area from Tuesday to Friday. The disaster brings to at least 564 the number of people killed in summer flooding throughout China this year.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | Associated Press
Fierce winds laden with desert dust buffeted Beijing on Thursday in what local reports said was the worst such storm in 10 years, delaying flights, pushing grit through windows and doors and sending people running for cover. Meteorologists said the storm, one of several unusually heavy ones this spring, was caused by dust rolling in from the northwest combined with severe winds in the Beijing region. By midmorning, yellowish clouds began to fill the horizon.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A torrential rainstorm in southeast China has killed more than 100 people and left tens of thousands homeless or stranded by flash floods, the New China News Agency said. The 24-hour deluge that began in Chenzhou in Hunan province destroyed more than 30,000 homes and did about $180 million in damage, the agency said. Three battalions of troops and police dispatched to the city evacuated 44,000 people, while 76,000 remained stranded.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A torrent of grief and a bundle of joy arrived the same day for Zhao Guangxian. On Aug. 25, his wife gave birth at a local hospital to the couple's first child while their adobe farmhouse was collapsing, a victim of rushing flood waters. Nearly six months later, Zhao and his extended family are installed in a new home. Furniture is sparse--the family fled with little save cooking supplies--and their fields are farther away, but Zhao is grateful for a roof over his head.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Carrying what possessions they could, hundreds of thousands of Chinese villagers turned their backs Friday on homes that will be sacrificed to the raging waters of the Yangtze River if authorities resort to drastic measures to keep flooding at bay. With the river at record levels and rising, officials were preparing to open floodgates and, if that failed, blow up a dike to divert the swollen waters from one of the most threatened sections of the 3,900-mile waterway.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wang Zhanchen rushed in where younger men feared to tread water. Alerted by cries of a hole in the dike along the swollen Yangtze River, Wang, 68, stripped off his clothes and jumped into the waterway, pushing away the debris that clawed at his bare body. With his feet, the army veteran felt for the breach in the levee, then stood sentinel in chin-high water until onlookers plugged the gap with sandbags and even family quilts.
NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Typhoon Winnie lashed the eastern coastal province of Zhejiang with winds and rain, killing at least 19 people and toppling more than 20,000 homes, state media reported. The storm raged across the province for almost 11 hours, affecting 7 million people, before crossing into Anhui province. Casualties were limited because 790,000 people were evacuated from coastal towns and villages.
NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Typhoon Winnie lashed the eastern coastal province of Zhejiang with winds and rain, killing at least 19 people and toppling more than 20,000 homes, state media reported. The storm raged across the province for almost 11 hours, affecting 7 million people, before crossing into Anhui province. Casualties were limited because 790,000 people were evacuated from coastal towns and villages.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun set on the British Empire on Monday, and it hasn't come out since. From the day of the hand-over to Chinese rule, Hong Kong has received more than 30 inches of rain--a 100-year high--causing speculation in a week rife with symbolism about what the storms mean for the future of Hong Kong. People here considered the relentless downpour lucky at first: In Chinese, the word for "rain" sounds like the one for "money."
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