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SPORTS
January 17, 2009
The Angels' relative lack of off-season activity is typical of teams who have just won the World Series. If only they had. Ron Reeve Glendora
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SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
A big polluter could be blazing inside your kitchen, its blue flames glowing under your tea kettle or frying pan. A new study says cooking with a gas stove can expose you to unhealthy levels of air pollution. About two-thirds of Southern California households that use natural gas burners without proper ventilation breathe levels of air pollution so high that they would exceed federal health standards outdoors, scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory found.
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FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
A quick look at my home kitchen and you might think I was an avowed minimalist. One pot, a few saucepans and a cherished cast-iron skillet. A cupboard of bakeware and bowls and counter space for just a few appliances. All the gadgets that can fit in one small drawer. A few chosen knives. Noble? I wish. A would-be cookware junkie, I'm saved from bingeing on tools and equipment only by the postage-stamp size of my cooking space. To make it in my kitchen, an item has to be essential.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Just when I've sworn off buying any more kitchen gadgets, along comes another must-have. And it's just in time for grilling season. I've tried all kinds of grilling and baking gloves and mitts over the years and these heat-proof gloves from Trudeau are the best I've found. While most oven-proof mitts are made from bulky quilted fabric that is only a little more flexible than a body cast, these are made from heat-resistant armaid fiber, the same stuff that is used by firefighters.
FOOD
March 4, 2010 | Noelle Carter
The other day, I just couldn't shake the thought of slow-smoking some ribs. I was in the mood for Memphis-style baby backs, the meat fall-off-the-bone tender, a simple dry rub tantalizingly complicated with deep hickory notes, the flavors drawn out with a tart vinegar-Dijon mop. There's a primal wonder to smoked food — that such depth of flavor can come from so simple a technique. And then, of course, there's the lure of the sunny afternoon spent in a lawn chair with a cold beer while you're waiting, patiently, for the Weber to work its magic.
NEWS
April 1, 1985 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
Some homeowners do battle with termites or fungus; the Beach family household in this Owens Valley community appears to be threatened by a different sort of nuisance--rust, 12 tons of it, by Dick Beach's estimate. A sixth-grade teacher at the Home Street Elementary School, Beach triggered the pestilence 15 years ago when he found a decrepit three-legged miner's stove on a hike in the White Mountains and decided to lug it home.
HOME & GARDEN
November 13, 2010 | By Ariel Swartley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
She's an unlikely traffic stopper: hefty, over 50, her complexion a grassy green and yellow. But, David Aikens says, people driving past his Inglewood store often stop to ogle this voluptuously contoured gas stove, manufactured at the beginning of the baby boom era. According to Aikens, the stove's restorer, lust for these Midcentury beauties is found not only among cooks, who appreciate the heat-retaining properties of their cast-iron burners and...
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | BOB SIPCHEN
"Dog treed a mountain lion last night; coffee's over there," John Jones drawled, offering his first words to a couple of unfamiliar flatlanders up poking around in his neck of the woods one morning. Back in a corner of the Holy Jim Volunteer Fire Department's fire barn, a big pot of coffee simmered on a wood-burning stove.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | Associated Press
A cat named Screamer was back with his owner Thursday after being blamed for a fire at a house where he had been staying. Gilbert L. Cabana said the cat pulled a window curtain down on the electric stove Wednesday morning and then went for a stroll on the push-button stove controls, turning two burners on high. "I was in there sleeping," Cabana said, pointing to his bedroom. "The cat came in and woke me up. He was screaming at me. I heard a snap, crackle and pop."
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
Matthew Fassberg wants to heat up your kitchen. He owns Ovenarts, a line of '30s- to '50s-era stoves re-porcelainized in a variety of, well, hot colors. This is not your mother's stove (prices start at $2,200). There's no plain white here--except as an accent on this burning-red version with blue and yellow knobs or that black number with one white door. Fassberg concocts a color scheme to fit your home; you choose the stove model from his Polaroids.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously overturned the first-degree murder conviction of a man who stole appliances and caused a fatal accident an hour later when a stove fell off his truck. Cole Allen Wilkins of Long Beach was convicted under the "felony-murder rule," which says a defendant may be convicted of first-degree murder if someone dies while the suspect is committing a felony, such as a burglary or rape. Intention to kill is not required for conviction.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
NORTH POLE, Alaska - In Krystal Francesco's neighborhood, known here as the "rectangle of death," the air pollution recently was so thick she could hardly see across the street. Wood stoves were cranking all over town - it was 40 below zero - and she had to take her daughter to the emergency room. "She's crying because she can't breathe, and I can just see her stomach rapidly going in and out. Sometimes, she's coughing to the point of throwing up," Francesco said of her 2½-year-old daughter, Kalli, who uses two different inhalers.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Sometimes nothing beats smoking a nice cut of meat outdoors on a lazy, hot day -- that is, as long as the weather cooperates. But the great outdoors can get a little testy, especially during these winter months. Even in Southern California. Next time you're hankering for a smoked rack of ribs, consider smoking in the great indoors, right on your stove top. Stove-top smoking is certainly not a new concept: Scatter some wood chips in a roasting pan, put the meat on a rack to sit above it. Loosely cover the pan with foil, and heat.
SPORTS
July 25, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Hanging with my homies at a Galaxy game — or are they hooligans? That's what I'm here to find out. To be specific, I am with the L.A.-based fan club of Tottenham Hotspur of the English Premier League, a boisterous but likable bunch of chaps with British accents and David Letterman hairlines. Most are transplants from across the pond, which leaves you thankful — after a few beers — that there is indeed a pond (I now think of it as more of a moat). Thanks to transplants like them, and the global spread of pro sports in general, U.S. interest in the Premier League seems to grow every year.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2011 | By Spencer Soper, Morning Call
When Peter Kupec was a boy, his mother cooked on a coal stove in the kitchen, which heated the whole house. Now 80, Kupec still uses coal to heat his Lansford home in Pennsylvania's anthracite region, which is estimated to have billions of tons of coal deposits to fuel industry and warm living rooms for centuries. So he was surprised when he called a dealer a few weeks ago to buy two tons of coal. "They said 'My God, I don't know when we can deliver it,'" Kupec said. "It might be six to eight weeks.
FOOD
December 8, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
A quick look at my home kitchen and you might think I was an avowed minimalist. One pot, a few saucepans and a cherished cast-iron skillet. A cupboard of bakeware and bowls and counter space for just a few appliances. All the gadgets that can fit in one small drawer. A few chosen knives. Noble? I wish. A would-be cookware junkie, I'm saved from bingeing on tools and equipment only by the postage-stamp size of my cooking space. To make it in my kitchen, an item has to be essential.
FOOD
May 6, 1998
I have a theory about Dutch ovens and why they are called Dutch ovens ("In the Kitchen: The Dutch Question," April 22). Holland is, of course, incredibly small; people live very packed together in housing that tends to be tiny. Kitchens also tend to be very small. As a result of this lack of room, ovens are minuscule and, particularly in the past, were often omitted in favor of stove-top burners. As a result, the Dutch still cook almost everything on top of the stove in those large pots or Dutch ovens.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Johnny Carson says he's going to buy a new stove and refrigerator for two elderly Georgia sisters who spent 20 years fighting city hall over their water bills. Carolyn Freeman, 70, told Carson Friday night how she and her sister had for 20 years paid their neighbor's water bill in addition to their own because both lines were connected to their meter. Freeman described how they had skimped on water by taking sponge baths and eating canned beans to avoid using water to wash fresh vegetables.
SPORTS
November 1, 2011 | KEVIN BAXTER
Now that the games are over, let the gamesmanship begin. That, of course, would be the ritual mating dance of baseball free agency, which officially began Sunday, less than 26 hours after the St. Louis Cardinals capped one of the most exciting postseasons in recent memory by outlasting the Texas Rangers in the World Series. More than 148 players have either willingly entered the marketplace or been cast there against their will, from likely Hall of Famers Albert Pujols, Jim Thome and David Ortiz and National League batting champion Jose Reyes to journeymen such as Greg Dobbs, Sergio Mitre and Miguel Batista.
SPORTS
September 24, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
Teams spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the free-agent market last year on players who didn't produce. (Sorry, no refunds, no exchanges.) And they'll spend millions more this winter. So with the hot stove already beginning to warm up, Times staff writer Kevin Baxter takes a look at the top 10 free agents expected to be available this winter and the top 10 flops in 2011 (statistics through Friday): The class of 2012 Albert Pujols, St. Louis: A Gold Glove first baseman, Pujols has averaged .329, 40 home runs, 121 runs batted in and 117 runs over 11 seasons.
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