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January 19, 1992
Hats off to Hilary de Vries for "Streisand, the Storyteller" (Dec. 8). Her observations of the '90s Barbra were astute and sensitive. As I see it, Streisand's "perfectionism" comes from the little kid who was abandoned and afraid. Streisand is a phenomenon of her own creation. In 20 years, will she be succeeded by Madonna? IRWIN M. KARASH West Hollywood
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Abele
A determined historical sweep masks a small-minded bid for easy outrage and heartstrings-pulling in the schematic World War II drama "Walking With the Enemy. " Set in 1944, when the war was essentially over for the Nazis but their reign of terror in occupied territories was still going strong, the movie focuses on the efforts of a young, displaced Hungarian Jew named Elek (Jonas Armstrong) to find his family after escaping from a camp, which turned into a concerted effort to save many Hungarian Jews.
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TRAVEL
April 12, 1992
The article by Beverly Beyer and Ed Rabey ("Donegal Weaves a Poetic Spell of Enchantment," March 15) describes a brehon as a storyteller. This was not the case, as the class of brehon did not exist until the 1st Century AD. Prior to this, the functions of judge, along with those of poet and historian, were performed by a single class called file. The file were primarily poets and philosophers with a thorough schooling in the arts. In the 1st Century, the High King of Ireland removed the privilege of (jurisdiction)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By David Colker
When professional storyteller Leslie Perry was in his prime, his performances were electrifying displays of verbal pyrotechnics, with Perry shouting out passages like a hellfire preacher while sometimes dancing back and forth on the stage, his fists pumping in rhythm with the recitation. In more recent years, with his body sapped by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis , also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, Perry sat in a chair while telling his stories. And though his movements had to be far more subtle, the vocal colors he brought to his stories made them no less riveting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By David Colker
When professional storyteller Leslie Perry was in his prime, his performances were electrifying displays of verbal pyrotechnics, with Perry shouting out passages like a hellfire preacher while sometimes dancing back and forth on the stage, his fists pumping in rhythm with the recitation. In more recent years, with his body sapped by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis , also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, Perry sat in a chair while telling his stories. And though his movements had to be far more subtle, the vocal colors he brought to his stories made them no less riveting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
"Fearnot," the second of Jim Henson's intermittent "The Storyteller" shows for NBC, is a visual treat for those with a taste for the weird and wonderful. (It airs tonight at 8:30 on Channels 4, 36 and 39.) John Hurt, enjoyably reprising his role as the reclusive Storyteller, narrates an odd little tale of a fearless young man who seeks to feel fear. Written by Anthony Minghella, directed by Steve Barron, "Fearnot" is based on a German folk tale, a slight story made rich through the telling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Rebecca Solnit's latest book, "The Faraway Nearby" (Viking: 260 pp., $25.95), began with a delivery of 100 pounds of apricots. "It was like a trumpet blew and said, 'You're entering the world of narrative," the 52-year-old author recalls by phone from her home in San Francisco's Mission District, her voice soft as falling petals, her laugh a whisper on the wire. The apricots came from her brother, who had collected them from a tree in their mother's yard. At the time, the older woman was in the throes of Alzheimer's; she had been moved into an assisted care facility, making the fruit a metaphor, an allegory, for everything that she, that the family, had lost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994
An author of children's books and a renowned teller of Beatrix Potter stories will visit Roch Courreges Elementary School today as part of Authorfest 1994. Laura Glusha, author of the children's book "Suck a Toe," and Dolores Bowles, who uses puppets and other visual aids during her readings, will spend the day giving presentations, answering questions and signing books for children.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | Mindy Farabee
There was a time when all you had to do to experience the saga of the Trojan War -- the epic conflict which spawned both "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" -- was to plop down in front of a solitary, possibly blind storyteller. Then someone committed Homer's words to the written page and, more recently, the video screen, removing the story's immediacy. But now two Brits are reclaiming the story's oral tradition. "We discovered, to our eternal surprise, there is a great groundswell of interest for theatrical retellings of 'The Odyssey,' " says actor Daniel Morden, who is reviving one of the oldest performing arts along with storyteller Hugh Lupton.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1988 | JAN GOLAB, Golab is a North Hollywood free-lance writer
It is a scene that most residents of Agoura Hills will never see. After visitors to the Renaissance Pleasure Faire leave the grounds on Saturday and Sunday nights, the villagers--an encampment of nearly 1,000 actors, artisans, assorted minstrels and their attending broods--come out to play. Princes and damsels, knaves and knights, freebooters and merchants, and wizards and gnomes begin to swarm through the hills like goblins on All Hallows Eve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Krysten Ritter and Brian Geraghty, performers who have delivered striking work elsewhere, are hard to read in "Refuge," a torpid drama about a tentative new romance. Or perhaps they're too easy to read; whatever emotional depths filmmaker Jessica Goldberg hopes to suggest, there's nothing stirring beneath the movie's static surface. The central characters' coupledom might bring them a safe haven, but audiences will be left out in the cold. Adapting her stage play, Goldberg uses wintry Southampton, N.Y., locations to convey a down-and-out working-class vibe.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
LOS OSOS, Calif. - He led an active electronic life, so the cyber silence was ominous. No emails. No posts to any of the thousand-plus friends on Facebook. When word finally surfaced, it wasn't from him. "If you have noticed Jim's absence from Facebook, there is a reason. He has been doing poorly for a week or so ... and yesterday they detected a mass in his brain. Having elected to have no extraordinary medical measures, he is at home in Los Osos and we are waiting for hospice to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
The stereotypical Sundance movie is thought of as something capital-Q quirky, typically a story of family dysfunction or coming-of-age. This year's festival, across its numerous sections, featured a newfound immersion in genre storytelling that pushed the films to places that were familiar but with unexpected and most welcome twists. Gareth Evans' "The Raid 2," for instance, does for the blood-soaked Asian action film what "The Dark Knight" did for the superhero film, injecting it with a seriousness, a depth of characterization and a scope of storytelling that raises it to a new level of legitimacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Aristotle placed spectacle near the bottom of his list of tragedy's essentials, and anyone who ventures to see "An Iliad" at the Broad Stage will agree that special effects aren't needed to bring to the stage Homer's deathless epic in all its agonizing, heroic glory. The set is largely bare, save for some scattered props and backstage equipment that never let us forget we are in a theater. The cast consists of one actor, Denis O'Hare. Little did we know from his Tony-winning turn as the gay baseball fanatic in Richard Greenberg's "Take Me Out" that he harbors legions of legendary Greeks, Trojans and immortal deities within himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SAN QUENTIN - The scene was almost indistinguishable from that in any other newsroom. Editors sat around chatting about the next issue and tinkering with stories. Front pages were tacked up on the walls, and family photos were taped to computer terminals. But in fact this newspaper office was unlike almost any other, obvious from the dress code: Staff members wore the standard blue uniform of California prison inmates. When the phone rang, the answer was a crisp, "Hello, San Quentin News.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
In "Sweet Talk," Delilah (Natalie Zea) is an erudite phone-sex worker who besides naming herself after the Biblical escort reads "Anna Karenina" and plays chess during routine calls. One "John" (for they're all named John) gets her attention, though, when he proposes that in lieu of the usual dirty talk, they tell each other tales - seduction by storytelling, a la Scheherazade. And get this: His real name is Samson (Jeffrey Vincent Parise). Scripted by Peter Lefcourt based on his stage play and directed by his wife, Terri Hanauer, the film gradually slips into the sweeping romances they spin for each other by depositing Samson and Delilah in her overalls and oversized sweat shirt in the settings they invent and eventually transporting the couple in full period costume to 1914 Budapest and 1939 Vienna.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | Kate Bernheimer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Storyteller The Authorized Biography of Roald Dahl Donald Sturrock Simon & Schuster: 658 pp., $30 I was sitting on an airplane with a copy of "Storyteller: The Authorized Biography of Roald Dahl" when an elegant woman in the seat next to me murmured, almost to herself, "I live just down the lane from his old cottage in Oxfordshire. " Turning to her with excitement I asked if she'd ever run into him. "Oh, no, no," she said with obvious amusement, as if the very suggestion was completely absurd.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
In his only big-screen film role, Activision Blizzard Inc. Chief Executive Bobby Kotick appeared in "Moneyball" as a penny-pinching owner of the Oakland Athletics baseball team. "I'm asking you to be OK not spending money that I don't have," he tells team manager Billy Beane, played by Brad Pitt. The art-imitates-life moment was vintage Kotick, who has earned a reputation for fiscal restraint among Wall Street investors while playing ball in the big leagues with pals such as DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg and billionaires Eli Broad and Elon Musk.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The youthful, sweater-wearing Kotick is a non-gamer who heads the world's largest video game company and has a knack for identifying hit franchises - among them the "Tony Hawk's Pro Skater" skateboarding games, "Guitar Hero" rock fantasy series, "Call of Duty" military simulations and "Skylanders" toys-come-to-life children's titles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke's "Unknown Pleasures," "The World" and "24 City" have been celebrated by critics and on the international festival circuit, but his work has yet to break through with a wider audience in America. That might change with his latest, "A Touch of Sin," an action film of sorts set in contemporary China and opening Friday in Los Angeles. Where Jia's earlier works have often blended fiction with documentary, here he overlays the style of traditional martial arts adventure storytelling known as wuxia onto his contemporary four-part tale of loners, revenge and violence based on recent real-life incidents in China.
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