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Storms South Carolina

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NEWS
September 23, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Less than half a mile of Intracoastal Waterway lies between the South Carolina mainland and its beachfront neighbors here, Sullivans Island and the Isle of Palms. But, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo on Friday, that gulf had come to seem enormous. Across the water lay the hint of disaster: Nowhere had the mighty storm struck with such devastating force. Up to 20 citizens who had defied orders and waited out the storm on the oceanfront could be in grave peril. No one knew their fate.
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NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Snow, sleet and frozen rain damaged a year's worth of South Carolina's timber harvest last month, making it the most damaging storm in the region since 1989, officials reported. About 11% of the forestland was significantly affected by the pre-Valentine's Day storm, which left an inch of ice across half of the state. Though most of the $360 million in damage was considered “light” by the South Carolina Forestry Commission because some of it could be salvaged, the agency declared a disaster and called on timber companies Wednesday to save as much as they could.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The two dominant home and automobile insurers in the Carolinas said Tuesday that they expect to be hit with about $600 million in claims from Hurricane Hugo. Such heavy losses suggest that the storm will be the most expensive ever for the insurance industry. State Farm Insurance Co. expects claims as high as $400 million in South Carolina, where it insures one out of every five homes, spokesman Jerry Parsons said. The Bloomington, Ill.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive storm like Hurricane Bonnie represents the Super Bowl and Academy Awards rolled into one for the Weather Channel--the cable network that uses the promotional slogan, "If hell freezes over, you'll hear it here first." The Atlanta-based operation has already charted a ratings spike in response to the storm, with viewing levels rising sharply on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | Associated Press
A tornado spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Beryl smashed through town Tuesday, trapping people for hours in a caved-in shopping center and injuring at least 35. From 40 to 50 buildings were damaged or destroyed, City Administrator L. C. Greene said. "It came by swirling trash, metal, limbs everywhere, then it just stopped and then went on. You could see big old puffs of blue as it went through" knocking out electrical transformers, said Phillip Butler, a grocery store employee. Gov.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Cold rain poured on this city Monday like an icy slap to the wounded, splashing through shattered roofs, soaking broken belongings and chilling the homeless. It added new misery to the devastation of Hurricane Hugo--as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of damage. Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. pleaded on national television for aid ranging from baby formula to bulldozers. He said: "We need everything." Electricity was restored at hospitals.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive storm like Hurricane Bonnie represents the Super Bowl and Academy Awards rolled into one for the Weather Channel--the cable network that uses the promotional slogan, "If hell freezes over, you'll hear it here first." The Atlanta-based operation has already charted a ratings spike in response to the storm, with viewing levels rising sharply on Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Recent assessments from rural residences and condominiums have raised damage estimates for South Carolina from Hurricane Hugo to $5.9 billion. The estimate is up from the $4-billion preliminary estimate reached in November by the state Office of Economic Research. The new report listed damage to homes at nearly $3 billion as of Dec. 6, up from only $539 million as of Oct. 27. Hugo killed 29 people in the state.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | Associated Press
Hurricane Hugo victims will get 1,000 Christmas trees and the trimmings to go with them. Organizers said that the trees, relatively expensive in the South because they are shipped from colder climates, might be a luxury beyond the means of many victims of the hurricane that swept through South Carolina in September. Allegan County residents, tree growers and two companies teamed up to send two truckloads of trees to Charleston, S. C.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
Rain soaked the debris-strewn streets of Charleston, but survivors of the coastal city ravaged by Hurricane Hugo banded together to give thanks for life. Morris Street Baptist Church, as in many areas of the city, remained without power 10 days after Hugo's 135-m.p.h. winds hit, but Sunday school and services were held in the natural light from windows. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a South Carolina native, visited the church and met a caravan of trucks with supplies from Washington, D.C.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than half a million people fled the sea shore Tuesday, from Murrells Inlet, S.C., to the Chesapeake Bay as Hurricane Bonnie, a storm almost as large as the South itself, gathered strength and whirled its way toward land. Like a scene from some end-of-the-world movie, cars were bumper-to-bumper on roads leading inland, after officials issued strict evacuation orders for residents of North Carolina's Outer Banks and warned everyone in the region that this is a storm not to be trifled with.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hurricane Fran, blowing with dark fury, roared across Cape Fear late Thursday and sliced into North Carolina like an ax, killing one woman there and another in South Carolina and sending at least half a million people scrambling for safety. Rain blew sideways. Waves taller than houses crashed into shore. Wind hurled rocks through windows and onto rooftops. Both North and South Carolina declared emergencies.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
South Carolina Gov. David Beasley declared a state of emergency, called out the National Guard and ordered half a million people evacuated as powerful Hurricane Fran roared toward an expected collision with the vulnerable Southeastern United States late today or early Friday. "This storm is incredibly dangerous and must be taken seriously as the life-threatening force that it is," Beasley said.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | Associated Press
A tornado spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Beryl smashed through town Tuesday, trapping people for hours in a caved-in shopping center and injuring at least 35. From 40 to 50 buildings were damaged or destroyed, City Administrator L. C. Greene said. "It came by swirling trash, metal, limbs everywhere, then it just stopped and then went on. You could see big old puffs of blue as it went through" knocking out electrical transformers, said Phillip Butler, a grocery store employee. Gov.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Recent assessments from rural residences and condominiums have raised damage estimates for South Carolina from Hurricane Hugo to $5.9 billion. The estimate is up from the $4-billion preliminary estimate reached in November by the state Office of Economic Research. The new report listed damage to homes at nearly $3 billion as of Dec. 6, up from only $539 million as of Oct. 27. Hugo killed 29 people in the state.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | Associated Press
Hurricane Hugo victims will get 1,000 Christmas trees and the trimmings to go with them. Organizers said that the trees, relatively expensive in the South because they are shipped from colder climates, might be a luxury beyond the means of many victims of the hurricane that swept through South Carolina in September. Allegan County residents, tree growers and two companies teamed up to send two truckloads of trees to Charleston, S. C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1989
Mayor Donna L. Chessen has urged city residents to help the people of hurricane-ravaged Charleston, S.C., with donations of money for food, clothing and other items. During Monday's City Council meeting, Chessen made a public plea for donations to help thousands of Charleston residents who were left homeless and hungry in the wake of hurricane Hugo. Hugo has been called the costliest storm ever to hit the United States.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anna Williams is suffering. She has an enlarged heart, high blood pressure and a home wrecked by Hurricane Hugo. A bedroom chest battered by floodwater crumpled when she tried to move it, you can see the ground through the floor, the furnace doesn't work any more, the roof is only temporarily patched, and cold weather is coming. Williams, a soft-spoken 57-year-old widow, surveyed the scene from a worn sofa in her living room.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
When it's all counted up, the damage from Hurricane Hugo may exceed $8 billion, the director of the National Hurricane Center said Thursday. Robert Sheets said the insurance industry is currently estimating its losses at $4 billion. "In the past we have found that total losses get close to two to three times the insurance loss," he told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
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