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Storytelling

ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000 | JUDY RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing up in the mountains of North Carolina, Donald Davis heard stories--Scottish and Welsh folk tales from Grandma Walker, tall tales from Uncle Frank and lots of mountain lore. Now he uses them all, incorporating his own childhood experiences in touchingly told performances around the country that have earned him the title "Appalachian Everyman."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2004 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
The young audience sat mesmerized as 10-year-old Crystal Gaspar reached under her jaw with both hands and pulled upward, pretending to remove her head and place it on her lap. Grasping an imaginary brush in her right hand, she stroked the hair before returning the head to its proper place.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989 | CORRINE FLOCKEN
Take heart, all ye parents of talkative tots. Given some imagination, self-assurance and a taste for the spotlight, your loquacious lad or lass just might be headed for a career in the ancient art of storytelling. That's how it worked for Alecia Grebner, a 15-year-old high school senior whose knack for narrative earned her the title of the Best Young Professional Storyteller in America last year in the Oakland Storytelling Festival, put on by the National Festival of Black Storytellers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1997 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Antonio Sacre took a lot of hazing from classmates in his Delaware elementary school because he was one of the few Latinos enrolled. So much, that by the time he reached first grade, he made a life-altering decision. "No one spoke Spanish in my school," said Sacre, the son of a Cuban-born father and an Irish American mother. "One day, I just came home and announced that I didn't want to speak Spanish ever again."
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's maddening, that feeling, much like a turn through a family album where most of the photos have worked themselves free from the page. What remains? Vacant snapshot-sized windows where the photo once lay. A dogeared confusion bereft of chronology. A sepia wash: Moments so drained of detail, the remnants of image hover like ghosts. These, too, are the tricks of fickle memory.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everybody loves a good story. Little did we know how much. From cavemen to scholars, people have been drawn to fire pits, water coolers, theaters and grave sites to share stories, which have long been at the core of the arts, novels, movies and plays. But since the postmodern literary movement of the 1960s swept out of academia and into the wider culture, narrative thinking has seeped into other fields.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Set in upstate New York during the Civil War, "Copperhead" is an adaption of an 1893 Harold Frederic novel that concerns itself not with North versus South so much as the less-discussed disagreements among those ostensibly on the same side of history. Farmer Abner Beech (Billy Campbell) is against slavery but also opposes the war and sending local boys off to fight it, whereas Jee Hagadorn (Angus MacFadyen) believes ending slavery is worth any sacrifice and turns many of the local townspeople against Beech.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1998 | DAWN BONKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fidgety kids grow calm and focused. Boy Scout troops sit still. Students who despise history suddenly change their minds. What's the magic elixir? Not an eye-popping movie blockbuster or virtual-reality playground. It's simple, ancient and low-tech: storytelling. And chances are it's happening just about every week of the year at a mall, your kid's school, bookstore, library or museum near you.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Storyteller Bill Harley had a tentful of kids enraptured Saturday in San Juan Capistrano. With changing facial expressions, whoops and whispers, he had them rolling in laughter with a morality tale filled with talking dragons, bicycles and bubbling glasses of orange juice. The only people enjoying it more than the children, perhaps, were their parents, who were hollering and laughing right along.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Who would have thought that one of the world's most famous scientists finds time to take in a little television? Whether it's crime dramas or "The Simpsons," Stephen Hawking tunes in. He'd even like to participate in a certain popular dance reality competition. "I'm still waiting for my invitation to 'Dancing With the Stars,' " Hawking joked via a taped message at the Television Critics' Assn. press tour in Pasadena. Until then, he's part of the upcoming Discovery Channel special "Into the Universe With Stephen Hawking."
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