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Stowaways

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter and Joe Serna
A teenager who apparently stowed away on a Hawaiian Airlines flight from San Jose to Maui may have stayed warm because of the plane's landing gear, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Heat from the plane's hydraulic lines in the wheel well, as well as heat retained in the tires, could have helped the stowaway survive as the aircraft climbed to altitudes with sub-zero temperatures, the FAA reported. In addition, the plane's steady climb to high altitudes may allow a person to drift into unconsciousness as oxygen becomes scarce.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna and Kurt Streeter
A teenager who stowed away on a flight from San Jose to Hawaii and survived has been turned over to child protective services and is unlikely to face criminal charges, the FBI said. The 16-year-old had run away from home when he climbed a fence at San Jose's Mineta international airport on Sunday morning and crawled into the left rear wheel well of  Hawaiian Airlines  flight 45. “He was not planning on going to Hawaii,” said FBI Honolulu spokesman Tom Simon. “He just got on a plane.” Authorities called it a “miracle” that the teen survived the 5 1/2-hour flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Joseph Serna
San Jose International Airport said it is reviewing how a teenager who stowed away on a flight from San Jose to Hawaii managed to get on the airport's runway without being detected by security. Authorities say security video shows the teen from Santa Clara hopping a fence at the San Jose airport and climbing into the wheel well of a jetliner.  It's unclear how long the boy was on the tarmac and why security officials didn't detect he was there. The 16-year-old survived the flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A teenager who stowed away on a flight from San Jose to Hawaii and survived did not know where the plane was headed when he climbed aboard, FBI officials said Monday. The 16-year-old, who has not yet been charged with a crime, had run away from home when he climbed a fence at San Jose's Mineta International Airport om Sunday morning and crawled into the left rear wheel well of Hawaiian Airlines flight 45. “He was not planning on going to Hawaii,” said FBI Honolulu spokesman Tom Simon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Authorities said it was a "miracle" that a 16-year-old boy from Santa Clara survived a flight from California to Hawaii in the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines jet. Security video from San Jose's Mineta International Airport verified that the teen hopped a fence and made his way to Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45, then managed to climb up the wheel well of the plane and stow away without being detected. He emerged unharmed despite freezing temperatures and a lack of oxygen on a flight that reached an altitude of 38,000 feet, an FBI official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Kate Mather and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped Mineta San Jose International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara wandered onto a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767. Then he disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until later Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him 2,350 miles to the west, walking on the tarmac at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous, 5 1/2 -hour odyssey - enduring frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the jet's wheel well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Kate Mather, Joseph Serna and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped San Jose Mineta International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara made his way on to a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767, then disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until late Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him, 2,350 miles to the west, wandering on another tarmac, this one at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous 5 1/2-hour odyssey - weathering frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a flight compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines jet. The transoceanic misadventure left authorities questioning both how the stowaway so easily gained access to the jumbo jet and how he survived with so little apparent trauma.
SCIENCE
May 6, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Ports like Los Angeles and Long Beach are key to the global economy: crossroads where billions of dollars in cargo arrive and depart each year , floating on board thousands of vessels from all over the world. Increasingly, however, large ports are also playing a key role in Earth's ecosystem, as species from all corners stow away on ships and make their way into ports -- sometimes, with devastating consequences for native wildlife.  For example, the Chinese mitten crab , which comes from the Pacific Coast of China and Korea, made its way to the U.S. West Coast on ships during the early 1990s and was first spotted in the Chesapeake Bay about 15 years later.  Fisherman catching shrimp have reported that the mitten crabs, which have patches of hair on their claws , get tangled in nets and can kill shrimp.  Because they burrow, invasive mitten crabs can also speed erosion in levees and banks.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Federal and New Jersey authorities are methodically searching a cargo ship in a Newark harbor after a routine inspection of the vessel yielded a surprising outcome: When inspectors tapped on one container, they heard tapping back. "No voices. ... They tapped and they could hear tapping back," said Fannie Wilkes, lieutenant junior grade of the  U.S. Coast Guard's New York Command Center.  Wilkes told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday morning that the ship, whose last port of call was Egypt, was then taken into Port Newark Container Terminal, which was its destination anyway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2011 | By Andrew Blankstein and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Virgin America Flight 415 from New York to Los Angeles was already two hours into its journey when some passengers in the upscale "Main Cabin Select" section complained that the man seated in 3E reeked of body odor. A flight attendant asked Olajide Oluwaseun Noibi for his boarding pass and was surprised to see it was from a different fight and in someone else's name. She alerted authorities, and Noibi went back to sleep in his black leather airline seat. When the plane landed, authorities chose not to arrest Noibi, allowing him to leave the airport.
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