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Storms Mexico

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NEWS
September 4, 1988
Two tropical storms battered Mexico's coastal regions, resulting in numerous flash floods and mudslides that killed at least four people and forced more than 50,000 others from their homes, officials said. On the Gulf Coast, heavy rains from Tropical Storm Debby pounded the town of Papantla, causing mudslides that buried two homes and killed three people, officials in the southeastern state of Veracruz said.
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NATIONAL
March 20, 2010 | By Bill Hanna
Monarch butterflies, devastated by storms at their winter home in Mexico, have dwindled to their lowest population levels in decades as they begin to return to the United States and Canada. The monarch loss is estimated at 50% to 60%, which means the breeding population is expected to be the smallest since the Mexican overwintering colonies were discovered in 1975, said Chip Taylor, a professor of entomology and director of Monarch Watch at the University of Kansas. "I think it is very clear that the butterflies lost more than half of the population," Taylor said.
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NEWS
February 9, 1998 | H.G. REZA and DAVE LESHER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of harsh winter storms gave most state residents a brief break Sunday after hitting Baja California with a vengeance, killing at least 13 people in widespread flash flooding throughout the border area. The overnight storm hit the cities of Tijuana and Rosarito hardest, forcing the evacuation of 220 people in Tijuana alone. An estimated 500 others were trapped in their homes by flood waters, which had destroyed or damaged at least 300 residences, officials said.
WORLD
August 31, 2006 | From Reuters
Hurricane John barreled along Mexico's Pacific coast Wednesday as a dangerous Category 3 storm, pounding beach resorts with heavy rain and strong winds. Residents of the busy port of Manzanillo boarded up doors and windows, and those living by hills were moved to emergency shelters. "What worries me most is if there is a mudslide. Here, the people most at risk are those living in the hills," customs official Jaime Gonzalez said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Laura Wadhams and her sister, Pamela Muckleroy, deliverance from flood-ravaged Baja California Norte came on the wings of a plane chartered by their father, Golden West College math professor, John Wadhams. Stranded with hundreds of other U.S. tourists in the town of Vicente Guerrero, north of San Quintin, about 200 miles south of the border, the two young women were relieved to see a jaunty pilot emerge Sunday from the aircraft with hamburgers and soft drinks.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | H.G. REZA and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a wall of water crashed through their impoverished colonia 3 de Octubre neighborhood, Andrea Quintero helplessly watched her husband being swept away to his death. "I saw [his] truck go tumbling in the water and my husband disappear," Quintero, 30, said Monday, pain and horror still etched on her face. "He never yelled. I couldn't believe what happened. I called out his name, but he didn't answer." Shortly after 3 a.m.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Gilbert, the most powerful storm in the recorded history of the Western Hemisphere, slammed into coastal resorts and Mayan ruins on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula with 179-m.p.h. winds and then turned toward the coast of Texas. Tens of thousands of tourists and residents took refuge in public shelters in beach communities such as Cozumel Island and Cancun, where gusts up to 218 m.p.h. and dense white sheets of rain reportedly uprooted trees and small houses and caused heavy flooding.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after Hurricane Pauline ravaged Mexico's Pacific coast, Lucia Ramirez still didn't know Saturday if her teenage son, mother and brother are among the survivors. "I'm worried to death," Ramirez said outside the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles. With telephone service to Acapulco and other shattered communities still spotty, Ramirez is among the legions of Southern California residents desperately seeking information about relatives and friends in Mexico.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | Associated Press
What was believed to be the heaviest rainstorm in 90 years flooded large sections of this northern Mexico state capital by Sunday, killing at least 40 people and leaving more than 5,000 homeless, authorities said. Another 30 people were reported missing by the Red Cross. The storm hit Saturday night dumping more than 5 inches in the area around Chihuahua City, about 200 miles south of El Paso. It was still raining in the city of 600,000 late Sunday.
NEWS
September 16, 1988 | Washington Post
The 90-mile drive across the path of Hurricane Gilbert from the town of Valladolid was a gantlet of trees and power lines strewn on the road. Thatched-roof homes were wrecked, crops flattened and small villages on the edge of the Yucatan jungle looked like ghost towns. Sheets of rain slashed across the jungle-bordered road, reducing visibility to practically zero, and fierce winds blew from the north, then suddenly changed direction.
WORLD
October 5, 2003 | From Reuters
Tropical Storm Larry dumped heavy rain on Mexico's eastern coast Saturday and two oil shipping ports in the Gulf of Mexico remained shut as it threatened to turn into a hurricane. In the Pacific, Hurricane Nora was grinding about 400 miles south-southwest of the popular tourist resort of Cabo San Lucas in Baja California, while another tropical storm, Olaf, hovered off Acapulco. Neither Nora nor Olaf was expected to make landfall soon.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The once-mighty Tropical Storm Chantal continued to weaken as it churned a slow path across the Yucatan Peninsula, but forecasters warned that it could still develop into a hurricane once it hit the Gulf of Mexico's warm waters. Forecasters downgraded Chantal to a tropical depression late Tuesday, a day after the storm hit land with near-hurricane force, battering Chetumal's shuttered homes and businesses, snapping power lines and hurling tree branches and debris through the air.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Tropical Storm Dalila, the fourth of the Pacific hurricane season, formed off Mexico's southern Pacific coast and threatened to become a hurricane. The Mexican government declared a tropical storm watch for a 250-mile stretch of coast from Acapulco east to Puerto Angel. While the storm is expected to stay about 150 miles offshore as it skirts the coast, heavy rains could pose a risk of flooding along the coastline. Dalila was moving slowly westward, said the U.S.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
Keith regained hurricane strength for a short time and hit land just north of Mexico's gulf coast port of Tampico on Thursday with winds of 90 mph, ripping roofs off homes, causing flooding and forcing the evacuation of more than 2,500 people. No injuries or deaths were reported as of Thursday evening. Hurricane Keith ravaged Central America as a powerful Category 3 hurricane this week, passing over the Yucatan Peninsula and entering the Gulf of Mexico after weakening to tropical storm status.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Coastal residents of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula and northeastern Belize fled their homes as the dangerous core of Hurricane Keith came ashore. Heavy rain and flooding throughout Central America caused at least two deaths and forced hundreds of people to be evacuated. The slow-moving storm lost strength as it drifted inland, with winds dropping to 115 mph from a high of 135 mph. It was expected to further weaken today.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Tropical storm Ileana churned past the southern tip of Baja California on Tuesday and headed out to sea, while another storm, Beryl, moved inland, dumping rain on Texas and northern Mexico as it weakened. Ileana doused the Baja resort areas of Los Cabos with rain, but "nothing too severe," said Randy Lehr, the American manager of the Hacienda Beach Resort in Cabo San Lucas. "It looks like we got lucky, and the storm passed by to the south," Lehr said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo acknowledged Monday that many Mexican villages were still desperate for food nearly a week after being devastated by floods, but he chastised politicians who have criticized the government relief effort. "It's simply not fair to take advantage of this tragedy to gain space in a newspaper or TV or radio news show," declared the president, who then donned a red slicker and sloshed through the muddy remains of a shattered neighborhood in Puebla state.
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | Associated Press
Hurricane Greg weakened to a tropical storm as it brushed the tip of Mexico's Baja California on Tuesday, causing heavy rain, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of residents and stranding American tourists. Water rose thigh-deep at crossroads outside the resort town of Cabo San Lucas, flooding some buildings. Army jeeps carried local residents across the flooded area to their homes. But tourist cafes reopened their doors, and residents began to return to their rain-soaked homes. At 9 p.m.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Mudslides triggered by heavy rain killed two people and injured three others in central Mexico on Thursday, while flooding damaged hundreds of homes. A 60-year-old farmer was killed when a hillside gave way while he was working in his fields in a village about 100 miles from Mexico City. A 60-year-old woman and a 6-year-old boy who were with the farmer were injured in the slide and taken to a nearby hospital.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Except for a bit of nostalgia, the economic world reacted with utter indifference late last year when a tropical storm wiped out half of Mexico's vanilla crop. Mexico once held a global monopoly in vanilla, the lusciously aromatic spice used in sweets and baked goods, and as recently as the 1930s controlled half the world market. But today, Mexico produces so few vanilla beans it is a "nonfactor," a leading spice expert says.
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