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Storms Nicaragua

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NEWS
November 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Mudslides buried several communities near Nicaragua's northwestern border with Honduras, killing at least 58 people, according to a local mayor, and pushing up the death toll from one of the strongest Caribbean hurricanes to at least 450. Only 57 of the 2,500 people living in 10 communities at the foot of Casita Volcano had been accounted for by Saturday evening, Mayor Felicita Zeledon of Posoltega, about 20 miles south of the mudslide area, told the government's Radio Nicaragua.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over the Nicaraguan government's handling of a Los Angeles hurricane aid shipment has snowballed into questions about the consul general's management of tens of thousands of dollars in donations.
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NEWS
November 13, 1988 | JULIA PRESTON, The Washington Post
The Sandinista government is planning to postpone until 1990 municipal elections that were expected next year because it cannot afford to hold them amid a crushing economic crisis, Luis Carrion, the minister for economic affairs, said in an interview. Carrion is one of the nine top comandantes of the Sandinista National Liberation Front, the government party. They are the final decision makers in Nicaragua.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of tons of hurricane aid from Los Angeles are stacked up in metal containers under the hot sun at this small port. An hour's drive away, thousands of victims--barefoot children with swollen bellies, a mother cooking beans in an old paint can--are barely surviving in makeshift refugee camps. Long delays in getting help to Hurricane Mitch victims are not what Nicole Wool and thousands of other Los Angeles donors had in mind.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, which has withheld official disaster aid to Nicaragua in the wake of Hurricane Joan, is also deliberately hampering relief efforts by private U.S. charities, aid officials charged Friday. Several private charitable organizations complained that the Administration has refused to assist their efforts to deliver donated goods to Nicaragua and has even threatened to declare some aid shipments illegal under the U.S. economic embargo of the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over the Nicaraguan government's handling of a Los Angeles hurricane aid shipment has snowballed into questions about the consul general's management of tens of thousands of dollars in donations.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fears that the death count from tropical storm Mitch could exceed 7,000, Central Americans on Monday began digging their way out of the worst natural disaster to hit their countries in more than two decades. Rescue operations continued in Honduras and elsewhere for people stranded on rooftops and in trees when torrential rains from Mitch knocked out bridges, covered highways and flooded valleys with muddy water.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of tons of hurricane aid from Los Angeles are stacked up in metal containers under the hot sun at this small port. An hour's drive away, thousands of victims--barefoot children with swollen bellies, a mother cooking beans in an old paint can--are barely surviving in makeshift refugee camps. Long delays in getting help to Hurricane Mitch victims are not what Nicole Wool and thousands of other Los Angeles donors had in mind.
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | ARACELY ACOSTA and JUANITA DARLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Authorities declared a cholera and leptospirosis epidemic Friday in three Nicaraguan counties hit hard by flooding from tropical storm Mitch, confirming fears that the storm's devastation will provoke more deaths--this time from disease. Seven people have died and 361 others are ill from diseases that health authorities believe stem from polluted waters and rodents in urban areas in the aftermath of Mitch's flooding.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Joan blew out of Central America into the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, after killing at least 98 people in six days and five countries and causing what President Daniel Ortega called "the greatest losses Nicaragua has suffered as a result of a natural catastrophe." Hundreds were injured in Nicaragua and elsewhere in Central America and scores were missing. About 300,000 were reported to be at least temporarily homeless in this country alone.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Central American countries most ravaged by tropical storm Mitch have received extensive debt relief from the world's richest creditor nations, sources confirmed Thursday. Paris Club members, including the United States, have agreed to forgive 80% of Nicaragua's debt, consider a similar reduction for Honduras and postpone for three years all payments on both countries' loans.
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | ARACELY ACOSTA and JUANITA DARLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Authorities declared a cholera and leptospirosis epidemic Friday in three Nicaraguan counties hit hard by flooding from tropical storm Mitch, confirming fears that the storm's devastation will provoke more deaths--this time from disease. Seven people have died and 361 others are ill from diseases that health authorities believe stem from polluted waters and rodents in urban areas in the aftermath of Mitch's flooding.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fears that the death count from tropical storm Mitch could exceed 7,000, Central Americans on Monday began digging their way out of the worst natural disaster to hit their countries in more than two decades. Rescue operations continued in Honduras and elsewhere for people stranded on rooftops and in trees when torrential rains from Mitch knocked out bridges, covered highways and flooded valleys with muddy water.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Mudslides buried several communities near Nicaragua's northwestern border with Honduras, killing at least 58 people, according to a local mayor, and pushing up the death toll from one of the strongest Caribbean hurricanes to at least 450. Only 57 of the 2,500 people living in 10 communities at the foot of Casita Volcano had been accounted for by Saturday evening, Mayor Felicita Zeledon of Posoltega, about 20 miles south of the mudslide area, told the government's Radio Nicaragua.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | JULIA PRESTON, The Washington Post
The Sandinista government is planning to postpone until 1990 municipal elections that were expected next year because it cannot afford to hold them amid a crushing economic crisis, Luis Carrion, the minister for economic affairs, said in an interview. Carrion is one of the nine top comandantes of the Sandinista National Liberation Front, the government party. They are the final decision makers in Nicaragua.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, which has withheld official disaster aid to Nicaragua in the wake of Hurricane Joan, is also deliberately hampering relief efforts by private U.S. charities, aid officials charged Friday. Several private charitable organizations complained that the Administration has refused to assist their efforts to deliver donated goods to Nicaragua and has even threatened to declare some aid shipments illegal under the U.S. economic embargo of the country.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
When Bluefields celebrated its 85th anniversary as a city last week, it was a funky fishing port with a reggae beat and an Afro-Caribbean visage--a crazy quilt of brightly painted wooden houses and magnificent churches sprawled along a bay. Long in decay, it was still proud to be different from the rest of Nicaragua. The anniversary festivities, and much that was Bluefields itself, came to a traumatic end last Saturday at 2:47 a.m.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Daniel Ortega asked other nations Friday to "redouble their efforts" to help his country's recovery from a hurricane that killed 116 Nicaraguans and left "incalculable damage" to an economy already crippled by war. "International cooperation is urgent and necessary," Ortega said in a televised speech to government officials and foreign diplomats. "The situation is truly critical and dramatic."
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Daniel Ortega asked other nations Friday to "redouble their efforts" to help his country's recovery from a hurricane that killed 116 Nicaraguans and left "incalculable damage" to an economy already crippled by war. "International cooperation is urgent and necessary," Ortega said in a televised speech to government officials and foreign diplomats. "The situation is truly critical and dramatic."
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
When Bluefields celebrated its 85th anniversary as a city last week, it was a funky fishing port with a reggae beat and an Afro-Caribbean visage--a crazy quilt of brightly painted wooden houses and magnificent churches sprawled along a bay. Long in decay, it was still proud to be different from the rest of Nicaragua. The anniversary festivities, and much that was Bluefields itself, came to a traumatic end last Saturday at 2:47 a.m.
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