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NEWS
November 6, 1988
Thunderstorms in the South spawned tornadoes in North Carolina and Florida, where one woman was killed by a twister that destroyed her mobile home, while heavy snow fell in the far northern reaches of Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. In north Florida, an early morning tornado lashed across Madison County, demolishing four homes, authorities said. Officials identified the fatality as Debbie Rutherford, 28. Her husband and three children were injured.
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NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Snow, sleet and frozen rain damaged a year's worth of South Carolina's timber harvest last month, making it the most damaging storm in the region since 1989, officials reported. About 11% of the forestland was significantly affected by the pre-Valentine's Day storm, which left an inch of ice across half of the state. Though most of the $360 million in damage was considered “light” by the South Carolina Forestry Commission because some of it could be salvaged, the agency declared a disaster and called on timber companies Wednesday to save as much as they could.
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NEWS
June 29, 1986
Thunderstorms left behind by Hurricane Bonnie drenched the lower Mississippi Valley, and severe storms rolled across Minnesota and Iowa. The storms battered Arkansas, northeastern Louisiana and central Mississippi. In Union County, Ark., heavy rains washed out roads and bridges. "We've got secondary roads and bridges washed out all over the county," said Deputy Sheriff Rance Nation Jr.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Matt Pearce and Saba Hamedy, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
An unusual blanket of snow across the South triggered epic traffic snarls and stranded hundreds of students at their schools Tuesday. LATEST: Drivers trapped, kids sleep at school Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia and Alabama struggled to cope with 2 to 4 inches of snow, while Atlanta's 3 inches led to six-hour commutes -- at least for drivers who didn't abandon their cars on the slippery roads. "I just decided to get ... out and walk home like the rest of the people.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Strong thunderstorms shook parts of the South on Monday, generating tornadoes in Georgia that demolished a fire station, blew mobile homes off their foundations and ripped out trees and power lines. Two tornadoes touched down in rural Lowndes County in southern Georgia, heavily damaging several homes. No injuries were reported. "We've had extensive damage. There's been quite a few houses which are wiped out completely," Lowndes County Sheriff's Deputy Robert Rudd said.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Matt Pearce and Saba Hamedy, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
An unusual blanket of snow across the South triggered epic traffic snarls and stranded hundreds of students at their schools Tuesday. LATEST: Drivers trapped, kids sleep at school Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia and Alabama struggled to cope with 2 to 4 inches of snow, while Atlanta's 3 inches led to six-hour commutes -- at least for drivers who didn't abandon their cars on the slippery roads. "I just decided to get ... out and walk home like the rest of the people.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Snow, sleet and frozen rain damaged a year's worth of South Carolina's timber harvest last month, making it the most damaging storm in the region since 1989, officials reported. About 11% of the forestland was significantly affected by the pre-Valentine's Day storm, which left an inch of ice across half of the state. Though most of the $360 million in damage was considered “light” by the South Carolina Forestry Commission because some of it could be salvaged, the agency declared a disaster and called on timber companies Wednesday to save as much as they could.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
The second ice storm in a week made highways treacherous Saturday, leaving the pavement so slippery in places people couldn't stand, let alone drive. Cars slid into police cars and trucks trying to clear the roads, and ice-covered overpasses and interchanges were shut down across the state. Temperatures, however, were expected to climb into the 40s today. "It just happened so suddenly," said state Department of Transportation spokeswoman Kim Law.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council, beset by factional rivalries in recent years, on Tuesday pledged a new spirit of cooperation after last week's bitterly contested recall election. With some expecting a last stand by former Mayor Stan Quintana, who was thrown out of office by voters last week, the four remaining councilmen uneventfully certified the results of the Feb. 5 special recall election and reorganized the council.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | from Associated Press
Strong thunderstorms in parts of Louisiana and Arkansas took the roof off a building, downed trees and power lines and left hail up to 3 inches deep. A cold front advancing through the central United States brought up to 4 inches of wet, heavy snow to eastern North Dakota, winds gusting to 49 m.p.h. in Sioux Falls, S.D., and gusts to 46 m.p.h. in Ord, Columbus and Kearney, Neb. Showers and thunderstorms fell over southern Arkansas, northern Louisiana and northwestern Mississippi.
WORLD
June 10, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
An attack by militants on a checkpoint in a lawless tribal area near the Afghan border early Thursday underscores how overstretched the Pakistani military is and why it is resisting U.S. pressure to conduct a massive offensive in North Waziristan, analysts said Thursday. About 100 insurgents stormed the checkpoint in the environs of Marobi village in South Waziristan with rockets and machine guns, sparking a three-hour gunfight that killed eight soldiers and wounded 12 others. Local officials said 10 militants were also killed and five wounded in the battle, figures disputed by a spokesman for the outlawed Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan group who said none of its fighters were killed and that two had received bullet wounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2003 | Cynthia Daniels, Times Staff Writer
Laticia Thompson usually hits the mall right after Thanksgiving in search of gifts for her three children. But this year, the 32-year-old single mother will spend her Christmas Club money to repair her South Los Angeles home, damaged three weeks ago by a freak rainstorm. The same storm flooded neighbor Edgar Tista's home and ruined his 1991 Mustang. Tista, 26, said he has no money to fix up his residence or remove the foul odor left by the rainwater.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Freak winter storms paralyzed swathes of southeastern Europe on Saturday, claiming five lives and prompting Greece and Bulgaria to declare states of emergency in some areas. The storms blanketed much of the region with snow, blocking roads and disrupting flights for a second day. In southwestern Turkey, two men froze to death, Turkish television reported. Two others died in icy temperatures in Istanbul.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
The second ice storm in a week made highways treacherous Saturday, leaving the pavement so slippery in places people couldn't stand, let alone drive. Cars slid into police cars and trucks trying to clear the roads, and ice-covered overpasses and interchanges were shut down across the state. Temperatures, however, were expected to climb into the 40s today. "It just happened so suddenly," said state Department of Transportation spokeswoman Kim Law.
SPORTS
March 10, 1998 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two players were suspended. One of them then quit for good in February. The team moved on, battled harder and made the NCAA tournament field of 64. Oh, and the 11th-seeded Miami Hurricanes' first-round opponent Friday at the Georgia Dome had some problems this season too.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | H.G. REZA and DAVE LESHER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of harsh winter storms gave most state residents a brief break Sunday after hitting Baja California with a vengeance, killing at least 13 people in widespread flash flooding throughout the border area. The overnight storm hit the cities of Tijuana and Rosarito hardest, forcing the evacuation of 220 people in Tijuana alone. An estimated 500 others were trapped in their homes by flood waters, which had destroyed or damaged at least 300 residences, officials said.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
A powerful snowstorm blew out of the Rockies and pummeled the Southern Plains on Tuesday, closing hundreds of miles of highways. In Amarillo, Tex., 200 vehicles were involved in a series of early morning pileups on snow-covered Interstate 40, but no deaths were reported, police said. Two motorists were killed in weather-related traffic accidents Tuesday elsewhere in the Texas Panhandle. The storm also was blamed for the death of an 11-year-old girl in a Colorado sledding accident.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
The weekend storm that was expected to pack a wallop turned into a dud, sparing fire-ravaged communities any major problems. Firefighters took advantage of the calm weather Sunday to wash their trucks. County fire crews had their sandbags in place a couple of weeks ago, and they held in the rains, a spokeswoman for the Fire Department said. Weather officials reported that the Civic Center received only a 0.08 inch of rain as the storm veered south to Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1997 | DAVID REYES and LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A storm that threatened to dump up to 2 inches of rain on Orange County instead veered toward Tijuana on Tuesday, but only after unleashing at least one towering funnel cloud on the Irvine Spectrum entertainment complex. The 400-foot mini tornado touched down about 12:45 p.m., lifting up chain-link fencing and heavy lumber and tossing them "like toothpicks" against parked cars near a Spectrum construction site at the junction of the Santa Ana and San Diego freeways.
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