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Storms Louisiana

NEWS
August 30, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton waded gingerly Saturday into the brewing controversy over the Bush Administration's response to the destruction wreaked by Hurricane Andrew, saying that a inquiry into the federal government's actions was warranted. Clinton avoided direct criticism of President Bush and contended that he did not want to "politicize" the issue of the federal response to the disaster. But he opened the door to suggestions that he was doing just that.
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NEWS
August 29, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Winn-Dixie supermarket was closed by storm damage, its broken windows boarded over and its food spoiling. But the parking lot was a magnet Friday for the homeless and the hungry. One of them was Amelia Berard, 54, who sat listlessly in an aging silver Chrysler, nibbling the three pancakes served up by a group of Southern Baptists who had driven in from Texas with a self-contained cook trailer. "The roof was blown off my house and everything was floating in the water," said Berard.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to extricate himself from turmoil surrounding relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, President Bush defended the federal response to the massive storm damage on Friday and declared that he would send more help if needed. "We will commit all federal military resources necessary to help the people in Florida," he said at a hastily called meeting with reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With windows smashed and merchandise vulnerable to anyone walking down the street, only those who live here are unsurprised at the lack of looting in this town of 10,000 after the devastation of Hurricane Andrew. "We're family here," Dan Darden said Thursday as he stood outside his ruined furniture store waving to passersby and calling them by their first names. "Cajuns are very close, strong-knit and tight."
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and GLENN BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hurricane Andrew wheezed out Wednesday over the battered plantations of Louisiana and flung a final tornado into neighboring Mississippi after claiming a 20th life on its five-day trip of terror from the Bahamas. At noon CDT, the hurricane degenerated into a tropical storm, with sustaining winds of less than 74 m.p.h. It nudged northward toward Natchez, Miss., blowing at 55 m.p.h. Including the damage it caused in Florida and Louisiana, Andrew was America's costliest disaster ever.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and GLENN BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hurricane Andrew slammed into the Louisiana bayous Tuesday night like a fist from the sea, scattering possibly a million residents of this state as well as Texas and Mississippi who fled in its path, lest they be added to the 17 already killed in what could be the costliest natural disaster in American history. Winds of 140 m.p.h. struck the marshy coast just before 10 p.m. CDT, said Bob Sheets, director of the National Hurricane Center. The winds weakened to 125 m.p.h.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Tornadoes ripped through Kansas and Oklahoma on Friday, killing at least 28 people, authorities said. Andover, a small town outside Wichita, was the hardest hit. A twister that damaged 500 homes there killed at least 22 people, Andover Mayor Jack Finlason told reporters. "The southeast part of town, especially the mobile home park, is completely leveled," the mayor said. "The injuries are too numerous at this point to assess." Two deaths were reported in Wichita and one near Winfield, Kan.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
High winds hurled debris and ripped down a stage where up to 10,000 people had gathered for an outdoor concert in Baton Rouge, La. At least 27 were injured on the grounds of the Centroplex, part of the city government building complex across the street from the Mississippi River levee. The sudden storm downed power lines and tree limbs across Baton Rouge, a police dispatcher said.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Chantal, the first of the season, aimed for the Texas and Louisiana coasts Monday, a day in which the storm's winds capsized an oil drilling work vessel and trapped as many as 10 crew members inside. Three of the crewmen were picked up by a nearby fishing vessel and a fourth was plucked from the water by a Coast Guard helicopter. The Coast Guard also said there were unconfirmed reports that two others had been picked up by another boat.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A line of severe storms in central Louisiana spawned tornadoes that touched down in three areas Monday, downing power lines, toppling trees and damaging buildings, officials said. Hundreds of miles away, the same storm system brought more rain to waterlogged Kentucky as highway crews struggled to reopen scores of roads closed almost a week ago by the worst flooding to hit the state in a decade.
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