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Storms Ventura County

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NEWS
February 13, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the first in a series of showers rolled into Ventura County, repair teams finally mended a storm-ravaged Thousand Oaks sewer main Thursday--but the flow of raw sewage into a hillside creek will not stop before the line is reopened late today. By then, an estimated 63 million gallons of sewage will have spilled into the Arroyo Conejo and headed to the Pacific Ocean, 15 miles downstream.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 2009 | Ronald D. White
On the vast tarmac that marks the Port of Hueneme, a couple of dozen Volvos sit waiting to be trucked to a dealership. There are no bananas coming in this day, no construction equipment, no cars. Business at the 130-acre port is way down since the boom times ended. Hueneme lost $1.3 million during the fiscal year that ended June 30, down from a profit of $1 million in 2008. It has been even harder hit than its massive siblings, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, where profits dropped 40% during the fiscal year and container traffic was down 21%. Unlike those larger operations, which serve thousands of cargo ships each year and process millions of containers filled with myriad products, Hueneme is a niche port, relying mostly on automobile and produce imports for its business.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1998 | CATHY MURILLO and TROY HEIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 40 homes and the Saticoy County Club were without heat and hot water after a high-pressure natural gas line snapped under a landslide near Saticoy on Sunday morning. The 8:55 a.m. rupture, which sent dirt and debris hundreds of feet into the air for nearly an hour, was Ventura County's third gas-main break caused by a landslide in the past three weeks. "It is inconvenient for our customers, and it's costly for us," said Vic Sterling, Southern California Gas Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2001
A freak hailstorm Thursday dumped an inch of miniature ice balls along U.S. 101 at the Santa Barbara County line, setting off a string of car accidents during the morning commute. Twenty cars were damaged as startled motorists hit the brakes and skidded, said California Highway Patrol Sgt. Doug Howell. Maragda Santillana, 19, a volleyball player from Barcelona, Spain, was injured and in fair condition at a local hospital. The hail was isolated to a quarter-mile patch of the freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1993 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unseasonable storm swept down from the Gulf of Alaska early Saturday, dropping just enough rain across Ventura County to put a damper on some outdoor activities and cause a few fender-benders. The heaviest rainfall was reported in the Santa Clara Valley, which received about three-quarters of an inch in some areas, according to the National Weather Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
Forecasters are predicting up to an inch of rain in Ventura County's coastal areas by Friday from the first winter-like storm to strike the area in nearly a month. The cold front, expected to arrive by this morning, will probably be followed by a weaker disturbance Sunday before spring-like weather returns, said Dean Jones, a meteorologist with WeatherData Inc., which forecasts for The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1993 | JEFF McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two people were killed and at least three others were injured as dozens of traffic accidents kept emergency crews scrambling under heavy rains Thursday, a California Highway Patrol official said. "We have so many accidents right now that we're having a hard time keeping track of them," a CHP dispatcher said Thursday evening. Rain-slicked highways and poor visibility contributed to a fatal collision on California 126 west of Fillmore about 6:15 p.m. Thursday that claimed two lives, the CHP said.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As another storm approached Wednesday, Gov. Pete Wilson declared Ventura County a disaster area, and officials estimated weather damage at $8.5 million and rising--with farmers taking the hardest hit. The governor's declaration of a state of emergency in Ventura and nine other waterlogged counties in Northern California allows local officials to recover 75% of the costs of emergency operations. There were no immediate estimates of those costs.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ashamed to seek help from the government, Eliodoro Frutos had never been to an unemployment office before last week. But the farm laborer, out of work indefinitely because of the recent storms, swallowed his pride out of concern for his wife and five children who live in Mexico. Frutos, who has a permit to work in the United States, said his family members rely on the money he sends them to survive. "I haven't been able to send them any money," Frutos said. "They don't have anything."
NEWS
February 28, 1993
A fast-moving hail storm dumped up to five inches of ice on the Conejo Grade in Thousand Oaks on Saturday, creating snow-like conditions and forcing authorities to shut down the Ventura Freeway in both directions. The accumulation created slippery conditions that led to several minor accidents on the freeway, the California Highway Patrol said. CHP officials closed the freeway between Camarillo Springs Road and Wendy Drive at 4:35 p.m.
FOOD
February 21, 2001 | DAVID KARP
The makeup of a farmers market is largely determined by the intent of its sponsor. City managers seeking to draw crowds and entrepreneurs looking to make a profit often fill markets with craft and food vendors. In contrast, the Ventura Midtown venue is operated by Ventura County Certified Farmers Market Assn. by and for farmers, and all but a few of its stands sell locally grown produce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A weak Pacific front that dropped about half an inch of rain on Ventura County early Saturday didn't dampen the spirits of participants in a community run that raised money for heart disease research and education. The fast-moving storm soaked the county between 2 and 8 a.m., tapering off just as hundreds of runners pulled on knit caps, laced up sneakers and hit the pavement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1999 | ANNA GORMAN and JENNIFER HAMM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A winter storm that passed through the region Monday slowed traffic by dropping more than a foot of snow in the mountains of Ventura County but made for some ideal surfing conditions. An inch of rain fell in western Ventura County, while Simi Valley and Thousand Oaks had more than half an inch during the weekend storm that brought precipitation off and on for more than a day. Seasonal rain levels, however, remain far below average.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998 | CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials grappling with the aftermath of an 86-million-gallon sewage spill are investigating a new report of contamination in Conejo Valley creeks. The report came from Westlake Village environmental attorney Edward Masry, who contends that high bacteria counts are the result of leaking municipal sewer lines. But state water quality officials say they believe that runoff--particularly from stables--is the culprit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1998 | CATHY MURILLO and TROY HEIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 40 homes and the Saticoy County Club were without heat and hot water after a high-pressure natural gas line snapped under a landslide near Saticoy on Sunday morning. The 8:55 a.m. rupture, which sent dirt and debris hundreds of feet into the air for nearly an hour, was Ventura County's third gas-main break caused by a landslide in the past three weeks. "It is inconvenient for our customers, and it's costly for us," said Vic Sterling, Southern California Gas Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998
"Furniture, clothes, shoes, televisions, my VCR--we lost everything . . . They wouldn't let us get anything out; they said it was too dangerous. You work for a couple of years and now we don't have nothing. It's all gone." --Ramiro Ortega, whose Ventura apartment was flattened with a thunderous roar Monday night * "The whole creek has just blown over the yard."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS
Forecasters predicted another storm will sweep across Ventura County late today or early Sunday, bringing widely scattered showers that will drop up to an inch of rain in the mountains. Today's storm, however, is expected to be far lighter than Thursday's downpour, which contributed to a head-on collision on California 126 west of Fillmore that claimed two lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2001
A freak hailstorm Thursday dumped an inch of miniature ice balls along U.S. 101 at the Santa Barbara County line, setting off a string of car accidents during the morning commute. Twenty cars were damaged as startled motorists hit the brakes and skidded, said California Highway Patrol Sgt. Doug Howell. Maragda Santillana, 19, a volleyball player from Barcelona, Spain, was injured and in fair condition at a local hospital. The hail was isolated to a quarter-mile patch of the freeway.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the first in a series of showers rolled into Ventura County, repair teams finally mended a storm-ravaged Thousand Oaks sewer main Thursday--but the flow of raw sewage into a hillside creek will not stop before the line is reopened late today. By then, an estimated 63 million gallons of sewage will have spilled into the Arroyo Conejo and headed to the Pacific Ocean, 15 miles downstream.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As another storm approached Wednesday, Gov. Pete Wilson declared Ventura County a disaster area, and officials estimated weather damage at $8.5 million and rising--with farmers taking the hardest hit. The governor's declaration of a state of emergency in Ventura and nine other waterlogged counties in Northern California allows local officials to recover 75% of the costs of emergency operations. There were no immediate estimates of those costs.
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