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Strain

SPORTS
February 1, 1992
Let one country vilify itself in small-minded bigotry while the rest of the world supports the lifelong wish of one of its brightest citizens. Let this virulent strain of human-bashing be shown for the aberrance it is, and let the Games begin. SCOTT PATRICK WAGNER Santa Monica
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OPINION
November 3, 2005
Re "Bush's Flu Plan Stresses Vaccine," Nov. 2 I could drain the English language dry in describing the colossal foolishness of President Bush's plan to vaccinate 20 million Americans against the current strain of avian flu. Why so? Because the current strain of avian flu, due to its lack of human-to-human transmissibility, poses no significant threat. The virus must mutate to achieve the feared scenario of rapid human-to-human transmission while retaining its lethal potential. Vaccination against the current strain will most likely provide little to no protection whatsoever against the new, deadly, mutated strain.
SCIENCE
September 14, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Health authorities have detected the emergence of a rare but deadly lung-destroying form of pneumonia, sparked by the combination of a skin infection and the common flu. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 22 deaths among children last year from the dual infection. Numbers from the 2007-2008 flu season won't be released until next month, but officials say deaths have increased. The CDC has just begun tracking cases among all age groups. The number of fatalities, though low, is a sharp increase from previous years, and infectious disease experts worry that an ongoing epidemic of skin infections could drive the numbers higher.
SPORTS
May 31, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Reality called the Dodgers on Thursday, and it might as well have been a siren beckoning them onto the rocky shore. The results of an MRI on Matt Kemp' s hamstring showed he not only reinjured the original strain Wednesday but suffered a second one. Dodgers trainer Sue Falsone said Kemp is expected to be out of the lineup for at least four weeks. That's a best-case scenario, and Falsone said she was uncertain if he would be able to return to a major-league game by then.
NEWS
January 28, 1985
Three cases of the Philippine flu --the first strain of influenza discovered this season--have been confirmed, Los Angeles County health officials said. Dr. Betty Agee, chief of the county Health Department's acute communicable disease control division, said it is encouraging that the cases were discovered so late in the flu season, which is traditionally between December and March in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995 | From Times staff writers
Big 'roos bounce better--and a couple of Australian researchers believe they can explain why. Reporting in Nature, M.B. Bennett and G.C. Taylor of the University of Queensland found that when the feet of a kangaroo hit the ground, the tendons in its hind legs stretch like rubber bands, absorbing part of the energy. As the kangaroo begins its next hop, the tendons contract and shoot the animal forward. The larger the kangaroo, the greater the strain on the tendons. That increases the amount of energy that can be stored between hops and allows for more efficient hops, the researchers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993
I just found out recently that we who oppose the dump are wrong. Do you know why? Because we ("the opposition," as Supervisor Maggie Kildee's spokesman calls us) are claiming 600 trucks will make the trip to the dump each day, whereas Supervisor Kildee's office says "only 100" trucks will take a dump at the dump. Only 100? Let's see--figuring on an eight-hour day, that comes out to only one truck every 4.8 minutes. That should make us all breathe a little easier, while our air becomes filthier, our lives unhealthier and California 33 gradually cracks under the strain.
SPORTS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
On May 31, 1911, the day after the first Indianapolis 500, the Indianapolis News carried an editorial reading, in part, "Interesting and thrilling as was the race at the Speedway yesterday, it is to be hoped we have seen the last of these 500-mile contests. "The winning driver (Ray Harroun) said that the limit had been reached and that the strain of the participants was far too great. . . . So it seems we have gone too far in this form of sports. . . . " Harroun's average speed for the 500 miles was 74.59 m.p.h.
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