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NEWS
September 21, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
President Bush ordered more than 1,000 military police, federal marshals and FBI agents to St. Croix on Wednesday as the Coast Guard began evacuating residents and tourists terrorized by violence on the streets and looting in stores and homes shattered by Hurricane Hugo. In a wave of lawlessness that spread across the island, eyewitnesses reported looting by men and women, children and the elderly, even police and National Guardsmen. Armed gangs were reported roaming the streets.
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NEWS
November 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Lenny battered St. Croix with its 150-mph winds Wednesday, damaging homes and hurling boats onto shore. The monster storm then roared toward a string of Dutch and British islands. Just 5 mph shy of a Category 5, the strongest hurricane rating, the storm's powerful winds killed at least four people, from South America to the northeastern Caribbean. St. Croix in the U.S.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The two dominant home and automobile insurers in the Carolinas said Tuesday that they expect to be hit with about $600 million in claims from Hurricane Hugo. Such heavy losses suggest that the storm will be the most expensive ever for the insurance industry. State Farm Insurance Co. expects claims as high as $400 million in South Carolina, where it insures one out of every five homes, spokesman Jerry Parsons said. The Bloomington, Ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying bottles of fresh water, flashlights, granola bars and the clothes they can fit in their bags, nine Orange County American Red Cross volunteers will land in the U.S. Virgin Islands today to aid victims of Hurricane Marilyn. The volunteers--including nurses, counselors, a minister, and disaster assessment specialists--all responded to an emergency call by the Red Cross.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Lenny battered St. Croix with its 150-mph winds Wednesday, damaging homes and hurling boats onto shore. The monster storm then roared toward a string of Dutch and British islands. Just 5 mph shy of a Category 5, the strongest hurricane rating, the storm's powerful winds killed at least four people, from South America to the northeastern Caribbean. St. Croix in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying bottles of fresh water, flashlights, granola bars and the clothes they can fit in their bags, nine Orange County American Red Cross volunteers will land in the U.S. Virgin Islands today to aid victims of Hurricane Marilyn. The volunteers--including nurses, counselors, a minister, and disaster assessment specialists--all responded to an emergency call by the Red Cross.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | From United Press International
Gasoline prices zoomed more than 2 cents a gallon Thursday on the New York Mercantile Exchange after Amerada Hess Corp. said Hurricane Hugo will shut down its 23-million-gallon-a-day Caribbean refinery for two months. It brought the combined two-day Merc gain to more than 4 cents a gallon since the company began buying gasoline on the market Wednesday morning to replace gasoline production from its St. Croix refinery in the Virgin Islands.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Police Capt. Jerry Swan, standing on the docks of Gallows Bay on the formerly beautiful island of St. Croix, gazed toward Recovery Hill, once lush and green, now browned by Hurricane Hugo, dotted with homes missing walls and roofs. "See that house up there?" he said, pointing to a huge, once-opulent structure on the summit. "Now it's on the same level as that guy's down there," pointing to a far more modest home down the slope. Both had suffered extensive damage, both were uninhabitable.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Tom Newberry may be a candidate for the unluckiest man in America. The plane he was aboard Wednesday night on the way to his wedding--USAir Flight 5050--crashed on takeoff at New York's La Guardia Airport. His wedding was scheduled for Saturday in Wilmington, N.C., which is in the path of Hurricane Hugo. Newberry's honeymoon was to have been in the Virgin Islands, which were devastated earlier this week by the hurricane and subsequently by looting and rioting. His plans now?
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Officials in Washington painted a grim portrait Wednesday of the chaos in the U.S. Virgin Islands that led President Bush to authorize the use of federal troops, FBI agents and U.S. marshals to restore order. While Hurricane Hugo's destruction of communications links left details of the disorders unclear, one Interior Department official reported that every store on St. Croix appeared to have been looted.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a tropical storm season that just won't quit, the U.S. Virgin Islands took a pounding Friday from Hurricane Marilyn, a marauder that grew in strength after ripping through the already-battered Leeward Islands with winds of 100 m.p.h. or higher. Hurricane warnings were also flying over Puerto Rico but for the second time in 10 days the populous U.S. commonwealth, home to 3.6 million residents, appeared likely to escape a storm's full fury.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Two weeks after the fury of Hurricane Hugo, only six out of 10 residents have power, the county's 70 schools remain closed and more than 20,000 people still are homeless. But city fathers, who had stressed the city's needs in appeals for aid and in criticism of federal relief efforts, on Wednesday sought to project an upbeat attitude and professed optimism about a full recovery. "This gallant city has withstood the century's greatest storm. The bells of St.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Police Capt. Jerry Swan, standing on the docks of Gallows Bay on the formerly beautiful island of St. Croix, gazed toward Recovery Hill, once lush and green, now browned by Hurricane Hugo, dotted with homes missing walls and roofs. "See that house up there?" he said, pointing to a huge, once-opulent structure on the summit. "Now it's on the same level as that guy's down there," pointing to a far more modest home down the slope. Both had suffered extensive damage, both were uninhabitable.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The two dominant home and automobile insurers in the Carolinas said Tuesday that they expect to be hit with about $600 million in claims from Hurricane Hugo. Such heavy losses suggest that the storm will be the most expensive ever for the insurance industry. State Farm Insurance Co. expects claims as high as $400 million in South Carolina, where it insures one out of every five homes, spokesman Jerry Parsons said. The Bloomington, Ill.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | From United Press International
Gasoline prices zoomed more than 2 cents a gallon Thursday on the New York Mercantile Exchange after Amerada Hess Corp. said Hurricane Hugo will shut down its 23-million-gallon-a-day Caribbean refinery for two months. It brought the combined two-day Merc gain to more than 4 cents a gallon since the company began buying gasoline on the market Wednesday morning to replace gasoline production from its St. Croix refinery in the Virgin Islands.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Tom Newberry may be a candidate for the unluckiest man in America. The plane he was aboard Wednesday night on the way to his wedding--USAir Flight 5050--crashed on takeoff at New York's La Guardia Airport. His wedding was scheduled for Saturday in Wilmington, N.C., which is in the path of Hurricane Hugo. Newberry's honeymoon was to have been in the Virgin Islands, which were devastated earlier this week by the hurricane and subsequently by looting and rioting. His plans now?
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | BOB SECTER and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
American troops, outfitted in riot gear, armed with rifles and ordered to shoot to protect their own lives and the lives of others, arrived by the planeload Thursday on the storm-battered island of St. Croix--and its orgy of looting and shooting seemed to subside. The troops secured the airfield at Christiansted, set up an encampment at a race track across the street and organized a command structure.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a tropical storm season that just won't quit, the U.S. Virgin Islands took a pounding Friday from Hurricane Marilyn, a marauder that grew in strength after ripping through the already-battered Leeward Islands with winds of 100 m.p.h. or higher. Hurricane warnings were also flying over Puerto Rico but for the second time in 10 days the populous U.S. commonwealth, home to 3.6 million residents, appeared likely to escape a storm's full fury.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | BOB SECTER and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
American troops, outfitted in riot gear, armed with rifles and ordered to shoot to protect their own lives and the lives of others, arrived by the planeload Thursday on the storm-battered island of St. Croix--and its orgy of looting and shooting seemed to subside. The troops secured the airfield at Christiansted, set up an encampment at a race track across the street and organized a command structure.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Officials in Washington painted a grim portrait Wednesday of the chaos in the U.S. Virgin Islands that led President Bush to authorize the use of federal troops, FBI agents and U.S. marshals to restore order. While Hurricane Hugo's destruction of communications links left details of the disorders unclear, one Interior Department official reported that every store on St. Croix appeared to have been looted.
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