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NEWS
June 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A sudden squall struck a fleet of small boats racing off the southern coast of England, capsizing 78 vessels and setting off an air-sea rescue that ended with all 156 sailors being rescued. The race began in calm weather, but the squall blew in by the afternoon, severely buffeting the 18-foot catamarans, small high-performance sailing vessels. When the coast guard recognized the scale of the emergency, it relayed a mayday, which brought 10 private boats to aid in the rescue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stone monuments can last virtually forever, but wood is much more perishable. Unless it is carefully preserved in a tomb, it generally disintegrates and disappears in a few hundred years. Researchers have thus been pleasantly surprised to discover two 4,000-year-old wooden monuments on a remote beach on the east coast of England. Preserved by silt and water, the Bronze Age structures remained hidden until they were uncovered by winter storms--one three years ago and one just last month.
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NEWS
November 3, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Britain's worst floods in more than 50 years prompted thousands of people across the country to evacuate their homes Thursday as rain continued to fall and meteorologists warned that worse was yet to come. The Environment Agency, the government organization handling flood plans, said initial estimates suggested that about 3,000 properties had already been flooded. "There is no light at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Britain's worst floods in more than 50 years prompted thousands of people across the country to evacuate their homes Thursday as rain continued to fall and meteorologists warned that worse was yet to come. The Environment Agency, the government organization handling flood plans, said initial estimates suggested that about 3,000 properties had already been flooded. "There is no light at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
December 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of people in Britain and Ireland were without electricity for a third day after powerful storms that killed seven people. As the storms that struck on Christmas Eve died down, utility companies worked round the clock to try to restore power. Six people died in Britain and one person in Ireland from toppled trees and walls and in storm-related traffic accidents. In northern Wales, 2,200 homes were still without electricity.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Crews scrambled to restore power to a million homes and clear toppled cars from cluttered highways Friday after a fierce storm flayed Western Europe with hurricane-force winds, killing more than 90. The storm, which paralyzed transportation and cut off communications in six nations, finally blew out into the Baltic Sea on Friday. It sank a Danish ship and left behind an estimated $1 billion in destruction. Official reports showed 94 dead and hundreds injured.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Temporary loss of a huge oil-storage vessel damaged in a North Sea storm could halt production for months at three oil fields in the region, a Shell UK official said. At current prices of $15 per 42-gallon barrel, the estimated combined daily output of 210,000 barrels is worth $3.15 million. It represents 10% to 12% of Britain's North Sea production. The modified tanker contained 100,000 tons of oil when it broke free in high seas and 60 m.p.h.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | Associated Press
Gales of up to 85 m.p.h. battered parts of England and Wales on Wednesday, killing three people and raising to nine the death toll in five days of storms. Winds of 30 to 40 m.p.h. were reported in London. Thunder, hail, heavy rain and wind swept southern England, causing rivers to burst their banks in Hampshire, Sussex, Surrey and Kent.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | Associated Press
A chartered helicopter crashed in bad weather near an airport south of London on Monday, killing all five people aboard, firefighters said.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
A fierce storm with torrential rains driven by winds of up to 110 m.p.h. cut a trail of destruction Thursday across southern England and into the Continent, killing at least 62 people in five countries. The casualty figure was highest in Britain, where police said 39 people died. Elsewhere, authorities reported 11 killed in the Netherlands, six in France, five in Belgium and one in West Germany.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A sudden squall struck a fleet of small boats racing off the southern coast of England, capsizing 78 vessels and setting off an air-sea rescue that ended with all 156 sailors being rescued. The race began in calm weather, but the squall blew in by the afternoon, severely buffeting the 18-foot catamarans, small high-performance sailing vessels. When the coast guard recognized the scale of the emergency, it relayed a mayday, which brought 10 private boats to aid in the rescue.
NEWS
December 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of people in Britain and Ireland were without electricity for a third day after powerful storms that killed seven people. As the storms that struck on Christmas Eve died down, utility companies worked round the clock to try to restore power. Six people died in Britain and one person in Ireland from toppled trees and walls and in storm-related traffic accidents. In northern Wales, 2,200 homes were still without electricity.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Ten crew members died Sunday when a tanker capsized in heavy seas off the coast of northern Wales as fierce storms wreaked havoc throughout Britain and Ireland. The dead crew members were among at least 28 people who died in a weekend of gales and hurricane-force winds, according to police estimates. The coast guard at Holyhead, 240 miles northwest of London, said the Maltese-registered Kimya capsized early Sunday morning after sending out a distress signal.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Thirteen people were killed Saturday as Ireland and England were lashed by gale force winds and torrential rain, police said. The London Weather Center predicted that the worst was yet to come with the storms moving eastward from Ireland into Wales and western England. Six Swiss tourists and an Irish teen-ager were killed when their van was crushed by an uprooted tree near Galway. Also in Galway, two men in a van were killed when a wall collapsed in the high winds and crushed them.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Crews scrambled to restore power to a million homes and clear toppled cars from cluttered highways Friday after a fierce storm flayed Western Europe with hurricane-force winds, killing more than 90. The storm, which paralyzed transportation and cut off communications in six nations, finally blew out into the Baltic Sea on Friday. It sank a Danish ship and left behind an estimated $1 billion in destruction. Official reports showed 94 dead and hundreds injured.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
A fierce storm with torrential rains driven by winds of up to 110 m.p.h. cut a trail of destruction Thursday across southern England and into the Continent, killing at least 62 people in five countries. The casualty figure was highest in Britain, where police said 39 people died. Elsewhere, authorities reported 11 killed in the Netherlands, six in France, five in Belgium and one in West Germany.
NEWS
October 21, 1987
The British government ordered an inquiry into the failure of weather forecasters to predict Britain's worst storm in centuries, which killed 17 people and devastated parts of London and southern England. Defense Secretary George Younger, who is responsible for the state-run Meteorological Office, called for a report from Peter Swinnerton-Dyer, head of the forecasting service, and Robert Pearce, head of the meteorology department at Reading University.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Thirteen people were killed Saturday as Ireland and England were lashed by gale force winds and torrential rain, police said. The London Weather Center predicted that the worst was yet to come with the storms moving eastward from Ireland into Wales and western England. Six Swiss tourists and an Irish teen-ager were killed when their van was crushed by an uprooted tree near Galway. Also in Galway, two men in a van were killed when a wall collapsed in the high winds and crushed them.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | Associated Press
A chartered helicopter crashed in bad weather near an airport south of London on Monday, killing all five people aboard, firefighters said.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | Reuters
Winds of up to 100 m.p.h. and torrential rainstorms raged across western England and South Wales on Saturday, uprooting hundreds of trees, flooding roads, ripping off roofs and blacking out villages. There were no reports of injuries.
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