Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStorms Georgia
IN THE NEWS

Storms Georgia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | Reuters
Ten people were injured by lightning at the Atlanta zoo Monday as they huddled beneath a canopy during a summer storm, fire officials said. The officials said lightning struck a nearby tree and spread to the crowd, causing burns and knocking some victims unconscious.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 26, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
At rallies protesting election fraud, he played the hothead while she exuded quieter strength. He demanded that the president resign to take responsibility for the cheating, while she said new clean balloting might be enough. They were an odd couple, a powerful good cop-bad cop team. Finally he stormed the parliament building, carrying a single long-stemmed rose as a symbolic replacement for a gun and leading crowds that chased President Eduard A. Shevardnadze out of the building in mid-speech.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Earl capsized fishing boats, spun off deadly tornadoes and dumped nearly 2 feet of rain on the Florida Panhandle before weakening Thursday over Georgia. At least three people were killed and one was missing. The hurricane came ashore near Panama City Beach with 80-mph winds but was downgraded to a tropical storm at midday, with its winds dropping to less than 50 mph.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | MIKE CLARY and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wind and the early rain of Hurricane Floyd, a storm bigger than half of California, licked across silver-sand beaches stretching from Florida north to the Carolinas on Tuesday as 2 million people were urged to flee and residents of the Bahamas began assessing their damage. Floyd churned northwest, and forecasters said it could strike the southeastern United States with full force late today.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
Torrential rains battered the South, where a tornado also killed a woman and an infant, injured a dozen more people and destroyed a church in a 10-mile rampage near the southern Georgia town of Moultrie. Most of the damage and both deaths occurred at a mobile home park. The tornado tore through a stand of timber after wrecking the mobile homes and then demolished the Bethlehem Schley Baptist Church, police said.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Thousands of work crews took to the streets across Georgia and Alabama on Sunday to clean up from a barrage of powerful thunderstorms and tornadoes that wrecked dozens of homes and knocked out power to 600,000 utility customers. Some 38,000 homes in Alabama and 14,000 in Georgia remained without power Sunday as utility crews worked to clear away fallen tree limbs and replace downed power lines, authorities said.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A thunderstorm that unleashed about 15,000 lightning strikes as it moved through Georgia caused dozens of fires in Atlanta, including three that engulfed apartment buildings, firefighters said. Several homes and three apartment buildings sustained heavy damage from the fires, but only two injuries were reported, according to officials. Two firefighters were injured at apartments in DeKalb County when a floor collapsed in the burning building, and a third firefighter suffered from dehydration.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
A tornado ripped apart homes and an empty elementary school Friday as it cut a 10-mile swath through northeast Georgia, killing at least 11 people and injuring 80. Hours later, two people were killed and 19 were injured when a twister flattened downtown Stoneville, N.C. The Georgia tornado hit without warning amid powerful thunderstorms about 50 miles north of Atlanta.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Thunderstorms toppled trees and power lines across Georgia, knocking out electricity to more than 200,000 homes and businesses after three days of drenching rain from New England to the Midwest. Fierce wind in Peachtree City, about 25 miles south of Atlanta, broke the wind gauge of the National Weather Service. Gusts up to 80 mph were reported elsewhere in north Georgia, including winds that bent a 4-inch-around flagpole in the Atlanta suburb of East Point.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A huge chain of twilight tornadoes whirled and churned across the Deep South, leaving at least 40 dead, hundreds injured and thousands of homes damaged, ruined or simply vanished. Despite hours of warning, many residents in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi were caught defenseless Wednesday evening against the uncommonly punishing storms. Some victims were sucked from storm cellars and emergency shelters and whisked through the air.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A thunderstorm that unleashed about 15,000 lightning strikes as it moved through Georgia caused dozens of fires in Atlanta, including three that engulfed apartment buildings, firefighters said. Several homes and three apartment buildings sustained heavy damage from the fires, but only two injuries were reported, according to officials. Two firefighters were injured at apartments in DeKalb County when a floor collapsed in the burning building, and a third firefighter suffered from dehydration.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Earl capsized fishing boats, spun off deadly tornadoes and dumped nearly 2 feet of rain on the Florida Panhandle before weakening Thursday over Georgia. At least three people were killed and one was missing. The hurricane came ashore near Panama City Beach with 80-mph winds but was downgraded to a tropical storm at midday, with its winds dropping to less than 50 mph.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Thunderstorms toppled trees and power lines across Georgia, knocking out electricity to more than 200,000 homes and businesses after three days of drenching rain from New England to the Midwest. Fierce wind in Peachtree City, about 25 miles south of Atlanta, broke the wind gauge of the National Weather Service. Gusts up to 80 mph were reported elsewhere in north Georgia, including winds that bent a 4-inch-around flagpole in the Atlanta suburb of East Point.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A huge chain of twilight tornadoes whirled and churned across the Deep South, leaving at least 40 dead, hundreds injured and thousands of homes damaged, ruined or simply vanished. Despite hours of warning, many residents in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi were caught defenseless Wednesday evening against the uncommonly punishing storms. Some victims were sucked from storm cellars and emergency shelters and whisked through the air.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
A tornado ripped apart homes and an empty elementary school Friday as it cut a 10-mile swath through northeast Georgia, killing at least 11 people and injuring 80. Hours later, two people were killed and 19 were injured when a twister flattened downtown Stoneville, N.C. The Georgia tornado hit without warning amid powerful thunderstorms about 50 miles north of Atlanta.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | EDITH STANLEY and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The death toll continued to climb Friday as rain-swollen rivers and creeks overran dozens of towns and hamlets throughout Georgia as well as in parts of Alabama and north Florida. In what is the worst flood to strike this region in 65 years, at least 23 people are dead, 300,000 were without safe drinking water and portions of interstate highways were closed because of high water. Damage estimates have reached $100 million.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | MIKE CLARY and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wind and the early rain of Hurricane Floyd, a storm bigger than half of California, licked across silver-sand beaches stretching from Florida north to the Carolinas on Tuesday as 2 million people were urged to flee and residents of the Bahamas began assessing their damage. Floyd churned northwest, and forecasters said it could strike the southeastern United States with full force late today.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | EDITH STANLEY and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The death toll continued to climb Friday as rain-swollen rivers and creeks overran dozens of towns and hamlets throughout Georgia as well as in parts of Alabama and north Florida. In what is the worst flood to strike this region in 65 years, at least 23 people are dead, 300,000 were without safe drinking water and portions of interstate highways were closed because of high water. Damage estimates have reached $100 million.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | From Associated Press
Remnants of Tropical Storm Alberto unloaded rain on Georgia for the second straight day Tuesday, forcing hundreds from their homes. Six deaths were blamed on the flooding. The storm dumped up to a foot or more of rain on the north and central parts of the state. Just south of Atlanta, some residents had to be evacuated by boat. A man trying to walk back to his Clayton County home fell into a large water-filled hole.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | Reuters
Ten people were injured by lightning at the Atlanta zoo Monday as they huddled beneath a canopy during a summer storm, fire officials said. The officials said lightning struck a nearby tree and spread to the crowd, causing burns and knocking some victims unconscious.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|