Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStradivarius
IN THE NEWS

Stradivarius

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By David Ng
The viola is often considered to be the neglected stepchild of the orchestra, stuck in between the more visible violins and cellos. Violists are sometimes referred to pejoratively as failed violinists. But in June, a 300-year-old viola will take the spotlight at a Sotheby's sale where the asking price will start at $45 million. The sale is being co-organized with the instrument dealer Ingles & Hayday. The so-called "Macdonald" viola was one of only a handful of violas created by Antonio Stradivari in his lifetime.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By David Ng
The viola is often considered to be the neglected stepchild of the orchestra, stuck in between the more visible violins and cellos. Violists are sometimes referred to pejoratively as failed violinists. But in June, a 300-year-old viola will take the spotlight at a Sotheby's sale where the asking price will start at $45 million. The sale is being co-organized with the instrument dealer Ingles & Hayday. The so-called "Macdonald" viola was one of only a handful of violas created by Antonio Stradivari in his lifetime.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Over the centuries, Stradivarius has become the standard for the best in stringed instruments. With the recovery of a stolen 300-year-old Strad violin, a Milwaukee musician will once again be able to make sweet music. The instrument, known as the Lipinski Strad after a famed Polish virtuoso who owned it in the 19th century, was stolen Jan. 27 during the armed robbery of Frank Almond, the concertmaster for the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. Almond had just finished a concert when he was attacked by someone who used a stun gun and who seized the instrument, worth an estimated $5 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By David Ng
A 300-year-old Stradivarius violin that was stolen last month from the concertmaster of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra has been recovered by authorities, according to a Thursday report from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. [Updated: Milwaukee police confirmed the recovery of the violin on Thursday.] Milwaukee police said Wednesday that three suspects -- two men, ages 42 and 36, and a woman, 32 -- were arrested in connection with the crime and remained in police custody. The violin -- which is valued at $5 million -- was taken from Milwaukee Symphony concertmaster Frank Almond during an armed robbery on Jan. 27. Robbers used a stun gun on the violinist after a concert at Wisconsin Lutheran College in suburban Milwaukee, according to reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2009 | Emily Langer, Langer writes for the Washington Post.
Carleen Hutchins, a violin maker who crafted some of the finest instruments of her time, invented new ones and, through science, came as close as anyone ever has to reproducing the venerated sound of the Stradivarius, died Aug. 7 at her home in Wolfeboro, N.H. Hutchins, 98, had congestive heart failure. She spent six decades challenging the widely held belief that no modern craftsman -- or woman -- could compete with Antonio Stradivari and other 17th and 18th century violin makers from Cremona, Italy, whose instruments are among the most prized possessions in classical music.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
'I can make any student violin sound like a Stradivarius.' --Alfredo Galea Alfredo Galea has a subversive idea. In the world of violins, he says, older is not necessarily better. When one listens to a truly great instrument, he says, "what they hear is . . . not the age" but the varnish. It is a simple concept, yet one that has made the spectacled, balding gentleman a controversial figure among area musicians and the recipient of both lavish praise and bitter scorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Chris Pasles
David Garrett, whose fashion model looks have led him to be dubbed the David Beckham of the violin, will be lent a Stradivarius to play at a Valentine Day's concert tonight at the Barbican Centre in London. It will replace his own priceless Strad, which he accidentally smashed after a concert there Dec. 27. "People said it was as if I'd trodden on a banana skin," the German-born violinist, 26, told London's Evening Standard on Wednesday. "I fell down a flight of steps and onto the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
If Huguette Clark can remember her younger days, she may fondly recall the Santa Barbara estate where a private railroad car deposited her family every winter. At 104, she may linger on memories of debutante parties and society luncheons, or of musicales featuring the Paganini Quartet, equipped with Stradivarius instruments courtesy of her mother. Then again, she may not remember a thing. She resides at a New York hospital ? her home for more than 20 years. By all accounts, it's been at least half a century since she last set foot in the 22,000-square-foot house that for years was tended as if a telegram might at any moment signal Clark's arrival.
NEWS
February 27, 2002 | GINA PICCALO AND LOUISE ROUG
When Grammy nominee Joshua Bell fell in love last fall, he had to get rid of the "old one" before he could pursue the object of his affection. "I had feelings of guilt," said 34-year-old violinist. "It was painful to let go ... but I was smitten by the new one." Eventually, Bell (who was judged among the most beautiful by People magazine two years ago) got what he wanted: the red Stradivarius that he will be bringing to the Grammys tonight. "It's a kind of chemistry that's hard to describe," he says of his feelings for the $3.5-million violin, "like love at first sight."
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | From Reuters
An anonymous U.S. foundation bought a Stradivarius violin for $349,000 at Sotheby's today and will present it to Viktoria Mullova, a Soviet violinist who defected to the United States two years ago.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Over the centuries, Stradivarius has become the standard for the best in stringed instruments. With the recovery of a stolen 300-year-old Strad violin, a Milwaukee musician will once again be able to make sweet music. The instrument, known as the Lipinski Strad after a famed Polish virtuoso who owned it in the 19th century, was stolen Jan. 27 during the armed robbery of Frank Almond, the concertmaster for the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. Almond had just finished a concert when he was attacked by someone who used a stun gun and who seized the instrument, worth an estimated $5 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By David Ng
The mystery of a 17th-century Stradivarius violin that was stolen in 2010 has been successfully solved, much to the relief of its owner. British authorities announced this week that the violin and its two bows were recovered with some minor damage at a house in England. The 1696 instrument is worth an estimated $1.8 million and belonged to violinist Min Jin Kym. "Investigators leading the hunt for the 300-year-old instrument have verified the find with antiques experts and the violin is now being held in a secure London location," said the British Transport Police in a statement released on Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By David Ng
The strange case of a stolen Stradivarius violin belonging to London-based musician Min-Jin Kym has taken another twist. The instrument that officials recovered this year in Bulgaria has turned out to be a replica, not the 17th century instrument that they were looking for, according to reports. British authorities said this week they believe the recovered violin is a replica used for training, and that it was made no more than 100 years ago, according to reports from the BBC News and the Telegraph.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Quietly giddy, Sarah Thornblade sat on the couch of a Pasadena home nervously anticipating the encounter. She'd been waiting for this moment for weeks; when it finally came she wasted no time. Thornblade stood, unzipped a soft, green case and extended both hands, carefully lifting her much awaited blind date: an $8-million Stradivarius violin. The connection last week was a test run for a more intimate rendezvous coming Thursday. Thornblade, second violin for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, will play the coveted instrument during the orchestra's all-Bach Valentine's Day concert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
If Huguette Clark can remember her younger days, she may fondly recall the Santa Barbara estate where a private railroad car deposited her family every winter. At 104, she may linger on memories of debutante parties and society luncheons, or of musicales featuring the Paganini Quartet, equipped with Stradivarius instruments courtesy of her mother. Then again, she may not remember a thing. She resides at a New York hospital ? her home for more than 20 years. By all accounts, it's been at least half a century since she last set foot in the 22,000-square-foot house that for years was tended as if a telegram might at any moment signal Clark's arrival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2009 | Emily Langer, Langer writes for the Washington Post.
Carleen Hutchins, a violin maker who crafted some of the finest instruments of her time, invented new ones and, through science, came as close as anyone ever has to reproducing the venerated sound of the Stradivarius, died Aug. 7 at her home in Wolfeboro, N.H. Hutchins, 98, had congestive heart failure. She spent six decades challenging the widely held belief that no modern craftsman -- or woman -- could compete with Antonio Stradivari and other 17th and 18th century violin makers from Cremona, Italy, whose instruments are among the most prized possessions in classical music.
MAGAZINE
March 5, 2006
Carla Shapreau's story on the Alcantara Stradivarius violin was spellbinding ("Lost and Found. And Lost Again?" Feb. 12). I savored every word of her artfully written, passionate recollection of her part in returning the Stradivarius to UCLA. Sadly, at the end of Shapreau's story, the ugly head of greed showed its face in the form of UCLA's contemplated sale of the violin. To sell it would be a betrayal of the generous gift of Genevieve Vedder to UCLA. It is apparent that her gift was a gift to the future of music, a gift to students and ordinary people to be administered by a trusted institution of learning.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A woman who returned a 1713 Stradivarius violin that her husband stole in 1936 should have shared the $263,000 finder's fee with her stepdaughter, the state Supreme Court ruled. Marcelle Hall, who was an administrator of her husband's estate, had argued that she should keep the entire reward because a thief's descendants should not benefit from his crime. Her lawyer has denied the estate was entitled to the fee, and she argues she is being penalized for trying to do the right thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Chris Pasles
David Garrett, whose fashion model looks have led him to be dubbed the David Beckham of the violin, will be lent a Stradivarius to play at a Valentine Day's concert tonight at the Barbican Centre in London. It will replace his own priceless Strad, which he accidentally smashed after a concert there Dec. 27. "People said it was as if I'd trodden on a banana skin," the German-born violinist, 26, told London's Evening Standard on Wednesday. "I fell down a flight of steps and onto the case.
MAGAZINE
March 5, 2006
Carla Shapreau's story on the Alcantara Stradivarius violin was spellbinding ("Lost and Found. And Lost Again?" Feb. 12). I savored every word of her artfully written, passionate recollection of her part in returning the Stradivarius to UCLA. Sadly, at the end of Shapreau's story, the ugly head of greed showed its face in the form of UCLA's contemplated sale of the violin. To sell it would be a betrayal of the generous gift of Genevieve Vedder to UCLA. It is apparent that her gift was a gift to the future of music, a gift to students and ordinary people to be administered by a trusted institution of learning.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|