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Storms Eastern United States

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NEWS
August 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
People along the North Carolina coast breathed sighs of relief Monday as Hurricane Dennis turned out to sea, sideswiping the shoreline with 112-mph gusts and a deluge that flooded streets and left tens of thousands without power. The storm's center started peeling away from the coast after getting no closer than 60 miles. The storm was blamed for two traffic deaths early Monday.
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NEWS
March 5, 2001 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive snowstorm bearing down Sunday on the East Coast threatened to be one of the worst nor'easters in recent years, even though New York, Washington and other metropolitan areas near the coast were spared the 2 feet of snow originally predicted.
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NEWS
January 9, 1996 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the fiercest storms in a generation pounded the East Monday, causing at least 49 deaths and leaving cities from Boston to Baltimore in knee-deep snow. The nation's capital turned into a ghost town where the federal government remained in hibernation. Only the adventurous and foolhardy ventured out. Airports in Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark, N.J., Boston and New York City shut down. Cab drivers stayed home, shopping malls were shuttered.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of mid-Atlantic and New England states began feverish preparations Saturday for a potentially epic snowstorm that could dump from 1 to 2 feet of snow on the region by the time the storm ends Tuesday.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Cold rain poured on this city Monday like an icy slap to the wounded, splashing through shattered roofs, soaking broken belongings and chilling the homeless. It added new misery to the devastation of Hurricane Hugo--as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of damage. Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. pleaded on national television for aid ranging from baby formula to bulldozers. He said: "We need everything." Electricity was restored at hospitals.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
East Coast beach-goers and coastal residents kept track of changing weather forecasts Saturday as Hurricane Dennis added muscle while moving slowly through the Bahamas. The storm's course was uncertain. Various computer models suggested it could affect the coast of the Carolinas late Monday or Tuesday, or veer away from land, forecasters said. "There's some glimmer of hope," National Hurricane Center Director Jerry Jarrell said Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
September 6, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Demoted to a tropical depression, Dennis turned its back Sunday on North Carolina after pounding the coast for a week and finally coming ashore to flood lowland towns with half a foot of rain. "I think we're finally going to get rid of it for a change," Clay Benton of the state emergency management division said Sunday. Residents of Cedar Island, sideswiped by Dennis on its way up the coast Aug.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
Dennis began plodding back toward North Carolina on Tuesday, this time as a tropical storm, raising fears among the vacationers and residents who had just started to return to the rain-lashed coast. "It's not done, and we realize in the next 72 hours it could pose a problem," said Dorothy Holt, spokeswoman for the Dare County government. The National Hurricane Center downgraded the hurricane to a tropical storm at 11 p.m.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | From Reuters
From the Mid-Atlantic to the Northeast corridor, meteorologists were watching Friday for the formation of what could be the biggest snowstorm to hit the East Coast in decades, the National Weather Service said. Forecasters were keeping an eye on two powerful weather systems that potentially could produce a major snowstorm beginning Sunday if they converge, said National Weather Service spokesman Curtis Carey.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | From Reuters
The strongest winter storm of the season lashed the Atlantic seaboard Wednesday, flooding rivers and coastal areas and dumping more than a foot of snow in parts of West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. The storm, a classic nor'easter, pounded beaches in Virginia and the Carolinas with strong winds and heavy surf and carried Atlantic moisture hundreds of miles inland, where it fell as rain, sleet and wet snow in areas still digging out from a severe winter storm last week.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | From Reuters
From the Mid-Atlantic to the Northeast corridor, meteorologists were watching Friday for the formation of what could be the biggest snowstorm to hit the East Coast in decades, the National Weather Service said. Forecasters were keeping an eye on two powerful weather systems that potentially could produce a major snowstorm beginning Sunday if they converge, said National Weather Service spokesman Curtis Carey.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A storm that paralyzed the region and left at least 13 people dead moved off the East Coast, leaving a blanket of snow in its wake. The storm raced from North Carolina into New York by the evening rush hour, dumping 10 inches in parts of southeastern Pennsylvania. Accumulations were limited to about 6 inches in most areas. The storm closed schools and highways and caused wrecks that killed 13 people in Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and West Virginia.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A wet, slushy snowstorm swept up the East Coast on Thursday, closing schools and highways and causing scores of accidents, including a deadly 116-car pileup outside the nation's capital. At least one person was killed in the huge crash on Interstate 95 near Quantico, about 40 miles south of Washington, Virginia state police said. More than 100 people were injured as the wind-driven snow dropped visibility to near zero. One official said the wreckage stretched over three miles.
NEWS
December 31, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest snowstorm in almost five years--punctuated by lightning and blizzard-like conditions--swirled up the Atlantic Coast on Saturday, closing airports, stopping train travel and forcing motorists to drive at a snail's pace. At least one person died. The mayors of Philadelphia and New York City declared snow emergencies as the storm stretched from New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the southern tip of Maine in New England.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communities along the East Coast braced Friday for a powerful storm expected to form along the Carolinas and dump as much as 16 inches of snow in the first big snowfall in five years. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for today and cautioned against unnecessary travel as municipal officials prepared snowplows and salt spreaders and readied measures against possible coastal flooding. The storm was expected to reach Boston tonight.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | Associated Press
For the first time since 1994, the nation's Atlantic and Gulf coasts got through the hurricane season without being hit by one. Two tropical storms--Gordon and Helene--hit Florida in September, causing about $26.8 million in damage but no deaths or injuries. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. Overall, there were 14 named storms during the 2000 season: eight hurricanes and six tropical storms. The average is 10 named storms per year.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Hundreds of United Airlines passengers were left temporarily stranded Monday when bad weather and a shortage of pilots led the world's largest carrier to cancel at least 242 flights nationwide. The Chicago-based airline canceled about 500 flights during the weekend. Among the flights canceled Monday were at least 15 out of Los Angeles International Airport and at least 25 out of San Francisco, said airline spokesman Matthew Triaca. United has major hubs in both cities.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they basked in sunny, mid-60s temperatures last weekend, folks in New England and the mid-Atlantic states were convinced that spring had finally arrived. Opening day of the baseball season was right around the corner and flowers were blooming from Maryland to Maine.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Hundreds of United Airlines passengers were left temporarily stranded Monday when bad weather and a shortage of pilots led the world's largest carrier to cancel at least 242 flights nationwide. The Chicago-based airline canceled about 500 flights during the weekend. Among the flights canceled Monday were at least 15 out of Los Angeles International Airport and at least 25 out of San Francisco, said airline spokesman Matthew Triaca. United has major hubs in both cities.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Doubts are brewing in Cliff Mass' mind about "The Perfect Storm." The University of Washington meteorologist says the 1991 North Atlantic tempest depicted in a best-selling book and popular new movie is merely a squall when compared to the Columbus Day storm that hit the West Coast in 1962. "The Columbus Day storm is considered to be the most damaging mid-latitude cyclone that has hit the United States probably in the last 100 years," Mass said this week.
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