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Storms Mississippi

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NEWS
March 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Powerful tornadoes swept across south-central Mississippi on Saturday, killing seven people and injuring 145 others. Fallen trees and power lines made rescue efforts difficult. "We've got injuries along a 15- to 20-mile track," said Carl Carlos, Jones County Civil Defense director. Officials called units of the National Guard to help clear roadways and prevent looting Saturday night in damaged areas.
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NATIONAL
May 14, 2002 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day by day, almost hour by hour, Deidre Johnson can look out her office window and watch the mighty, muddy Mississippi River slosh over its bank and slurp up first the curb, then the street, then the first few broad steps leading to the Gateway Arch. "It's like the river is taking over," said Johnson, who sells riverboat cruises. "That's what it looks like. Like the river is swallowing everything up." Well, not quite everything. At least, not yet.
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NEWS
March 2, 1987
Heavy rain fell from the mid-Atlantic coast to Florida, forcing evacuations to escape flooding in North Carolina, while the same storm system blanketed the Great Lakes region with more than half a foot of snow. Heavy rains since Saturday have been blamed for at least 13 deaths, nine from traffic accidents. In Mississippi, where the storm brought tornadoes that killed seven people on Saturday, residents and cleanup crews worked to recover belongings and clear wreckage.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His own home was without power. A pine tree leaned up against the house next door. But still, a day after Hurricane Georges unleashed its ferocious winds and torrential rains on the Gulf Coast, 68-year-old Ingle Brewer pronounced the experience not nearly as bad as it could have been. "I wouldn't have missed it for the world," said Brewer--who unlike 1.5 million other residents from the Florida Panhandle to New Orleans who fled for safety until the storm subsided, decided to ride it out at home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Recent torrential rains and a tornado that killed seven people over the weekend caused damage estimated at $28.5 million, Gov. Bill Allain said Tuesday. Allain asked President Reagan to declare a disaster for Jones County, where the tornado on Saturday cut a path of destruction 20 miles long. About 700 people were left homeless, Allain's office reported after completing a survey of the area.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His own home was without power. A pine tree leaned up against the house next door. But still, a day after Hurricane Georges unleashed its ferocious winds and torrential rains on the Gulf Coast, 68-year-old Ingle Brewer pronounced the experience not nearly as bad as it could have been. "I wouldn't have missed it for the world," said Brewer--who unlike 1.5 million other residents from the Florida Panhandle to New Orleans who fled for safety until the storm subsided, decided to ride it out at home.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A tornado plowed through the historic town of Natchez, tearing the roof off a school and injuring three children inside. Lt. Rusty Brill, a spokesman for the Mississippi Highway Patrol, said troopers took three children from Cathedral Elementary School to a hospital, but none of the injuries appeared life-threatening. A spokeswoman at Natchez Regional Medical Center said the hospital emergency room was placed on full alert after the tornado struck.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly but furiously, Hurricane Georges crawled across the tan sands of the Gulf Coast on Monday and lumbered into the state of Mississippi, causing three deaths, spreading destruction across hundreds of miles and driving out 1.5 million people in one of the biggest evacuations in hurricane history. National Guard troops waded through chest-deep water to carry children to safety. More than 400 people fled shelter in a college gym after the wind demolished the roof.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2002 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day by day, almost hour by hour, Deidre Johnson can look out her office window and watch the mighty, muddy Mississippi River slosh over its bank and slurp up first the curb, then the street, then the first few broad steps leading to the Gateway Arch. "It's like the river is taking over," said Johnson, who sells riverboat cruises. "That's what it looks like. Like the river is swallowing everything up." Well, not quite everything. At least, not yet.
NEWS
September 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
A new analysis of the record flooding in the Midwest this summer says that the unusual Pacific Ocean warming known as El Nino was probably a leading cause. El Nino is part of a complex phenomenon known as ENSO, which causes the water in the central Pacific Ocean to warm up every three to seven years.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly but furiously, Hurricane Georges crawled across the tan sands of the Gulf Coast on Monday and lumbered into the state of Mississippi, causing three deaths, spreading destruction across hundreds of miles and driving out 1.5 million people in one of the biggest evacuations in hurricane history. National Guard troops waded through chest-deep water to carry children to safety. More than 400 people fled shelter in a college gym after the wind demolished the roof.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A tornado plowed through the historic town of Natchez, tearing the roof off a school and injuring three children inside. Lt. Rusty Brill, a spokesman for the Mississippi Highway Patrol, said troopers took three children from Cathedral Elementary School to a hospital, but none of the injuries appeared life-threatening. A spokeswoman at Natchez Regional Medical Center said the hospital emergency room was placed on full alert after the tornado struck.
NEWS
September 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
A new analysis of the record flooding in the Midwest this summer says that the unusual Pacific Ocean warming known as El Nino was probably a leading cause. El Nino is part of a complex phenomenon known as ENSO, which causes the water in the central Pacific Ocean to warm up every three to seven years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Recent torrential rains and a tornado that killed seven people over the weekend caused damage estimated at $28.5 million, Gov. Bill Allain said Tuesday. Allain asked President Reagan to declare a disaster for Jones County, where the tornado on Saturday cut a path of destruction 20 miles long. About 700 people were left homeless, Allain's office reported after completing a survey of the area.
NEWS
March 2, 1987
Heavy rain fell from the mid-Atlantic coast to Florida, forcing evacuations to escape flooding in North Carolina, while the same storm system blanketed the Great Lakes region with more than half a foot of snow. Heavy rains since Saturday have been blamed for at least 13 deaths, nine from traffic accidents. In Mississippi, where the storm brought tornadoes that killed seven people on Saturday, residents and cleanup crews worked to recover belongings and clear wreckage.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Powerful tornadoes swept across south-central Mississippi on Saturday, killing seven people and injuring 145 others. Fallen trees and power lines made rescue efforts difficult. "We've got injuries along a 15- to 20-mile track," said Carl Carlos, Jones County Civil Defense director. Officials called units of the National Guard to help clear roadways and prevent looting Saturday night in damaged areas.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
Tornadoes and spring-like thunderstorms swept across Arkansas and four other states Saturday, flattening buildings, sweeping away mobile homes and flooding whole subdivisions. As many as 27 people were killed and more than 200 were injured. Arkansas suffered the largest number of fatalities, at least 20. "It's horrible. The whole downtown is gone," said Jeremy Cox of Arkadelphia in central Arkansas.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Flooding in Kentucky left five people dead on a winter weekend that included snow in the Midwest and New England, apparent tornadoes in the South and record heat in New York. Almost half a million customers were reportedly without power across Michigan and New England as winter weather hampered early holiday travel. More than 200 flights were canceled in Chicago as New Yorkers strolled through balmy Central Park in shirt-sleeves. Strong winds, rain and at least one reported tornado pummeled Kentucky, where officials said a vehicle carrying five people drove into floodwaters from the Rolling Fork River near New Hope, about 50 miles southeast of Louisville.
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