Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStorybook
IN THE NEWS

Storybook

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Debra Prinzing
Frank Beddor bought what had been listed as a “gentleman's hunting lodge” designed by architect Robert Byrd in 1950. Nearly obscured by trees on a 2-acre hillside just a few blocks above Hollywood Boulevard, the rustic structure had a steep-pitched roof and weathered redwood siding. It looked straight out of a storybook and reminded Beddor, bestselling novelist of the young-adult trilogy “The Looking Glass Wars,” of summers spent in the woods of Minnesota. “It's a miniature version of my childhood,” he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
March 29, 2014 | By Carren Jao
Fredda Weiss used to tell people visiting her Mandeville Canyon cottage for the first time to watch for the house "that looks like the seven dwarfs live there. " Weiss' 1950s home was warm and inviting - but also a little dark and dated. So after three decades of living in the 2,283-square-foot cottage, Weiss decided to give her storybook home a happy ending. And she had just the architect in mind: Zoltan Pali. "If I was going to do this house, he was going to be my architect," Weiss says.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 10, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
At 9:12 p.m. Eastern time Wednesday, before a packed Arthur Ashe Stadium crowd looking for another Melanie Miracle in the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Cinderella's slipper came off. The mighty mite of this two-week event, Melanie Oudin, stopped her motion on her second serve as somebody yelled from the upper deck, "Wake up, Melanie." The crowd hushed the creep, Oudin made the serve, soon hit one last backhand wide and walked to the net to shake hands with Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The beauty of a well-told fable is typically in its airy brevity, with a moral sharp and bittersweet. Ramaa Mosley's feature debut, "The Brass Teapot," has Aesopian pretensions with its supernatural-themed story about the titular vessel's darkly magical effect on the lives of a young, financially strapped married couple, played by Juno Temple and Michael Angarano. But the conceit - the teapot fills with money when harm is inflicted in its presence - is treated less like a starting-off point for something wise to say about societal masochism than an opportunity to indulge in weakly cynical jokes and aggressively ouch-y humor.
HOME & GARDEN
October 21, 2004 | Lisa Boone
When her daughter lost her first tooth, Julie Kentera felt uncomfortable playing the role of a cash-doling tooth fairy. "It just felt wrong that the celebration for such a milestone had become -- cash," says Kentera. "Where's ceremony or sentiment in that?" The incident inspired the stay-at-home mother of two to create DreamPearls for Girls, a handcrafted bracelet made of Swarovski crystals and sterling silver.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
TAMPA, Fla. -- As expected, the speech that Ann Romney is to deliver this evening is heavy on appeal to emotion, based on her role as Mitt Romney's wife, the mother of his five sons and the grandmother to his 18 grandchildren. In an excerpt released by the Romney campaign several hours before she was to take the stage around  10 p.m. EDT on the first full day of the Republican National Convention, the aspiring first lady invoked her family, their strong bonds and her husband's generosity of spirit.
SPORTS
July 9, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Rodriguez and Mark Grudzielanek are here as forerunners of an impressive new wave of young shortstops. Barry Larkin and Cal Ripken Jr. are here as the redoubtable, still-productive, always-familiar veteran starters at that position. And Ozzie Smith is here as . . . well, a 19-year highlight film now on the last reel and possibly, no, probably, the best shortstop ever.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | BOB MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Everyone appeared to be primed for the Franklin High School baseball team's City 3-A semifinal game against Huntington Park last Friday. The Panther pitchers, outstanding throughout the season, looked sharp, the hitters were loose and the fielding was tight. But something funny happened on the way to the game at Cal State Los Angeles--the Panthers forgot how to play the brilliant brand of baseball that captured the Northern League title. Everything went wrong.
NEWS
December 18, 1985 | MIV SCHAAF
Several years ago I was telling Mrs. Fontaine, who lived in the bungalow next door, what I had heard about a house up the street, that its original cobblestone chimney had been replaced by a brick one. "Who told you that?" she demanded. "Mr. Wright over on Arbor." She laughed in scorn. "Why he's a newcomer." "He is? I thought he'd lived here a long time." "Heavens no. Only been here 25 years."
NEWS
November 7, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and HARRIET STIX
San Francisco and New York are 3,000 miles, a three-hour time difference and a five-hour plane trip apart. Manhattan is an island, and San Francisco, surrounded by water on three sides, likes to think of itself as island-like and exotic. Both have many tall buildings, bustling financial districts, elegant restaurants, outrageous real-estate prices and famous opera companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Robert Abele
What might ringmaster-of-the-subconscious Fellini have done with the peculiar phenomenon of reality TV? The gifted Italian filmmaker Matteo Garrone (the excellent "Gomorrah") gives us his own magically eccentric homage of sorts to that hypothetical with the psychologically astute, dreamlike gut-punch that is "Reality. " Predicated on the idea that the promise of 15 minutes of fame is as treacherous a mental minefield as instant celebrity's fizzled aftermath, Garrone gives us Napoli fishmonger Luciano (Aniello Arena)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In DreamWorks' new animation adventure "Rise of the Guardians," Santa has tats, he goes by the name North and he sounds like Alec Baldwin. Jack Frost is a renegade kid, a snowboarding/ice skating ace brought to life by Chris Pine, who brings all of his "Star Trek" swagger. The movie's total nightmare of a boogeyman is Pitch, who lurks around in the dark and drips with sinister sarcasm courtesy of Jude Law. It's as if hip-hop has come to Candyland, bringing an urban edginess to the traditional storybook rap. But that's only the tip of the 3-D iceberg.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
TAMPA, Fla. -- As expected, the speech that Ann Romney is to deliver this evening is heavy on appeal to emotion, based on her role as Mitt Romney's wife, the mother of his five sons and the grandmother to his 18 grandchildren. In an excerpt released by the Romney campaign several hours before she was to take the stage around  10 p.m. EDT on the first full day of the Republican National Convention, the aspiring first lady invoked her family, their strong bonds and her husband's generosity of spirit.
SPORTS
August 11, 2012 | By Bill Dwyre
LONDON -- The storybook tale did not have the expected happy ending for the U.S. women's volleyball team Saturday night. Ranked No. 1 -- and coached by Hugh McCutcheon, who had guided the U.S. men to the gold in Beijing over Brazil -- the women got outplayed and lost. Brazil won by a final score of 11-25, 25-17, 25-20, 25-17. It looked as if the U.S. women would run away with the gold-medal match when they dominated the first set and won, 25-11. But that appeared to mostly embarrass Brazil, which came storming back in the second set and won, 25-17.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Debra Prinzing
Frank Beddor bought what had been listed as a “gentleman's hunting lodge” designed by architect Robert Byrd in 1950. Nearly obscured by trees on a 2-acre hillside just a few blocks above Hollywood Boulevard, the rustic structure had a steep-pitched roof and weathered redwood siding. It looked straight out of a storybook and reminded Beddor, bestselling novelist of the young-adult trilogy “The Looking Glass Wars,” of summers spent in the woods of Minnesota. “It's a miniature version of my childhood,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
What gruesome casualty statistics fail to do, a horse made of wire mesh and plywood pulls off with profound simplicity: Joey, the magnificent puppet stallion at the center of"War Horse,"communicates to a broad public the staggering waste of war. Yes, it's sentimental. Yes, there are scenes that might have given even as inveterate a melodramatist as Charles Dickens pause. But this 2011 best play Tony winner, which launched its national tour at the Ahmanson Theatre on Friday, takes the audience on a thrilling roller-coaster ride in which innocence is thrown into a man-made hell.
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
A familiar fairy tale told in small chunks with a gentle contemporary twist or three; a song here, a hoot-and-holler chase there, a dance or two and loads of audience participation: That's Storybook Theatre's unchanging formula at Theatre West in L.A. It's been 20 years since the company -- created by Barbara Mallory Schwartz and her husband, TV and film writer/producer Lloyd J. Schwartz ("The Brady Bunch" movies) -- began producing shows for the preschool and kindergarten set.
SPORTS
November 16, 1996
Instead of spending $50 for the Tyson-Holyfield fight, I rented the film "The Harder They Fall," which is the story of a boxer, who, with the help of a shady promoter, beats up and knocks out stiffs before finally fighting a real fighter and getting knocked out. Does that ring a bell? MARC POPKIN Brentwood No way, Jose. The fix was in. Holyfield has never had a punch and always gets beaten up. Tyson never lets an opponent tie him up and always fights in a rage. Boxing isn't like football, where on a given day any team can beat any other.
SPORTS
June 29, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
The Santa Clarita Blue Heat may be the most interesting women's soccer team you've never heard of. It's a French Foreign Legion in shin guards and rubber cleats, with players from six countries - seven if you count the Pennsylvanian who spent last summer playing in Iceland. And every one of them has a story to tell. "It's funny sometimes, the mix," captain Edite Fernandes, who is also captain of the Portuguese national team, says in Spanish, one of four languages represented on the Blue Heat roster.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
From Pebble Beach -- In the wake of Sunday's Tiger-Phil showdown at the Pebble Beach corral, one prevailing image emerges. It is of Phil Mickelson, standing over a coffin, hammer in hand, pounding down a final nail. Will Tiger Woods ever recover from this one? Can the 64-75 final-round beating that Woods took at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am be shrugged off as just another bad day, another step in the "process" that Tiger keeps talking about? It's one thing to have your brains beaten out, entirely another to have it happen when you are playing head to head, in the second-to-last pairing of a tournament that has a huge following, that is played in one of the most picturesque places in the world.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|