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NEWS
November 30, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 6, Wilmer Alvarado was already well on his way to becoming a street kid when tropical storm Mitch swept him into the gutters of this flooded capital city. Like thousands of other Honduran children, he had long played or begged in the street while his mother sold trinkets in the market. Such kids are always high-risk candidates, social workers say, for leaving home and wandering the streets. In Wilmer's case, Mitch turned risk into reality.
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NEWS
May 7, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carolina Suazo named her baby Brian, but everyone here calls him Mitchito--Little Mitch--for the hurricane that pummeled this island the day he was born and for two days afterward. The 6-month-old baby's nickname is just one reminder of the drubbing this tiny island off the coast of Honduras took during the most powerful Caribbean storm in two centuries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's goodwill effort for victims of hurricane-ravaged Central America continued Monday when 50,000 pounds of donated food and medical supplies destined for Honduras were loaded into two C-130 cargo airplanes at Los Alamitos Naval Air Station. "We get a lot of satisfaction doing this kind of flying," said Capt. Keith Chikasawa, 30, of Camarillo, a pilot with the 146th Airlift Wing at Channel Islands Air National Guard Station at Port Hueneme. Gov.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sure sign of trouble when Wilmer Pineda's sixth-grade teacher frantically knocked on his door at twilight. He just didn't know how much trouble. The Las Flores and San Juan rivers that met a block from his house were rising rapidly, the teacher reported. His family had to flee. That night last October, tropical storm Mitch washed away Wilmer's home, his school and his future. Hundreds of thousands of Central Americans face similar losses from the storm, which killed 9,000 people.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fears that the death count from tropical storm Mitch could exceed 7,000, Central Americans on Monday began digging their way out of the worst natural disaster to hit their countries in more than two decades. Rescue operations continued in Honduras and elsewhere for people stranded on rooftops and in trees when torrential rains from Mitch knocked out bridges, covered highways and flooded valleys with muddy water.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sure sign of trouble when Wilmer Pineda's sixth-grade teacher frantically knocked on his door at twilight. He just didn't know how much trouble. The Las Flores and San Juan rivers that met a block from his house were rising rapidly, the teacher reported. His family had to flee. That night last October, tropical storm Mitch washed away Wilmer's home, his school and his future. Hundreds of thousands of Central Americans face similar losses from the storm, which killed 9,000 people.
NEWS
May 7, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carolina Suazo named her baby Brian, but everyone here calls him Mitchito--Little Mitch--for the hurricane that pummeled this island the day he was born and for two days afterward. The 6-month-old baby's nickname is just one reminder of the drubbing this tiny island off the coast of Honduras took during the most powerful Caribbean storm in two centuries.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | Associated Press
Hurricane Mitch paused in its whirl through the western Caribbean on Wednesday to lash the Honduran coast, toppling trees, sweeping away bridges, flooding neighborhoods and killing at least 32 people in the region. Mitch was slowly weakening, but it was almost stationary over the Bay Islands. It also was only 25 miles off the coast, and hurricane-force winds stretched 105 miles from the storm's center.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 6, Wilmer Alvarado was already well on his way to becoming a street kid when tropical storm Mitch swept him into the gutters of this flooded capital city. Like thousands of other Honduran children, he had long played or begged in the street while his mother sold trinkets in the market. Such kids are always high-risk candidates, social workers say, for leaving home and wandering the streets. In Wilmer's case, Mitch turned risk into reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's goodwill effort for victims of hurricane-ravaged Central America continued Monday when 50,000 pounds of donated food and medical supplies destined for Honduras were loaded into two C-130 cargo airplanes at Los Alamitos Naval Air Station. "We get a lot of satisfaction doing this kind of flying," said Capt. Keith Chikasawa, 30, of Camarillo, a pilot with the 146th Airlift Wing at Channel Islands Air National Guard Station at Port Hueneme. Gov.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fears that the death count from tropical storm Mitch could exceed 7,000, Central Americans on Monday began digging their way out of the worst natural disaster to hit their countries in more than two decades. Rescue operations continued in Honduras and elsewhere for people stranded on rooftops and in trees when torrential rains from Mitch knocked out bridges, covered highways and flooded valleys with muddy water.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | Associated Press
Hurricane Mitch paused in its whirl through the western Caribbean on Wednesday to lash the Honduran coast, toppling trees, sweeping away bridges, flooding neighborhoods and killing at least 32 people in the region. Mitch was slowly weakening, but it was almost stationary over the Bay Islands. It also was only 25 miles off the coast, and hurricane-force winds stretched 105 miles from the storm's center.
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