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NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Tropical storm Olga was heading for China today after leaving a trail of destruction on the Korean peninsula, where at least 63 people were dead or missing after four days of torrential rain. South Korean authorities said 35 people were dead and 28 missing since Friday. Olga swept through the peninsula early Tuesday. Olga was downgraded to a tropical storm from typhoon strength late Tuesday.
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NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Tropical storm Olga was heading for China today after leaving a trail of destruction on the Korean peninsula, where at least 63 people were dead or missing after four days of torrential rain. South Korean authorities said 35 people were dead and 28 missing since Friday. Olga swept through the peninsula early Tuesday. Olga was downgraded to a tropical storm from typhoon strength late Tuesday.
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NEWS
August 27, 1995 | Associated Press
Floods triggered by four days of torrential rains had killed at least 36 people Saturday and forced tens of thousands from their homes in both North and South Korea. South Korea's national disaster headquarters warned of more flooding as Typhoon Janis approached the peninsula Saturday night. Although weakening, it was expected to hit North Korea's southwestern region--the country's traditional breadbasket--and could worsen already acute food shortages there.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | Associated Press
Floods triggered by four days of torrential rains had killed at least 36 people Saturday and forced tens of thousands from their homes in both North and South Korea. South Korea's national disaster headquarters warned of more flooding as Typhoon Janis approached the peninsula Saturday night. Although weakening, it was expected to hit North Korea's southwestern region--the country's traditional breadbasket--and could worsen already acute food shortages there.
WORLD
September 3, 2002 | BARBARA DEMICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the skies cleared over the Korean peninsula Monday, helicopters swooped low over large swaths of the countryside entombed in mud and found devastation from a weekend typhoon far greater than originally believed. South Korean authorities raised the toll to 138 dead and 77 missing, while the first word filtered down from secretive North Korea that it had not been spared.
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