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Storms San Francisco

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NEWS
October 24, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to avoid the gridlock that threatened to paralyze freeways and bridges leading into quake-stricken San Francisco, thousands of determined commuters took to the seas Monday, boarding a flotilla of ferries that carried them on hair-raising journeys across a storm-tossed bay. While a few passengers seemed to consider the rough ride in driving wind and rain something of an adventure, others nearly lost their breakfast and some were drenched when towering waves swept across the ferries' decks.
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NEWS
November 7, 1994 | Associated Press
A winter storm began to fade Sunday, after bringing torrential rain to parts of Northern California while causing mudslides and minor flooding. The storm set a 24-hour record for rainfall in San Francisco, flooded roads and basements throughout the Bay Area and caused two minor mudslides in Tiburon, police and fire officials said. San Francisco saw a record rainfall of 6.16 inches for the 24-hour period ending Sunday morning, meteorologist David MacPherson said.
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NEWS
October 24, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fiercely blowing rainstorm tossed ferryboats and snarled the freeways, but commuting to and from work in the Bay Area Monday--although mighty unpleasant--was actually manageable as many quake-shaken people heeded warnings to stay at home. "We've got gale winds, heavy rains, and heavy traffic--your basic nightmare conditions," California Highway Patrol Officer John Lash said as the morning commute began before dawn. "Somebody up there doesn't like us."
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to avoid the gridlock that threatened to paralyze freeways and bridges leading into quake-stricken San Francisco, thousands of determined commuters took to the seas Monday, boarding a flotilla of ferries that carried them on hair-raising journeys across a storm-tossed bay. While a few passengers seemed to consider the rough ride in driving wind and rain something of an adventure, others nearly lost their breakfast and some were drenched when towering waves swept across the ferries' decks.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | Associated Press
A winter storm began to fade Sunday, after bringing torrential rain to parts of Northern California while causing mudslides and minor flooding. The storm set a 24-hour record for rainfall in San Francisco, flooded roads and basements throughout the Bay Area and caused two minor mudslides in Tiburon, police and fire officials said. San Francisco saw a record rainfall of 6.16 inches for the 24-hour period ending Sunday morning, meteorologist David MacPherson said.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writers
Bay Area quake victims, including more than 6,500 still displaced from their homes, were beset by new miseries Friday in the form of falling temperatures, the threat of rain and mounting damages, but they were promised quick federal relief by a grim President Bush. Any relief will be welcomed as more careful study of the area struck by Tuesday's 6.9-magnitude quake--and more than 1,500 aftershocks--pushed conservative damage estimates to more than $4.2 billion.
SPORTS
October 18, 1989 | DAN HAFNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only other World Series held in San Francisco's Candlestick Park was also struck by a natural disaster and ended up being the longest in history--13 days. Twenty-seven years ago, the damage and loss of life were more widespread geographically, as a killer storm battered the Pacific Coast from Northern California to British Columbia, leaving postponed baseball games as mere footnotes to the tragedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores, Ruben Vives and Ari Bloomekatz
As a powerful dual storm system moves into California on Wednesday, weather forecasters say Los Angeles County can expect to see its share of the rain sometime after 6 p.m. Rainfall from the first storm is expected to last until Thursday morning, said Stuart Seto of the National Weather Service. It could bring as much as a quarter-inch of rain to L.A. County. A second, stronger storm is expected Friday morning, Seto said. That storm could bring up to 1 to 2 inches of rain, and as much as 4 inches in the mountains.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fiercely blowing rainstorm tossed ferryboats and snarled the freeways, but commuting to and from work in the Bay Area Monday--although mighty unpleasant--was actually manageable as many quake-shaken people heeded warnings to stay at home. "We've got gale winds, heavy rains, and heavy traffic--your basic nightmare conditions," California Highway Patrol Officer John Lash said as the morning commute began before dawn. "Somebody up there doesn't like us."
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writers
Bay Area quake victims, including more than 6,500 still displaced from their homes, were beset by new miseries Friday in the form of falling temperatures, the threat of rain and mounting damages, but they were promised quick federal relief by a grim President Bush. Any relief will be welcomed as more careful study of the area struck by Tuesday's 6.9-magnitude quake--and more than 1,500 aftershocks--pushed conservative damage estimates to more than $4.2 billion.
SPORTS
October 18, 1989 | DAN HAFNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only other World Series held in San Francisco's Candlestick Park was also struck by a natural disaster and ended up being the longest in history--13 days. Twenty-seven years ago, the damage and loss of life were more widespread geographically, as a killer storm battered the Pacific Coast from Northern California to British Columbia, leaving postponed baseball games as mere footnotes to the tragedy.
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