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Storms North Dakota

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NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Volunteers from as far as 50 miles away passed sandbags hand to hand during a steady rain Saturday, trying to protect this town's sole source of clean water from a rising flood. The southwestern Minnesota town sits where the Chippewa and Minnesota rivers merge, normally forming a stream about 100 yards across. On Saturday, the water stretched out to about a mile wide, flooding two of the three main highways into town. More than 100 families had been evacuated.
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NEWS
April 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Crews scrambled to shore up earthen dikes Tuesday as forecasters warned that rain would push the flooding Red River and its tributaries higher than predicted. As flooding problems stretched from North Dakota to the Minnesota capital, the National Weather Service said the Red could crest at least a foot higher than expected in Fargo and Grand Forks next week. The cities, hard hit by record flooding in 1997, so far have been spared widespread damage.
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NEWS
September 1, 1989
Thunderstorms battered the north-central part of the nation, flooding streets in northern Minnesota and dumping hail the size of golf balls in North Dakota. More than 9 inches of rain fell at Callaway in northwestern Minnesota, the National Weather Service said. Nearly 4 1/2 inches was reported at Park Rapids, while 3.25 inches fell at Aitkin and about 2.2 inches at Fargo-Moorhead.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Volunteers from as far as 50 miles away passed sandbags hand to hand during a steady rain Saturday, trying to protect this town's sole source of clean water from a rising flood. The southwestern Minnesota town sits where the Chippewa and Minnesota rivers merge, normally forming a stream about 100 yards across. On Saturday, the water stretched out to about a mile wide, flooding two of the three main highways into town. More than 100 families had been evacuated.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All winter long, the monster snow sat, 109 inches of it, the most in memory, congealing in backyards like enormous albino hedgerows and sprouting like whalish toadstools in shopping mall parking lots. Trudging inside 8-foot-high tunnels carved out of sidewalk slush, desperate Dakotans wondered if the worst snowfall on record would ever melt away. Now, in the first flush of a Great Plains spring, they worry it is melting too fast.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
It's not nice to fool Mother Nature, but she sure pulls some doozies on us. Ask Roger Erickson. Almost a year ago, at dusk on July 21, a freak gully washer blew across his wheat and bean farm, dumping sheets of water and hail the size of mothballs. Seven inches of rain fell in a matter of hours, and in the next few days--at what is normally a dry time of year--down came another three inches.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | Associated Press
An estimated 4,000 skiers and snowboarders were stranded for much of the weekend after 2 feet of fresh snow and avalanches blocked a canyon highway. Roads were cleared Sunday night, allowing them to leave. The highway to the Snowbird and Alta ski resorts became blocked Saturday afternoon. By late Sunday, it was open enough to let people go back home.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | Associated Press
Heavy, wind-whipped snow shut down major highways in eastern North Dakota for part of Sunday, stranding travelers and blocking streets with stuck vehicles. As much as 13 inches of snow fell overnight in Fargo and adjoining Moorhead, Minn., and 11 inches fell at Grand Forks, N.D., the National Weather Service estimated. Wind gusted to 50 mph in parts of both states. The northeastern corner of South Dakota also got 11 inches.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Crews scrambled to shore up earthen dikes Tuesday as forecasters warned that rain would push the flooding Red River and its tributaries higher than predicted. As flooding problems stretched from North Dakota to the Minnesota capital, the National Weather Service said the Red could crest at least a foot higher than expected in Fargo and Grand Forks next week. The cities, hard hit by record flooding in 1997, so far have been spared widespread damage.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All winter long, the monster snow sat, 109 inches of it, the most in memory, congealing in backyards like enormous albino hedgerows and sprouting like whalish toadstools in shopping mall parking lots. Trudging inside 8-foot-high tunnels carved out of sidewalk slush, desperate Dakotans wondered if the worst snowfall on record would ever melt away. Now, in the first flush of a Great Plains spring, they worry it is melting too fast.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | Associated Press
An estimated 4,000 skiers and snowboarders were stranded for much of the weekend after 2 feet of fresh snow and avalanches blocked a canyon highway. Roads were cleared Sunday night, allowing them to leave. The highway to the Snowbird and Alta ski resorts became blocked Saturday afternoon. By late Sunday, it was open enough to let people go back home.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | Associated Press
Heavy, wind-whipped snow shut down major highways in eastern North Dakota for part of Sunday, stranding travelers and blocking streets with stuck vehicles. As much as 13 inches of snow fell overnight in Fargo and adjoining Moorhead, Minn., and 11 inches fell at Grand Forks, N.D., the National Weather Service estimated. Wind gusted to 50 mph in parts of both states. The northeastern corner of South Dakota also got 11 inches.
NEWS
September 1, 1989
Thunderstorms battered the north-central part of the nation, flooding streets in northern Minnesota and dumping hail the size of golf balls in North Dakota. More than 9 inches of rain fell at Callaway in northwestern Minnesota, the National Weather Service said. Nearly 4 1/2 inches was reported at Park Rapids, while 3.25 inches fell at Aitkin and about 2.2 inches at Fargo-Moorhead.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
It's not nice to fool Mother Nature, but she sure pulls some doozies on us. Ask Roger Erickson. Almost a year ago, at dusk on July 21, a freak gully washer blew across his wheat and bean farm, dumping sheets of water and hail the size of mothballs. Seven inches of rain fell in a matter of hours, and in the next few days--at what is normally a dry time of year--down came another three inches.
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