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Storytelling

ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1994 | SEAN MONIQUE FAUSTINA, TIME STAFF WRITER
"Tell me a story." Sometimes we just want to let our imagination switch into overdrive and, through the mind's eye, paint a picture with words. Interactive entertainment has acquired new meaning through one of the oldest forms of communication--storytelling, and no batteries are required. "Words, Wisdom and Wit" is the first of a series of live spoken-word concerts for and by adults to be presented tonight at 8 at the Beverly Hills Library.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1995 | TOM RAGAN
More than a dozen children sat wide-eyed Monday night as Barbara Klein, a professional storyteller, fascinated them with a few tales at the Central Library on Avocado Avenue. There was the story about Kipper, a sorrowfully discontented dog who ventured out of his home to find a new place to sleep because he was fed up with his basket--not to mention the crummy old bone and blanket inside it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1997 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To hear Harlynne Geisler tell it, Hansel and Gretel have been sighted around the globe more often than Elvis. Besides inhabiting the standard locale--a forbidding and vaguely Bavarian forest with a bewitched gingerbread house--the tots have turned up everywhere from a Laotian jungle to a drought-stricken South African plain, Geisler says. She should know.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER HEREDIA
The three Rs were put on hold Tuesday at Fred Williams Elementary School in South Oxnard as pupils and teachers kicked off their second annual storytelling festival. Some of the pint-sized narrators were clearly nervous, evidenced by cracking voices or long pauses. Others, however, were polished orators.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | JENNIFER TURNER, Jennifer Turner is a senior at Orange High School, where she is editor of the Reflector, the student newspaper, and secretary on the ASB Cabinet. She also runs track and takes ballet lessons
A classroom full of second-graders sat on the floor in rapt attention. There was no TV set turned on, and the film projector was silent. Instead, the focus of the 30-some children in Maria Peck's class at West Orange Elementary School was on Jim Perez, who did nothing more than tell them a story. Perez, a sophomore at Orange High School, was taking part in the ancient art of storytelling--not just reading, but actually memorizing the tale and then telling it to an audience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the kind of tale that could quiet a group of 80 boisterous schoolchildren: the legend of a white buffalo whose gift of a peace pipe brought harmony between two Crow tribes. And after Martyne Van Hofwegen, a storyteller employed by the Capistrano Unified School District's Indian Education Resource Center, finished weaving her tale of magic, dozens of small hands shot in the air. "Um, is that story, like, true?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The monster was in the bedroom, intent on devouring Grandma while she slept. A deep snort resounded from the room. "Monster!" one child shrieked, while others gasped. The noise, to the youngsters' relief and amusement, turns out to be Grandma's snoring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1992 | HELAINE OLEN
American Indian storyteller Geri Keams will tell tales and relate myths and legends of various Indian tribes when she appears at the Children's Museum at La Habra on Saturday afternoon. In addition to telling such stories as "How We Got the Big Dipper" and "How the Coyote Lost His Fur," Keams will demonstrate tribal chanting and singing. Audience participation will be encouraged. Keams was born and reared on the Navajo reservation in Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Like a lot of young boys in the '50s, Troy Evans grew up wanting to be President. Instead, he flunked out of college, got drafted, spent two years in the Vietnam jungle, came home, got shot, was arrested for "15 to 20" assaults and served almost two years in a Montana prison. Near the end of his term, he reassessed his options. "What can you do (where) nobody's going to ask if you're a felon?" You can act. For 15 years, Evans has built a career doing just that. Along the way, he's also developed an old family tradition: storytelling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1986 | JANET ZIMMERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Wide-eyed and spellbound, 50 students at Orangethorpe School in Fullerton waited Friday to hear whether big bad Golly Wolf would devour the little girl who had wandered into the forest to pick flowers. Sixth-graders and special education students gasped at the description of Golly Wolf's teeth that "were as sharp as razor blades" in the four-minute tale, part of a weekly storytelling hour at the school.
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