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Storms Oklahoma

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NEWS
July 3, 1987 | From United Press International
Hundreds of residents fled floods that swamped homes, businesses and submerged roads under six feet of water Thursday in north-central Ohio, and Gov. Richard F. Celeste declared a state of emergency in four counties. Search parties used boats to rescue people stranded by the floods fueled by downpours from a line of thunderstorms that rumbled through the Ohio Valley toward the Northeast.
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SPORTS
June 15, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First-round play in the 101st U.S. Open was interrupted Thursday by a tornado watch, a flood warning and a senior moment. The meteorologists saw the weather coming, but no one could have predicted Hale. You could say it was a strange day. When play was suspended at 3:39 p.m. local time, Hale Irwin, 56, was tucked safely in the clubhouse after shooting a three-under-par 67 to lead all finishers.
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NEWS
May 5, 1999 | J. PAT CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS. This first-person account is from an Associated Press photographer who covered the storm and captured the dramatic picture of a woman and her daughters huddling under an overpass, shown on A1 of Tuesday's Los Angeles Times
I drove into the heart of the storm, my police scanner screaming, the radio broadcasting warnings of the approaching storm. The sky turned midnight dark and hail pounded the roof of my car. Then the rain stopped and there was no more hail. Just quiet. An eerie quiet. Suddenly, debris flew and I saw it--the funnel cloud, a quarter- to a half-mile away, straddling the highway. I have chased tornadoes for a quarter-century, but this was the first I had seen on the ground.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | Associated Press
Tens of thousands of people shivered without heat again Friday, nearly a week after a Christmas ice storm devastated parts of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. From 750,000 to as many as 1 million people--at least a quarter of Arkansas' population--lost power after the storm, Gov. Mike Huckabee said as he looked at street after street littered with splintered, ice-caked trees. About 135,000 homes and businesses remained in the dark Friday. "We've never had a storm like this," Huckabee said.
NEWS
January 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Patients of Anderson's Chiropractic Clinic who had been kept away from their appointments by nearly a foot of snow arrived by the wagonload Friday. Because of the snow, only two people could show up on Thursday. On Friday, the clinic arranged for a team and wagon to transport 30 to 40 patients to and from the clinic. "It was kind of chilly, but we had fun," said Patricia Bethel of Bristow, one of those who made the trip in the wagon pulled by two horses.
NEWS
June 13, 1989
Fierce thunderstorms raked northern Texas and Oklahoma, uprooting trees and knocking down power lines with winds of up to 76 m.p.h. The storms, born in humid and unstable air ahead of a cold front, rumbled toward the lower Mississippi Valley, prompting forecasters to post a tornado watch for much of Arkansas. Early in the day, wind gusts were clocked at 76 m.p.h. at Wichita Falls, Tex., 62 m.p.h. at Tulsa, Okla., and 60 m.p.h. in Oklahoma City, the National Weather Service said. Trees were felled by 60-m.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | from United Press International
The swollen Arkansas River, fed by hard rains and overflowing lakes and reservoirs in Oklahoma, pushed relentlessly through Arkansas on Saturday, inundating homes in its path toward the Mississippi River. Gary Talley, spokesman for Arkansas Emergency Services in Little Rock, said the river was expected to cause serious flooding through Tuesday as flood crests move downstream from the Ft. Smith-Van Buren area on the Oklahoma border.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | Reuters
Homeowners hit by Oklahoma's deadly tornadoes in May will be offered federal money to build safe rooms that could have saved many of the 44 people killed in the storm, officials said Friday. In a $10-million pilot safety program that could be extended to other parts of the U.S., the Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would reimburse homeowners up to $2,000 for the cost of installing a shelter, which can run from $2,000 to $8,000.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Heavy rain on Wednesday produced a threat of flooding in Oklahoma, while temperatures dropped below zero in Wyoming, weather officials said. Overnight rainfall in Oklahoma included 9.32 inches at Grandfield, 8.06 inches at Trousdale, 7.68 inches at Marlow and 5.62 inches at Cox City, the National Weather Service reported. Hail also fell at Jones and Luther, Okla. Flash flood watches were in effect over large sections of Oklahoma and Texas.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
Storms plastered New England with heavy snow Friday, and Oklahoma officials searched for a little boy missing after flash floods that killed two other children. A tornado touched down in Texas, ripping the roof from a home. In the Northwest, boats were ripped from their moorings and thousands lost power as wind blew up to 40 m.p.h. through the Puget Sound area. The tornado tore the roof off a house in Van Vleck, Tex.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | Reuters
Homeowners hit by Oklahoma's deadly tornadoes in May will be offered federal money to build safe rooms that could have saved many of the 44 people killed in the storm, officials said Friday. In a $10-million pilot safety program that could be extended to other parts of the U.S., the Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would reimburse homeowners up to $2,000 for the cost of installing a shelter, which can run from $2,000 to $8,000.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Folks here found out Wednesday that the monstrous black funnel cloud that pulverized their small community rated an F-5, a classification that outstrips "severe" or even "dangerous." The F-5 is known simply as "incredible." The tornado ripped acres of grass out of the ground, tossed a hefty dump truck a good quarter-mile down the road and blasted the doors off the storm cellar where Keith Fritzmeyer and his neighbors were huddled, praying.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | J. PAT CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS. This first-person account is from an Associated Press photographer who covered the storm and captured the dramatic picture of a woman and her daughters huddling under an overpass, shown on A1 of Tuesday's Los Angeles Times
I drove into the heart of the storm, my police scanner screaming, the radio broadcasting warnings of the approaching storm. The sky turned midnight dark and hail pounded the roof of my car. Then the rain stopped and there was no more hail. Just quiet. An eerie quiet. Suddenly, debris flew and I saw it--the funnel cloud, a quarter- to a half-mile away, straddling the highway. I have chased tornadoes for a quarter-century, but this was the first I had seen on the ground.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
Tornadoes tore through Oklahoma and Kansas on Monday night, wiping out whole neighborhoods, killing at least 36 people and injuring hundreds. Police and emergency workers combed through the debris, searching for survivors. Crumpled cars littered highways. "We are getting so many injuries, we are just tagging them and bringing them in," said Shara Findley, a spokeswoman for Hillcrest Health Center in Oklahoma City. "We're getting everything you can think of. It's real chaotic." Oklahoma Gov.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | From Reuters
The spring weekend brought tornadoes to Oklahoma and Kansas and record rainfall to much of New England. Through it all, no serious injuries were reported. A tornado ripped through Oklahoma City on Saturday night, tossing cars, trucks and boats through the air and cutting power lines. Three tornadoes struck north-central and northeast Kansas too, uprooting trees and downing power lines, and one did extensive damage to the Sabetha business district, officials said Sunday.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | from Associated Press
A huge complex of storms that has killed at least 23 people in Texas and Oklahoma produced avalanche conditions Monday in Colorado, deep snow and flooding in Wyoming and South Dakota, and thunderstorms that killed two people in Missouri. Monday night, an emergency room at a New Orleans hospital had to be evacuated because of flooding. In some New Orleans neighborhoods, police used boats to evacuate residents because the water was too deep for vehicles.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Floodwaters gushed through Texas on Thursday after more than 24 hours of thunderstorms, forcing the evacuation of two towns and sending campers to the roofs of their vehicles. At least three people drowned in Texas, and two were missing after the storms, which were photographed by the space shuttle Discovery's astronauts orbiting 381 miles above Earth. One family was rescued from a tree. Flooding in nearby south-central Oklahoma also forced evacuations and closed highways.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Tornadoes swept across parts of southern Oklahoma on Monday, destroying houses, downing power lines, uprooting trees and leaving nearly a dozen people injured. The National Weather Service said at least nine twisters touched down. Damage was reported in the communities of Fittstown, Tupelo and Kingston. The heaviest damage was reported in Kingston, a community of 1,100, about 130 miles southeast of Oklahoma City, near the Texas line. Twenty-eight homes or businesses were damaged or destroyed.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
Flooded Oklahomans began returning home in rowboats and hip waders Monday after heavy weekend rains soaked the Plains. Schools were closed because of flooding in Kansas and Minnesota, and street flooding persisted in Iowa and Missouri. "Got some waterfront resort property I'll sell you," Bob Hertensen said as he tied a boat to the railing of his house in Kingfisher, Okla. "Fish right off your front porch."
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Heavy rain on Wednesday produced a threat of flooding in Oklahoma, while temperatures dropped below zero in Wyoming, weather officials said. Overnight rainfall in Oklahoma included 9.32 inches at Grandfield, 8.06 inches at Trousdale, 7.68 inches at Marlow and 5.62 inches at Cox City, the National Weather Service reported. Hail also fell at Jones and Luther, Okla. Flash flood watches were in effect over large sections of Oklahoma and Texas.
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