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Storms Wyoming

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NEWS
July 4, 1993 | Associated Press
Meteorologists had a snowball's chance in July of predicting the weather that hit northern Wyoming on Saturday. Most Wyoming residents began the holiday weekend with sunny skies and warm weather, but people in northern Wyoming scrambled for their snowsuits. One foot of new snow was reported in parts of Grand Teton National Park. The National Weather Service had predicted thunderstorms across northern Wyoming for Saturday. But heavy rains combined with a cold front to produce snow.
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NEWS
February 26, 1998 | Reuters
El Nino came here on Wednesday, dumping up to 26 inches of snow on the foothills, closing schools, tying up highways and shutting down the airport. Heavy storms also hit Wyoming, where Interstate 80, the main east-west route through the state, was closed from Laramie to Cheyenne. Salt Lake City International Airport was closed for more than six hours, its longest stretch in 28 years.
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NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Volunteers from as far as 50 miles away passed sandbags hand to hand during a steady rain Saturday, trying to protect this town's sole source of clean water from a rising flood. The southwestern Minnesota town sits where the Chippewa and Minnesota rivers merge, normally forming a stream about 100 yards across. On Saturday, the water stretched out to about a mile wide, flooding two of the three main highways into town. More than 100 families had been evacuated.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Volunteers from as far as 50 miles away passed sandbags hand to hand during a steady rain Saturday, trying to protect this town's sole source of clean water from a rising flood. The southwestern Minnesota town sits where the Chippewa and Minnesota rivers merge, normally forming a stream about 100 yards across. On Saturday, the water stretched out to about a mile wide, flooding two of the three main highways into town. More than 100 families had been evacuated.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A blizzard that brought up to 2 feet of snow shut down miles of highways in Wyoming and South Dakota as a strong storm system slid onto the western Plains. The heaviest snowfall was in western South Dakota, where nearly 24 inches fell at Lead and Deadwood in the rugged Black Hills, with wind blowing at 40 mph. Heavy snow also fell in northeastern Wyoming, with 19 inches at Ranchester, near the Montana state line, and 12 inches at Lander and Sheridan.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
A spring snowstorm swept across the Rockies, dumping up to eight inches of heavy, wet snow in Montana, while winds and new snow created near blizzard conditions in parts of Wyoming. Heavy snow warnings were posted through today over the northern mountains of Wyoming, with up to a foot of snowfall expected by late today in the Laramie Range. Near Cheyenne, Wyo., about six inches of new snow combined with strong and gusty winds to create near blizzard conditions. In south-central Montana, eight inches of snow fell on Red Lodge, a ski resort community.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All winter long, the monster snow sat, 109 inches of it, the most in memory, congealing in backyards like enormous albino hedgerows and sprouting like whalish toadstools in shopping mall parking lots. Trudging inside 8-foot-high tunnels carved out of sidewalk slush, desperate Dakotans wondered if the worst snowfall on record would ever melt away. Now, in the first flush of a Great Plains spring, they worry it is melting too fast.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | Reuters
El Nino came here on Wednesday, dumping up to 26 inches of snow on the foothills, closing schools, tying up highways and shutting down the airport. Heavy storms also hit Wyoming, where Interstate 80, the main east-west route through the state, was closed from Laramie to Cheyenne. Salt Lake City International Airport was closed for more than six hours, its longest stretch in 28 years.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Heavy rain unleashed mudslides that buried a car, temporarily trapped eight others and caused flooding that chased 55 tourists from their rented cabins, park officials said Saturday. The mudslides took place Friday night on a stretch of road below slopes denuded by the huge forest fires that swept the park in the summer of 1988, officials said. The occupants of the car that was buried escaped uninjured, park spokeswoman Joan Anzelmo said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To an upscale Japanese-American family in Claremont, the harassment involved broken eggs, human feces slung on a front porch and a vulgar missive painted on an outside wall. "You Rice Ball," the overnight vandal wrote. To a program director at a well-known Asian-American center in Los Angeles, the hate mail is a regularly arriving nuisance: large envelopes containing slogans such as "Japs Go Home" and crude hand-drawn cartoons of people with yellow faces and devil's horns.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All winter long, the monster snow sat, 109 inches of it, the most in memory, congealing in backyards like enormous albino hedgerows and sprouting like whalish toadstools in shopping mall parking lots. Trudging inside 8-foot-high tunnels carved out of sidewalk slush, desperate Dakotans wondered if the worst snowfall on record would ever melt away. Now, in the first flush of a Great Plains spring, they worry it is melting too fast.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A blizzard that brought up to 2 feet of snow shut down miles of highways in Wyoming and South Dakota as a strong storm system slid onto the western Plains. The heaviest snowfall was in western South Dakota, where nearly 24 inches fell at Lead and Deadwood in the rugged Black Hills, with wind blowing at 40 mph. Heavy snow also fell in northeastern Wyoming, with 19 inches at Ranchester, near the Montana state line, and 12 inches at Lander and Sheridan.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | Associated Press
Meteorologists had a snowball's chance in July of predicting the weather that hit northern Wyoming on Saturday. Most Wyoming residents began the holiday weekend with sunny skies and warm weather, but people in northern Wyoming scrambled for their snowsuits. One foot of new snow was reported in parts of Grand Teton National Park. The National Weather Service had predicted thunderstorms across northern Wyoming for Saturday. But heavy rains combined with a cold front to produce snow.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Heavy rain unleashed mudslides that buried a car, temporarily trapped eight others and caused flooding that chased 55 tourists from their rented cabins, park officials said Saturday. The mudslides took place Friday night on a stretch of road below slopes denuded by the huge forest fires that swept the park in the summer of 1988, officials said. The occupants of the car that was buried escaped uninjured, park spokeswoman Joan Anzelmo said.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
A spring snowstorm swept across the Rockies, dumping up to eight inches of heavy, wet snow in Montana, while winds and new snow created near blizzard conditions in parts of Wyoming. Heavy snow warnings were posted through today over the northern mountains of Wyoming, with up to a foot of snowfall expected by late today in the Laramie Range. Near Cheyenne, Wyo., about six inches of new snow combined with strong and gusty winds to create near blizzard conditions. In south-central Montana, eight inches of snow fell on Red Lodge, a ski resort community.
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