Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStorms Southeastern United States
IN THE NEWS

Storms Southeastern United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The 1998 Atlantic hurricane season is likely to brew up eight tropical storms, five of which will become hurricanes, a weather forecasting group said. The Houston-based Weather Research Center said there is a 90% chance that the west coast of Florida will be struck by a storm, up from the usual 60% to 70%. Other areas expected to be hit include the east coast of Florida, with a 70% probability, Mexico, 70% and Texas, 60%.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A storm off the southeast coast of the United States gathered just enough strength to become Hurricane Florence, a slow-moving mass of wind and rain already blamed for at least two deaths in North Carolina. Two swimmers died at Kure Beach, N.C., and seven others were rescued from strong rip currents that the Coast Guard blamed on the storm.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | EDITH STANLEY and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The remnants of Tropical Storm Alberto remained a massive black cloud camped over much of Georgia and parts of Alabama and Florida on Wednesday, pounding the region for a third straight day with steady rains that have shut major interstate highways, knocked out power and water systems and led to the deaths of at least 13 people. Drinking water was being trucked into Macon, Ga., a city of 120,000 residents, after the Ocmulgee River rose and swamped a purification plant.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Rain and freezing temperatures spread a coat of ice across parts of Georgia on Sunday, knocking out electrical service to more than half a million customers. Many of those households and businesses could be without power until at least Tuesday as crews struggle over slippery roads to reach downed lines while more are cut by ice-coated tree limbs that continue to snap.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | From United Press International
Thunderstorms and at least one tornado raked the Southeast on Friday as unseasonable heat lingered in the East, but blowing and drifting snow reminded residents of the upper Midwest and Plains that winter has not bowed out yet. Storms in the western Florida Panhandle unleashed up to 6 inches of rain in four hours and flooded a portion of Interstate 10 near Alabama up to car-bumper depth. A tornado uprooted trees northwest of Pensacola, Fla.
NEWS
October 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
Tropical Storm Marco toppled trees and power lines Thursday as it swept along Florida's Gulf Coast. Heavy rain streaming northward from the storm washed out roads and dams in the Carolinas. Nearly 10 inches of rain fell in 24 hours in parts of South Carolina, with unofficial reports of up to 11 inches, the National Weather Service said. The rain was blamed for as many as five deaths in the Carolinas, officials said. Marco pelted Florida's central and southwest coast with winds up to 65 m.p.h.
NEWS
July 4, 1988
Showers brought some relief from the drought in parts of the Southeast and plains states, and strong storms were reported in parts of Texas. Showers and thunderstorms were reported in northwestern North Dakota and from southwestern Oklahoma across northwestern Texas. A tornado touched down briefly near Rising Star, Tex., and thunderstorm winds gusted to 67 m.p.h. at Alice, Tex. There were no reports of serious damage or injuries. Nearly 1 inch of rain fell at Anniston, Ala.
NEWS
July 5, 1988
Storms soaked eastern Texas and Georgia, lightning blacked out the Colorado mountain city of Craig, and temperatures soared in Michigan. Rain showers and occasional thunderstorms reached from western South Carolina and Georgia across eastern Texas and southeast Oklahoma. Showers and thunderstorms also developed in the Dakotas, southern Montana, northern Wyoming and northwest Colorado, as well as northwest New Mexico. Thunderstorms produced 2 inches of rain between North Houston and Humble, Tex.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | From Associated Press
More than 500,000 customers from Arkansas to Delaware were still waiting Monday for utility crews to repair power lines broken by a winter storm, and residents of hard-hit areas of Arkansas may have to go without electricity for 2 1/2 weeks, utility officials said. In Tennessee, where about 129,000 households and businesses still lacked electricity four days after the storm coated trees and power lines with several inches of ice, a shelter was opened in Nashville for residents without power.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Hurricane Felix chased tens of thousands of vacationers and residents from the barrier islands of the eastern United States on Tuesday--and as Bermuda mopped up after a close call--forecasters warned that the 1995 storm season, predicted to be one of the fiercest in 20 years, has barely begun. "We're just starting the peak period of activity, and already we've had seven named storms," said Bob Burpee, director of the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The 1999 hurricane season was in full swing Tuesday, with three tropical storms close to hurricane strength swirling in the Atlantic region. Tropical storm Emily joined Dennis and Cindy, taking forecasters by surprise with her strength. "I don't understand what's happening out there, but things are popping," said Jerry Jarrell, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
NEWS
August 22, 1998 | From Associated Press
Tropical Storm Bonnie is strengthening in the Caribbean and could come ashore in the United States by Monday as the season's first hurricane, forecasters said Friday. At the same time, Tropical Storm Charley in the Gulf of Mexico threatened parts of Texas. "Definitely, it's getting stronger," Jerry Jarrell, director of the National Hurricane Center, said of Bonnie. "People along the Southeastern U.S. should pay attention to its progress."
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The 1998 Atlantic hurricane season is likely to brew up eight tropical storms, five of which will become hurricanes, a weather forecasting group said. The Houston-based Weather Research Center said there is a 90% chance that the west coast of Florida will be struck by a storm, up from the usual 60% to 70%. Other areas expected to be hit include the east coast of Florida, with a 70% probability, Mexico, 70% and Texas, 60%.
NEWS
August 24, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two hurricanes and a tropical storm formed in the Atlantic in 12 hours' time Wednesday, making 1995 one of the most active hurricane seasons on record. Tropical storm systems were lined up like ducks from the mid-Atlantic to the Florida peninsula. The number of named storms this season climbed to 10, with the most active part of the June-through-November period just beginning. Never before have there been so many storms this early in the season; the old record was nine storms by Aug. 22 in 1936.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Hurricane Felix chased tens of thousands of vacationers and residents from the barrier islands of the eastern United States on Tuesday--and as Bermuda mopped up after a close call--forecasters warned that the 1995 storm season, predicted to be one of the fiercest in 20 years, has barely begun. "We're just starting the peak period of activity, and already we've had seven named storms," said Bob Burpee, director of the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
November 19, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Gordon, the Atlantic's "most bizarre storm" in 22 years, battered North Carolina's Outer Banks before it weakened into a tropical storm Friday and doubled back unexpectedly toward Florida. Forecasters in Florida kept a wary eye on Gordon, which left a trail of devastation as it took a zigzag course up from the Caribbean earlier this week. The storm--which didn't reach the 74-m.p.h.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
A storm that had crossed the nation moved into the mid-Atlantic states Friday, giving Virginia its first substantial snow in four years and shutting down that state's government. Snow was scattered from Iowa across the Ohio Valley to Virginia. Rain, snow and sleet fell in parts of the Carolinas, Tennessee and northern Georgia. "Oh Lordy, it's just icy all over up here," said Georgia State Patrol operator A. Thompson from Toccoa.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After pounding South Florida with three days of wind-whipped rain, Tropical Storm Gordon sped across the state's midsection Wednesday, re-emerged in the Atlantic Ocean and headed north for the Carolinas. Forecasters insisted that Gordon, with top winds of about 45 m.p.h., has little chance to become a full-blown hurricane and is likely to merge with a low-pressure system off the coast of Georgia.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | EDITH STANLEY and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The remnants of Tropical Storm Alberto remained a massive black cloud camped over much of Georgia and parts of Alabama and Florida on Wednesday, pounding the region for a third straight day with steady rains that have shut major interstate highways, knocked out power and water systems and led to the deaths of at least 13 people. Drinking water was being trucked into Macon, Ga., a city of 120,000 residents, after the Ocmulgee River rose and swamped a purification plant.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|