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Storms Southern California

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing rain boots and a vinyl work apron, Gordon Jackson sloshed through muddy puddles of water and overturned furniture, trying to save what was left of value in his living room. "We weren't expecting such a severe storm," Jackson said, standing near a water-soaked sofa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rare August rain Tuesday gave Southern Californians a reprieve from the dog days of summer, along with flash flooding, power outages and snarled traffic. In Twentynine Palms, waves of water shoved vehicles off roads and washed mud into nearby homes. Six people in the Yucca Valley area were rescued from vehicles mired in the flooding, according to the San Bernardino County Fire Department. No one was injured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER and JOHN L. MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An intense winter downpour-- the third major storm to hit the region in two weeks--brought heavy snowfalls to local mountains and left Malibu residents once again digging out of mud and debris that surged down rain-soaked hillsides. The powerful cloudbursts Sunday trapped some beachfront residents in their homes and cars, forced a brief closing of Interstate 5 at the Grapevine and set loose mudslides that shut down a portion of Pacific Coast Highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1997
The threat of El Nino storms has underscored the need to protect hillsides from erosion and appropriate planting is the best way to prevent mudslides, experts say. Although deep rooting trees and large shrubs are ideal for holding hillsides together, the fall is too late in the year for those varieties to take hold. September and early October are the time to plant fast-growing grasses and native chaparral for at least some anchoring effect before the start of winter rains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An intense, blustery storm drenched Southern California for a second straight day Friday, contributing to at least four traffic deaths, fraying the nerves of vulnerable hillside residents and delivering a touch of winter to springtime Los Angeles. Downtown, a record 2.45 inches of rain fell between midnight and 3 p.m., breaking the previous record for the date of 1.53 inches, set in 1906.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of unrelenting dryness, the biggest storm in years slashed Southern California on Thursday with heavy downpours and a rare tornado that touched down in Irvine, damaging about 50 condominiums and several mobile homes, but causing no injuries. The rainfall at the Los Angeles Civic Center totaled 2.44 inches in the 24-hour period that ended at 4:30 p.m. Thursday. The last major storm was on Feb. 14, 1986, when 2.5 inches of rain fell in a 24-hour period, according to WeatherData Inc.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ and MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Some took to the mountains, braving the miserable prospect of wrestling with tire chains. Others headed to the beach for a chance to surf waves reaching eight feet in Santa Monica Bay, despite warnings of high bacteria levels from storm-drain runoff. And then there were all those motorists on Saturday, banging into each other on the freeways, creating traffic nightmares throughout the Los Angeles Basin.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Chill, dry Santa Ana winds howled down Southern California's mountain passes and canyons at up to 100 m.p.h. Monday, toppling trucks, shredding Christmas decorations and kicking up dust storms that triggered traffic accidents and forced the temporary closure of three freeways. In addition, power was knocked out to thousands of residential and business customers in widely scattered areas, and arcing power lines, downed by the hurricane-force gusts, ignited several small brush fires.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The driving conditions were horrid--perfect for trying out William Harris' new four-wheel-drive truck. But what began as a test spin on muddy roads turned into a nightmarish encounter with a raging, rain-swollen creek that claimed the life of an 11-year-old Mission Viejo boy who had come along for the ride. Cary Dean Burlew, a fifth-grader at Fred Newhart Elementary School, fell into the churning current and drowned while trying to cross Trabuco Creek tethered to a rope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1996 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jagged red scar running down Guy Arnone's stomach is as jagged as a lightning bolt. With good reason. He's the guy who was jolted by one last week. Rapidly recovering from the blow that knocked him unconscious in his office parking lot in Calabasas, Arnone said he remembers nothing of the freak incident that shredded his clothes and singed his body. "I must have asked the nurses and doctors 20 times, 'What happened? What am I doing here?"
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