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Storms Northwestern United States

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NEWS
December 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than three inches of rain soaked the Pacific Northwest, causing flooding and mudslides in western Washington that forced the evacuation of about 50 people and closed highways and schools. The Skokomish River reached 2 1/2 feet above flood stage near Potlatch, and the Satsop rose to three feet above flood stage at Satsop, west of Olympia, the National Weather Service said. Helicopters and a small Hovercraft were used to evacuate about 50 people from the Skokomish River Valley.
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NEWS
December 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Three days of driving rain and melted snow triggered floods and mudslides in Oregon and Washington, blocking roads and stranding residents, authorities said. As downpour gave way to drizzle Tuesday, the flood waters retreated in this coastal dairy town, reducing pastures to mud and choking roads with tree trunks, tires and other debris. The swollen Wilson River finally dipped below flood stage, and workers cleared away the mudslide debris from busy U.S. Highway 101.
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NEWS
January 11, 1990 | From United Press International
A major rainstorm in the Pacific Northwest sent rivers surging over their banks Wednesday, routing thousands from their homes, shutting down a dozen major highways and causing at least two deaths, officials said. Rushing waters spilled over an earthen dike on the Skookumchuk River in western Washington, closing a 12-mile stretch of Interstate 5 and forcing the evacuation of more than 3,000 residents in Centralia, said Lewis County emergency services specialist Bob Berg.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 80,000 people remained without power across the South in the wake of a wintry Christmas Eve storm, including 66,000 in Virginia. At least three Virginians died of the cold in their homes, and traffic deaths were blamed on the weather across the South. A utility worker died in Alabama when he touched a live wire. In the Pacific Northwest, a storm caused widespread power outages and filled streams to overflowing.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Storms on Monday brought heavy rains and 100-m.p.h. winds to the Northwest. Utility lines were ripped down, houses were smashed and fallen trees and rockslides blocked highways. Gusts up to 107 m.p.h. toppled nearly 100 trees and ripped off roofs on the Washington State University campus at Pullman, near the Idaho border.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
High winds battered the Pacific Northwest during the weekend, capsizing boats and pulling down power lines. Six people were killed, and four were missing. Coast Guard crews answered about 60 distress calls in Washington's inland waterways as winds blew up to 60 m.p.h. Boats were overturned or washed ashore, and Coast Guard Lt. Jim Beckham said two sailboats sank. Their occupants were rescued.
NEWS
January 16, 1989
A fierce winter storm off the Pacific Coast battered the northern Cascade Mountains of Oregon with heavy snow, while rivers in the Southeast overflowed their banks after torrential rains. Rain doused the central and northern Pacific Coast as a cold front moved through the Northwest, and snow fell in interior Washington state and Oregon. Between 1 and 3 inches fell in eastern Oregon. The National Weather Service posted a heavy snow warning for the northern Cascades in Oregon.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Thousands of work crews took to the streets across Georgia and Alabama on Sunday to clean up from a barrage of powerful thunderstorms and tornadoes that wrecked dozens of homes and knocked out power to 600,000 utility customers. Some 38,000 homes in Alabama and 14,000 in Georgia remained without power Sunday as utility crews worked to clear away fallen tree limbs and replace downed power lines, authorities said.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 80,000 people remained without power across the South in the wake of a wintry Christmas Eve storm, including 66,000 in Virginia. At least three Virginians died of the cold in their homes, and traffic deaths were blamed on the weather across the South. A utility worker died in Alabama when he touched a live wire. In the Pacific Northwest, a storm caused widespread power outages and filled streams to overflowing.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | From United Press International
Winter storms dumped a mixture of snow and rain throughout the Pacific Northwest and into the Rockies on Saturday, while floodwaters rose in the Louisiana bayous and more snow fell in parts of the Midwest. The National Weather Service said that a slow-moving storm dumped up to a foot of snow in the Washington Cascades. Rain fell along the coasts of Washington and Oregon. Winds increased to gale force in parts of the region.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Storms began dying down Wednesday and the new year brought hope that the worst was over for the weary Northwest, where a week of heavy snow and rain followed by record warmth has swelled rivers and created dangerous mudslides. "Things are definitely beginning to taper off," National Weather Service forecaster Sten Tjaden said. But the break came too late for many. Ron Ricker's Shell gas station collapsed into a sinkhole during the night in suburban Lake Forest Park.
NEWS
January 1, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Already battered by two winter storms, then deluged by rain and melting snow, a soggy Northwest was soaked again Tuesday by the leading edge of a new Pacific storm that threatened wind gusts up to 80 mph and more flooding. Washington Gov. Mike Lowry proclaimed a state of emergency in four more counties, bringing the number where emergencies have been declared in the state to 19 since a series of punishing winter storms hit last week, causing widespread property damage, flooding and mudslides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A California tradition--a Rose Parade without rain--is expected to hold through another new year as Southern California appears to have dodged a rainy fusillade from the Pacific Northwest and Hawaii. The weather along the parade route was somewhat damp Tuesday night, but forecasters predicted that the drizzle would stop by early this morning, with only a 20% chance of light showers throughout the day. Meteorologist Jon Erdman of WeatherData Inc.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
The Northwest was pummeled by its second major storm in less than a week Sunday as 2 feet of snow, heavy rain and high winds blocked major highways, collapsed roofs and closed the Space Needle. Washington Gov. Mike Lowry declared a state of emergency in 12 counties, citing widespread destruction from freezing rain, snow and flooding. He also activated the National Guard. Blizzard warnings were posted for northwestern Washington, where snow was piled up by bone-chilling 90-mph gusts.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A powerful storm that dumped snow and freezing rain across the Northwest left more than 300,000 homes and businesses without power Friday in Washington and Oregon, halted travel and closed highway passes through the Cascade Range. Downtown Seattle was a virtual ghost town, with almost no traffic and few people. At least three deaths were blamed on the storm. A Portland, Ore.
NEWS
February 10, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Northwest emerged from its worst flooding in decades on Friday, you couldn't get to Clatskanie: U.S. 30 was buried under landslides on both sides of town. You couldn't call there: The phones were out. You couldn't get a drink of tap water: The main feeder lines were knocked out. You could walk downtown, except it was under 2 feet of water.
NEWS
January 1, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Already battered by two winter storms, then deluged by rain and melting snow, a soggy Northwest was soaked again Tuesday by the leading edge of a new Pacific storm that threatened wind gusts up to 80 mph and more flooding. Washington Gov. Mike Lowry proclaimed a state of emergency in four more counties, bringing the number where emergencies have been declared in the state to 19 since a series of punishing winter storms hit last week, causing widespread property damage, flooding and mudslides.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mighty Columbia and Willamette rivers raged through Oregon and southern Washington on Thursday, threatening downtown Portland, sweeping into low-lying areas and forcing thousands of people to flee in the region's worst flooding in three decades. Dozens of landslides sent homes, apartments and cars plowing down hillsides and closed off at least three sections of Interstate 5 and Interstate 84.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than three inches of rain soaked the Pacific Northwest, causing flooding and mudslides in western Washington that forced the evacuation of about 50 people and closed highways and schools. The Skokomish River reached 2 1/2 feet above flood stage near Potlatch, and the Satsop rose to three feet above flood stage at Satsop, west of Olympia, the National Weather Service said. Helicopters and a small Hovercraft were used to evacuate about 50 people from the Skokomish River Valley.
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