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Storms Puerto Rico

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NEWS
September 19, 1989 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Hugo, a relentless killer now, ravaged Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands on Monday, smashing houses and cars like plastic toys beneath its heavy boot. The storm stomped through San Juan a few hours after dawn on Monday, throwing down torrents of rain and turning the morning skies to charcoal. It left as many as 300,000 people homeless. "That is our best estimate now," said Jaime B. Fuster, Puerto Rico's resident commissioner in Washington.
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NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Packing 115 mph winds and torrential rains, Hurricane Lenny careened past the Dominican Republic on a rare west-to-east course aimed directly at Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. At 10 p.m. EST, Lenny was 170 miles south-southwest of San Juan, speeding east-northeast at 16 mph. Late Tuesday, Lenny became a Category 3, designating a dangerous storm with winds from 111 mph to 130 mph. The storm was expected to hit Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands this morning.
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NEWS
September 21, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
President Bush ordered more than 1,000 military police, federal marshals and FBI agents to St. Croix on Wednesday as the Coast Guard began evacuating residents and tourists terrorized by violence on the streets and looting in stores and homes shattered by Hurricane Hugo. In a wave of lawlessness that spread across the island, eyewitnesses reported looting by men and women, children and the elderly, even police and National Guardsmen. Armed gangs were reported roaming the streets.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
At a shelter in Puerto Rico last week, Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke of a $39-million U.S. grant to rebuild hurricane-ravaged homes. But two weeks after Hurricane Georges pummeled this U.S. territory, thousands still languish in schools, community centers and the homes of family and friends--and her pledge looks like a drop in the bucket. The cost of getting the homeless into homes will be far greater than virtually anyone had imagined, probably well beyond $1 billion. And U.S.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The two dominant home and automobile insurers in the Carolinas said Tuesday that they expect to be hit with about $600 million in claims from Hurricane Hugo. Such heavy losses suggest that the storm will be the most expensive ever for the insurance industry. State Farm Insurance Co. expects claims as high as $400 million in South Carolina, where it insures one out of every five homes, spokesman Jerry Parsons said. The Bloomington, Ill.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | BOB SECTER and MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writers
Desperately needed emergency power generators, water purifiers and medical supplies arrived in the hurricane-devastated Caribbean on Friday, but officials pleaded for more help--faster. "The big effort now is to put the people in economic condition to rebuild their houses," Puerto Rican Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon declared. "Part of the desperation of the people is that they are continuing (to stay) in shelters." In the U.S. Virgin Islands, some officials on St.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Cold rain poured on this city Monday like an icy slap to the wounded, splashing through shattered roofs, soaking broken belongings and chilling the homeless. It added new misery to the devastation of Hurricane Hugo--as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of damage. Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. pleaded on national television for aid ranging from baby formula to bulldozers. He said: "We need everything." Electricity was restored at hospitals.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ
The Orange County chapter of the American Red Cross is accepting monetary donations to aid relief efforts in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, where Hurricane Hugo has inflicted extensive damage. Donations also are being accepted in anticipation of any damage on the Atlantic seaboard, chapter spokeswoman Joan Mueller said. The Red Cross also urges the donation of blood to increase current supplies in case the hurricane causes serious injuries in the United States.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The City of Los Angeles will dispatch several experts from the Department of Water and Power to Puerto Rico early next week to help repair damage caused by Hurricane Hugo, Mayor Tom Bradley announced Friday. "Puerto Rico suffered a tremendous devastation to their power system," Bradley said at a City Hall press conference. "They desperately need our help." After an advance team arrives in Puerto Rico to assess the damage, as many as 20 more people will be sent to help, according to Barnard V.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Relief efforts for victims of Hurricane Hugo in Puerto Rico are being coordinated by the Department of Puerto Rican Community Affairs in the United States. The agency, at 304 Park Ave. South, New York, N.Y., 10010, has a hot line for news and for people wishing to donate money: (212) 473-4788. In addition, the federal Interior Department has established a 24-hour telephone number for people seeking information about conditions in the Virgin Islands. The number is (202) 343-6816.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most Orange County residents kept track of Hurricane Georges on television, Julio Ortiz reached out and touched someone--several someones, in fact. The La Habra resident is a licensed ham-radio operator--a hobby he embraced after losing his eyesight nearly eight years ago. In the past few weeks he has helped put dozens of hurricane victims in touch with loved ones in California, Texas and New Mexico.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Hortense lashed Puerto Rico with punishing winds and torrents of rain Tuesday, killing eight people as it snapped trees and power lines, swelled rivers and collapsed hillsides. Half the dead were children, including an 8-year-old girl swept from her father's arms as her 13-year-old sister drowned.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | from Times Wire Services
Residents on the south coast of Puerto Rico braced Sunday for the impact of Tropical Storm Cindy, which killed two people on the Caribbean island of Martinique. The storm, which carried heavy rains and the threat of flash floods and mudslides, could become a hurricane by today, Bob Sheets of the National Hurricane Center in Coral Gables, Fla., said. Officials on Martinique said two people died and 10 were injured as Cindy swept through.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
When Hurricane Hugo ripped through this tropical rain forest last September, much of its flora and fauna perished. But the storm set the stage for some surprising reincarnations. "Plants and trees we haven't seen for years are suddenly shooting up," said Aeril Lugo, 47, director of the U.S. Forest Service's Institute of Tropical Forestry here. With winds as high as 212 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The two dominant home and automobile insurers in the Carolinas said Tuesday that they expect to be hit with about $600 million in claims from Hurricane Hugo. Such heavy losses suggest that the storm will be the most expensive ever for the insurance industry. State Farm Insurance Co. expects claims as high as $400 million in South Carolina, where it insures one out of every five homes, spokesman Jerry Parsons said. The Bloomington, Ill.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Cold rain poured on this city Monday like an icy slap to the wounded, splashing through shattered roofs, soaking broken belongings and chilling the homeless. It added new misery to the devastation of Hurricane Hugo--as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of damage. Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. pleaded on national television for aid ranging from baby formula to bulldozers. He said: "We need everything." Electricity was restored at hospitals.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
A tropical depression churned over the Dominican Republic after dumping heavy rains on Puerto Rico, where it killed three people and left 485 homeless. The depression, with maximum winds of 35 m.p.h., struck land in the Dominican Republic after passing 150 miles south of Puerto Rico, according to the National Weather Service in San Juan. The National Hurricane Center in Miami said the weather system was headed west-northwest at 15 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most Orange County residents kept track of Hurricane Georges on television, Julio Ortiz reached out and touched someone--several someones, in fact. The La Habra resident is a licensed ham-radio operator--a hobby he embraced after losing his eyesight nearly eight years ago. In the past few weeks he has helped put dozens of hurricane victims in touch with loved ones in California, Texas and New Mexico.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The City of Los Angeles will dispatch several experts from the Department of Water and Power to Puerto Rico early next week to help repair damage caused by Hurricane Hugo, Mayor Tom Bradley announced Friday. "Puerto Rico suffered a tremendous devastation to their power system," Bradley said at a City Hall press conference. "They desperately need our help." After an advance team arrives in Puerto Rico to assess the damage, as many as 20 more people will be sent to help, according to Barnard V.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | BOB SECTER and MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writers
Desperately needed emergency power generators, water purifiers and medical supplies arrived in the hurricane-devastated Caribbean on Friday, but officials pleaded for more help--faster. "The big effort now is to put the people in economic condition to rebuild their houses," Puerto Rican Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon declared. "Part of the desperation of the people is that they are continuing (to stay) in shelters." In the U.S. Virgin Islands, some officials on St.
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