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Storms Jamaica

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NEWS
September 15, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Gilbert, the most powerful storm in the recorded history of the Western Hemisphere, slammed into coastal resorts and Mayan ruins on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula with 179-m.p.h. winds and then turned toward the coast of Texas. Tens of thousands of tourists and residents took refuge in public shelters in beach communities such as Cozumel Island and Cancun, where gusts up to 218 m.p.h. and dense white sheets of rain reportedly uprooted trees and small houses and caused heavy flooding.
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NEWS
October 8, 2001 | Associated Press
Hurricane Iris whirled past Jamaica on Sunday, uprooting trees and flooding homes but sparing the island the full fury of its 85-mph winds as it churned on toward Mexico and Belize. One man was injured when his house collapsed, and winds of more than 70 mph blew the metal roofs off several houses in southwestern Jamaica, said Barbara Carby, director of the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management. Flooding forced about 10 people to flee their homes, she said.
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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Gilbert, one of the strongest storms in history, roared toward Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula today with 175 m.p.h. winds after battering the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and the tiny Cayman Islands. The hurricane killed at least five people Sunday in the Dominican Republic, civil defense officials said. Six people died and tens of thousands were left homeless in Jamaica on Monday, officials there said.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"We put the old roof back on, but if you look up, you see stars in the night," Cleveland Kerr, who lives on the poorest and hardest-hit street in this poorest of villages, said with a laugh. "But we're trying," interjected Kerr's next-door neighbor, Alphanso Tyrell, who had just finished clearing two fallen trees and sweeping the hard-packed red earth of his tiny but tidy front yard.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
As the airport here reopened Friday, some among the thousands of tourists stranded when Hurricane Gilbert devastated the island Monday expressed concern for the battered Jamaican people they will leave behind. "The people here have been so wonderful we feel guilty about our relatively privileged position," said jazz musician Gerry Mulligan, who was vacationing with his wife, Franca, at the luxurious Round Hill Hotel near here when the storm approached.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Edward Seaga brought the Rev. Jesse Jackson and two New York members of Congress here Sunday to show them the devastation that has left thousands of Jamaicans without food, shelter or work in the aftermath of Hurricane Gilbert. "The hurricane has created tremendous problems," Jackson said in this eastern city. "People cannot get to hospitals because they are overcrowded. The mortuaries are overcrowded. . . .
NEWS
October 8, 2001 | Associated Press
Hurricane Iris whirled past Jamaica on Sunday, uprooting trees and flooding homes but sparing the island the full fury of its 85-mph winds as it churned on toward Mexico and Belize. One man was injured when his house collapsed, and winds of more than 70 mph blew the metal roofs off several houses in southwestern Jamaica, said Barbara Carby, director of the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management. Flooding forced about 10 people to flee their homes, she said.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Among the 80,000 native Jamaicans who live in Los Angeles, Stone Market is a cultural and culinary outpost. It is to the hectic, little store at 6700 S. Crenshaw Blvd. in the Hyde Park area that many come to buy mango nectar, peppery spices and other imported Caribbean foods.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | RON SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Relief efforts by Los Angeles area organizations to help residents on the devastated island of Jamaica got off to a fast start this week. The problem was finding a way to fly everything from medicine to hammers and roofing supplies to the storm-crippled island, officials said Friday. "We have tons and tons of things," said Donovan Gordon, 30, a Los Angeles sales representative from Old Harbour Bay, Jamaica, who is coordinating a relief effort for a group calling itself Concerned Jamaicans.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"We put the old roof back on, but if you look up, you see stars in the night," Cleveland Kerr, who lives on the poorest and hardest-hit street in this poorest of villages, said with a laugh. "But we're trying," interjected Kerr's next-door neighbor, Alphanso Tyrell, who had just finished clearing two fallen trees and sweeping the hard-packed red earth of his tiny but tidy front yard.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Edward Seaga brought the Rev. Jesse Jackson and two New York members of Congress here Sunday to show them the devastation that has left thousands of Jamaicans without food, shelter or work in the aftermath of Hurricane Gilbert. "The hurricane has created tremendous problems," Jackson said in this eastern city. "People cannot get to hospitals because they are overcrowded. The mortuaries are overcrowded. . . .
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
As the airport here reopened Friday, some among the thousands of tourists stranded when Hurricane Gilbert devastated the island Monday expressed concern for the battered Jamaican people they will leave behind. "The people here have been so wonderful we feel guilty about our relatively privileged position," said jazz musician Gerry Mulligan, who was vacationing with his wife, Franca, at the luxurious Round Hill Hotel near here when the storm approached.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | RON SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Relief efforts by Los Angeles area organizations to help residents on the devastated island of Jamaica got off to a fast start this week. The problem was finding a way to fly everything from medicine to hammers and roofing supplies to the storm-crippled island, officials said Friday. "We have tons and tons of things," said Donovan Gordon, 30, a Los Angeles sales representative from Old Harbour Bay, Jamaica, who is coordinating a relief effort for a group calling itself Concerned Jamaicans.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Among the 80,000 native Jamaicans who live in Los Angeles, Stone Market is a cultural and culinary outpost. It is to the hectic, little store at 6700 S. Crenshaw Blvd. in the Hyde Park area that many come to buy mango nectar, peppery spices and other imported Caribbean foods.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Gilbert, the most powerful storm in the recorded history of the Western Hemisphere, slammed into coastal resorts and Mayan ruins on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula with 179-m.p.h. winds and then turned toward the coast of Texas. Tens of thousands of tourists and residents took refuge in public shelters in beach communities such as Cozumel Island and Cancun, where gusts up to 218 m.p.h. and dense white sheets of rain reportedly uprooted trees and small houses and caused heavy flooding.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Gilbert, one of the strongest storms in history, roared toward Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula today with 175 m.p.h. winds after battering the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and the tiny Cayman Islands. The hurricane killed at least five people Sunday in the Dominican Republic, civil defense officials said. Six people died and tens of thousands were left homeless in Jamaica on Monday, officials there said.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Tropical Storm Cindy flooded streets, shut down oil production and knocked out power to thousands in Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi on Wednesday before weakening and moving inland. The storm brought about 10 inches of rain and 70-mph winds. There was substantial flooding along the Gulf Coast, and the storm ripped up piers in Alabama as it passed.
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