Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStrain
IN THE NEWS

Strain

OPINION
November 3, 2005
Re "Bush's Flu Plan Stresses Vaccine," Nov. 2 I could drain the English language dry in describing the colossal foolishness of President Bush's plan to vaccinate 20 million Americans against the current strain of avian flu. Why so? Because the current strain of avian flu, due to its lack of human-to-human transmissibility, poses no significant threat. The virus must mutate to achieve the feared scenario of rapid human-to-human transmission while retaining its lethal potential. Vaccination against the current strain will most likely provide little to no protection whatsoever against the new, deadly, mutated strain.
Advertisement
HEALTH
September 14, 2009 | Melissa Healy
Tammy Reed, the 28-year-old mother of a toddler, is not given to belief in conspiracy theories and is not the type to be rattled by the phrase "pandemic flu." The Menifee, Calif., resident is the kind of mom who gathers a good deal of her medical intelligence on government websites, trusts a friend who is a nurse practitioner and is raising her bright, strong-willed daughter with all the confidence of a former nanny and the second-born in a family of six. She's the kind of mom who thinks that when the vaccine for H1N1 influenza becomes available for her daughter, she may just take a pass on it. "It's a different brand of flu, but it is still the flu, and I think she's already built a pretty strong immune system," Reed says of her blond, blue-eyed 14-month-old.
NEWS
January 28, 1985
Three cases of the Philippine flu --the first strain of influenza discovered this season--have been confirmed, Los Angeles County health officials said. Dr. Betty Agee, chief of the county Health Department's acute communicable disease control division, said it is encouraging that the cases were discovered so late in the flu season, which is traditionally between December and March in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995 | From Times staff writers
Big 'roos bounce better--and a couple of Australian researchers believe they can explain why. Reporting in Nature, M.B. Bennett and G.C. Taylor of the University of Queensland found that when the feet of a kangaroo hit the ground, the tendons in its hind legs stretch like rubber bands, absorbing part of the energy. As the kangaroo begins its next hop, the tendons contract and shoot the animal forward. The larger the kangaroo, the greater the strain on the tendons. That increases the amount of energy that can be stored between hops and allows for more efficient hops, the researchers said.
SCIENCE
July 3, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
The United Nations sent Nepalese peacekeeping troops to bring relief to Haiti after it was devastated by a 7.0 earthquake in 2010. A new study concludes the peacekeepers brought something else, as well -- cholera, triggering an epidemic that has sickened hundreds of thousands of Haitians and killed more than 8,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After sequencing the DNA of 23 samples of the cholera-causing bacterium from Haiti and comparing them to the DNA of strains found elsewhere, researchers said the outbreak could be traced to Nepal , where the disease is endemic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
West Hollywood city officials and community leaders warned residents Friday about a serious case of  meningococcal infection  recently found in Los Angeles County, a bacteria-caused illness that can lead to potentially deadly  meningitis . "We don't want to panic people," said West Hollywood City Councilman John Duran. "But we learned 30 years ago the consequences of delay in the response to AIDS. We are sounding the alarm that sexually active gay men need to be aware that we have a strain of meningitis that is deadly on our hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993
I just found out recently that we who oppose the dump are wrong. Do you know why? Because we ("the opposition," as Supervisor Maggie Kildee's spokesman calls us) are claiming 600 trucks will make the trip to the dump each day, whereas Supervisor Kildee's office says "only 100" trucks will take a dump at the dump. Only 100? Let's see--figuring on an eight-hour day, that comes out to only one truck every 4.8 minutes. That should make us all breathe a little easier, while our air becomes filthier, our lives unhealthier and California 33 gradually cracks under the strain.
SPORTS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
On May 31, 1911, the day after the first Indianapolis 500, the Indianapolis News carried an editorial reading, in part, "Interesting and thrilling as was the race at the Speedway yesterday, it is to be hoped we have seen the last of these 500-mile contests. "The winning driver (Ray Harroun) said that the limit had been reached and that the strain of the participants was far too great. . . . So it seems we have gone too far in this form of sports. . . . " Harroun's average speed for the 500 miles was 74.59 m.p.h.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|