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Storms Western United States

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NEWS
January 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Blizzard conditions on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains closed highways and closed schools and government offices in Cheyenne, Wyo., which got 10 inches of snow. In Denver, schools and offices closed about noon as drifting snow snarled traffic. Salt Lake City and ski resorts in Utah also got fresh snow. Interstate 25 from southeastern Wyoming to Denver was closed at 11 a.m. but reopened later, the Wyoming Transportation Department said.
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NEWS
January 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Blizzard conditions on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains closed highways and closed schools and government offices in Cheyenne, Wyo., which got 10 inches of snow. In Denver, schools and offices closed about noon as drifting snow snarled traffic. Salt Lake City and ski resorts in Utah also got fresh snow. Interstate 25 from southeastern Wyoming to Denver was closed at 11 a.m. but reopened later, the Wyoming Transportation Department said.
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NEWS
April 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
A powerful storm dropped up to 30 inches inches of snow Thursday on the mountains of the West, creating blizzard conditions that closed schools and snarled traffic. Heavy snow blew across Colorado, Wyoming and Montana, and rain, snow and lightning drove eastward into Nebraska and the Dakotas. Kansas had winds gusting to 82 m.p.h. during the night, National Weather Service officials reported. Snow also fell over eastern Idaho, northern Utah and northwestern Nevada.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wintry weather returned to the Rockies and the northern Great Plains as a fierce storm roared in with snow, freezing rain and high winds. A foot of snow piled up in the western mountains of Wyoming and Montana, and a total accumulation of 18 inches was likely, the National Weather Service said. Schools closed in the Nebraska Panhandle, in some cases after electricity was knocked out by ice and high wind. The weather also caused delays at Denver's Stapleton International Airport.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wintry weather returned to the Rockies and the northern Great Plains as a fierce storm roared in with snow, freezing rain and high winds. A foot of snow piled up in the western mountains of Wyoming and Montana, and a total accumulation of 18 inches was likely, the National Weather Service said. Schools closed in the Nebraska Panhandle, in some cases after electricity was knocked out by ice and high wind. The weather also caused delays at Denver's Stapleton International Airport.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From United Press International
Thunderstorms whipped wind and torrential rain through parts of the South on Friday, demolishing part of an airport in weather-beaten Louisiana, while a mid-spring snowstorm blanketed parts of the Dakotas and the West. The skies opened up Friday and drenched parts of Louisiana and neighboring Texas. The National Weather Service reported that Shreveport, La., recorded more than 3 1/2 inches of rain in six hours, while San Antonio got more than two inches during the same period.
NEWS
January 19, 1988
A storm dumped up to 2 feet of snow in the mountains of the West, with drifts up to 4 feet reported in southern Utah. Duck Creek, Utah, reported 26 inches of snow, and Monticello, Utah, got 24 inches. Durango, Colo, got 18.8 and Flagstaff, Ariz., got 17. Snow kept students from reaching class in some rural areas outside Flagstaff and in parts of southwestern Colorado and central Utah. Schools closed at Durango for the first time in 20 years because of snow.
NEWS
November 25, 1988
Heavy snow driven by brisk winds blanketed much of the West and Rockies, but the eastern two-thirds of the nation basked in Thanksgiving Day sunshine. Twenty-two inches of new snow piled up in West Yellowstone, Mont., while, in Utah, the Alta ski resort received 15 inches, Park City had 12 and Salt Lake City got two. Scattered power outages were reported. Temperatures plummeted as the storm moved through Colorado, whipped by 40 m.p.h. winds that occasionally gusted to 60 m.p.h.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | From Associated Press
A powerful storm brought wind-whipped snow up to two feet deep to parts of the West on Tuesday. Travelers on highways from Wyoming to Arizona were stranded and many schools were closed. Las Vegas received its second snowfall of the winter, a rarity in the southern Nevada desert, and parts of Wyoming had their first major snow of the season.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | From Associated Press
A powerful storm spread snow from Arizona to the Dakotas on Thursday, after dumping up to five feet of snow in the mountains of the Southwest. Thirty avalanches were reported in the Colorado mountains as the storm slowly moved eastward. Colorado Springs, Colo., received 14 inches of snow. The city's airport, major newspaper and most public schools were closed. Outlying areas received as much as 20 inches of snow, which fell at a rate of an inch an hour all day. Winds gusting to more than 30 m.p.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From United Press International
Thunderstorms whipped wind and torrential rain through parts of the South on Friday, demolishing part of an airport in weather-beaten Louisiana, while a mid-spring snowstorm blanketed parts of the Dakotas and the West. The skies opened up Friday and drenched parts of Louisiana and neighboring Texas. The National Weather Service reported that Shreveport, La., recorded more than 3 1/2 inches of rain in six hours, while San Antonio got more than two inches during the same period.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
A powerful storm dropped up to 30 inches inches of snow Thursday on the mountains of the West, creating blizzard conditions that closed schools and snarled traffic. Heavy snow blew across Colorado, Wyoming and Montana, and rain, snow and lightning drove eastward into Nebraska and the Dakotas. Kansas had winds gusting to 82 m.p.h. during the night, National Weather Service officials reported. Snow also fell over eastern Idaho, northern Utah and northwestern Nevada.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Tornadoes moved across Texas, Arkansas and Missouri on Wednesday in a renewed assault of thunderstorms while crews continued to clear the wreckage of more than 100 homes damaged by twisters that ripped through six states. Two twisters in central Texas overturned mobile homes, tore off roofs and toppled utility poles Wednesday, and winds in excess of 50 m.p.h. blew over trailers and highway signs and downed power lines across northern parts of the state. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
January 12, 1989
Strong winds whipped through the mountains of the Southwest while snow fell in the Colorado Rockies and the northern plains, fog socked in parts of the Mississippi Valley and thunderstorms hit the Gulf Coast. The National Weather Service said 10 inches of snow fell at the Powderhorn ski area in Colorado, while 7 inches was reported near Pueblo. Gusts of up to 61 m.p.h. were clocked in the Guadalupe Pass of West Texas.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | From United Press International
A storm dumped up to 17 inches of snow over the Rocky Mountains on Friday, and the wintry weather headed for the Great Plains. Austin, Nev., was hit with 12 inches of snow during the night, and Bob Scott Summit received a 17-inch cover, the National Weather Service reported. Strong winds combined with the snow to reduce visibility over the state and left 2-foot snow drifts near Austin, weather officials said.
NEWS
January 19, 1988
A storm dumped up to 2 feet of snow in the mountains of the West, with drifts up to 4 feet reported in southern Utah. Duck Creek, Utah, reported 26 inches of snow, and Monticello, Utah, got 24 inches. Durango, Colo, got 18.8 and Flagstaff, Ariz., got 17. Snow kept students from reaching class in some rural areas outside Flagstaff and in parts of southwestern Colorado and central Utah. Schools closed at Durango for the first time in 20 years because of snow.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | From United Press International
A storm dumped up to 17 inches of snow over the Rocky Mountains on Friday, and the wintry weather headed for the Great Plains. Austin, Nev., was hit with 12 inches of snow during the night, and Bob Scott Summit received a 17-inch cover, the National Weather Service reported. Strong winds combined with the snow to reduce visibility over the state and left 2-foot snow drifts near Austin, weather officials said.
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