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Storms North Carolina

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NEWS
November 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
A fierce Atlantic storm Saturday lashed North Carolina's Outer Banks with strong winds and large waves that crashed through sand dunes shielding oceanfront homes. Residents fought back with sandbags and bulldozers. At least one home--already heavily damaged by previous storms--was knocked down by waves, authorities said. The rest of the East Coast braced for the wintry onslaught, less than two weeks after another storm pummeled the region.
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NEWS
January 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
North Carolina struggled Wednesday with the aftermath of a record 2-foot snowfall in a part of the country that does not have much experience with blizzards. The snowstorm left thousands of people stuck in cold, dark homes. Raleigh and Richmond, Va., remained virtually paralyzed Wednesday. More than 140,000 homes and businesses remained without electricity in the Carolinas. Travel was especially treacherous along Interstate 85 south of the Virginia-North Carolina line.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The two dominant home and automobile insurers in the Carolinas said Tuesday that they expect to be hit with about $600 million in claims from Hurricane Hugo. Such heavy losses suggest that the storm will be the most expensive ever for the insurance industry. State Farm Insurance Co. expects claims as high as $400 million in South Carolina, where it insures one out of every five homes, spokesman Jerry Parsons said. The Bloomington, Ill.
NEWS
November 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
A string of forlorn-looking Christmas lights dangles above the moldy, peeling clapboard on George and Frances Spruill's front porch in their flood-ravaged neighborhood. A couple of miles across town, the Spruills sit in less-familiar surroundings and check off a wish list that would make even the most spartan Christmas dreams seem splendid by comparison: a shower curtain, a curtain rod, a pot in which to cook collard greens.
NEWS
September 6, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Demoted to a tropical depression, Dennis turned its back Sunday on North Carolina after pounding the coast for a week and finally coming ashore to flood lowland towns with half a foot of rain. "I think we're finally going to get rid of it for a change," Clay Benton of the state emergency management division said Sunday. Residents of Cedar Island, sideswiped by Dennis on its way up the coast Aug.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Six inches of rain fell across eastern North Carolina, flooding roads and threatening homes in an area scarcely beginning its recovery from the misery brought by Hurricane Floyd. Swirling brown water again closed streets and highways, and rivers inched higher and threatened two dams. Authorities went door to door advising residents they should prepare for possible evacuation. Nearly two weeks ago, Hurricane Floyd dropped 20 inches of rain, killing at least 47 people.
NEWS
September 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
After a week of wandering off the North Carolina coast, Tropical Storm Dennis washed ashore Saturday afternoon and dumped torrential rains through much of eastern North Carolina. There were no reports of significant damage or injuries but flooding was reported in several coastal counties, along with scattered power outages. The National Weather Service reported that the center of Dennis' huge eye crossed the Core Banks shortly before 5 p.m., just south of Cedar Island.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | J. R. MOEHRINGER and EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hurricane Bonnie looked at first like an incorrigible Southern flirt--causing a fuss, getting everyone's attention, then dancing away before doing much real harm. But late Thursday night she turned fickle, gathering strength and slamming into southeast Virginia with a late ferocity few expected. Trees were uprooted throughout the Norfolk, Va., area, and 1 million people were left without power.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive storm like Hurricane Bonnie represents the Super Bowl and Academy Awards rolled into one for the Weather Channel--the cable network that uses the promotional slogan, "If hell freezes over, you'll hear it here first." The Atlanta-based operation has already charted a ratings spike in response to the storm, with viewing levels rising sharply on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Damage estimates mounted Thursday from Hurricane Fran's deadly rampage across North Carolina last week, with the state's insurance commissioner predicting that claims would hit $1 billion by the weekend. Although winds were strongest at the coast, inland agricultural areas were hardest hit by flooding and rain. So far, farm losses of all sorts have reached $616 million, including $341 million in crop and livestock damage, according to the state's Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Storm-weary North Carolina residents nervously watched rivers rising toward flood stage on Monday in the wake of Hurricane Irene, the third hurricane to target the state since August. Irene, which left 15 people dead as it ripped through Cuba, the Bahamas and Florida, dumped nearly a foot of rain on parts of the state still struggling to recover from devastating floods caused by Hurricane Floyd last month.
NEWS
October 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Irene drenched southeastern North Carolina with more than half a foot of rain before heading out to sea Sunday night, unleashing more flooding in a region still saturated by record flood waters from Hurricane Floyd. As the storm turned east and its strongest winds moved away from land, the National Weather Service dropped hurricane warnings at 11 p.m. EDT. Tropical storm warnings remained in effect for most of the North Carolina coast.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
Residents of this town founded by ex-slaves glumly surveyed their wrecked homes Thursday for the first time in the two weeks since Hurricane Floyd's flood waters swallowed the town. Some found the damage too great to bear. Robert and Callie Suggs said goodbye to the concrete, green-and-white home they built 34 years ago and where they raised their six children. An inch-wide crack girdled the foundation. "All my life, this was a gathering place for the family," Callie Suggs said.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
More heavy rain fell on eastern North Carolina, delaying the ebb of flooding that has destroyed hundreds of homes since Hurricane Floyd, but forecasters promised a dry spell was on the way. The latest rains flooded most of the streets in Goldsboro, N.C., ruptured a dam and pushed up the Tar and Neuse rivers. In one more weather blow, the latest system spawned tornadoes that downed trees and damaged homes in the central part of the state.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Six inches of rain fell across eastern North Carolina, flooding roads and threatening homes in an area scarcely beginning its recovery from the misery brought by Hurricane Floyd. Swirling brown water again closed streets and highways, and rivers inched higher and threatened two dams. Authorities went door to door advising residents they should prepare for possible evacuation. Nearly two weeks ago, Hurricane Floyd dropped 20 inches of rain, killing at least 47 people.
NEWS
September 21, 1999 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Monday surveyed vast swaths of North Carolina still submerged beneath flood waters, nearly a week after the state took the brunt of Hurricane Floyd, while emergency crews struggled to cope with rising rivers and death tolls. One official called the mounting disaster "a 500-year flood." "No matter how much television there is," Clinton said, "it doesn't do [the flood] justice. You can't show what it feels like inside for people."
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Their neighborhoods in tatters but their resolve largely intact, residents of hurricane-battered areas turned Sunday to cleaning up formidable messes, watching swollen waterways and adjusting to life without electricity. At least six people were still reported missing. Five electric utilities reported a total of 488,000 customers still without power. Water, and especially ice, remained crucial commodities, and lines formed at stores offering supplies--many free.
NEWS
April 15, 1988
A fierce northeaster pounded the mid-Atlantic coast with heavy rains, winds near hurricane strength and waves that covered highways. At least two houses toppled into the sea and the only bridge to Hatteras Island was threatened. The storm bore down hardest on North Carolina, where whipped sea foam covered beaches like a blanket of snow. Winds gusted up to 70 m.p.h. and waves crested at nearly 25 feet off Cape Hatteras. In Sandbridge, Va.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The death toll from Hurricane Floyd and its aftermath rose to at least 49 Sunday, while a quarter-million customers from Cape Fear, N.C., to Baltimore remained without power. Along the Virginia-North Carolina border, residents watched as rivers already far above record levels climbed still higher. National Guard helicopters were used to search for stranded people and to shuttle food to stricken towns. Drinkable water had to be rushed to several counties where waste-water treatment plants failed.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After prompting the largest evacuation in U.S. history, Hurricane Floyd turned out to be all wet, sparing the East Coast a calamity but inflicting misery with heavy flooding Thursday, especially in North Carolina. Downgraded to a tropical storm at 5 p.m. EDT, Floyd was expected to dump 5 to 7 inches of rain on New York City and cross the eastern neck of Long Island overnight with winds of 65 mph before heading toward Cape Cod.
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