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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"In the City of Sylvia," a 2007 film by the Spanish writer and director José Luis Guerín, runs a mere 80 minutes and has almost no dialogue and the barest semblance of a plot. But from seemingly minimal means, Guerín fashions a gorgeous object and an endlessly suggestive experience: a love story, a city symphony, a surrealist fable and a self-reflexive meditation on the thrill and the danger of looking. A cult hit on the festival circuit — new to DVD May 24 from Cinema Guild — "Sylvia" follows the romantic quest of an unnamed young man over three days in the French city of Strasbourg.
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NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Ted Rall
Gov. Jerry Brown has a dream, a dream that would serve as his greatest legacy: a high-speed train that would slash the six-hour drive from Los Angeles to San Francisco to a relaxing ride a smidge over two hours. It may seem like a pipe dream now, but similar links have transformed other countries. When I visited Paris as a kid, the eastern city of Strasbourg was a weird, remote border town where people spoke German and claimed to like black blood sausages. Thanks to France's TGV trains, an all-day schlep is a quick day trip now - two hours each way - that paved the way for Strasbourg to become an important headquarters for European Union bureaucrats and Eurozone business types.
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WORLD
November 20, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In a bid to save money, time and the environment, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to abandon its redundant meeting site in the French city of Strasbourg and gather instead at bloc headquarters in Brussels. But as convincing as the 483-141 vote was in highlighting the waste of having 766 Brussels-based lawmakers shuttle to Strasbourg for mandatory monthly sessions, the decision is likely to be only symbolic for the time being. Under European Union rules dating to the parliament's founding in 1952, any fundamental change in operations must be approved unanimously by what are now 28 member states.
WORLD
November 20, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In a bid to save money, time and the environment, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to abandon its redundant meeting site in the French city of Strasbourg and gather instead at bloc headquarters in Brussels. But as convincing as the 483-141 vote was in highlighting the waste of having 766 Brussels-based lawmakers shuttle to Strasbourg for mandatory monthly sessions, the decision is likely to be only symbolic for the time being. Under European Union rules dating to the parliament's founding in 1952, any fundamental change in operations must be approved unanimously by what are now 28 member states.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
River tours of Europe continue to be the rage, but there's another way to hit the water on a smaller, more intimate vessel: barge cruises. They're super small -- 12 cabins accommodating 24 passengers -- and go at a more leisurely pace than river cruises. CroisiEurope offers a seven-day cruise on the Madeleine along the Marne-Rhine Canal in eastern France. The trip begins in Strasbourg and ends in the Moselle region, traveling past the fields of the Zorn Valley and villages on the way to Saverne.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Ted Rall
Gov. Jerry Brown has a dream, a dream that would serve as his greatest legacy: a high-speed train that would slash the six-hour drive from Los Angeles to San Francisco to a relaxing ride a smidge over two hours. It may seem like a pipe dream now, but similar links have transformed other countries. When I visited Paris as a kid, the eastern city of Strasbourg was a weird, remote border town where people spoke German and claimed to like black blood sausages. Thanks to France's TGV trains, an all-day schlep is a quick day trip now - two hours each way - that paved the way for Strasbourg to become an important headquarters for European Union bureaucrats and Eurozone business types.
NEWS
May 5, 1985 | BEN SHERWOOD, Times Staff Writer
At 11:30 p.m. on a recent Thursday, while this provincial town on the Franco-German frontier was closing its doors for the night, the European Parliament was still in session on the outskirts of town. There was nothing unusual about this midnight meeting, which Strasbourgers and members of the Parliament jokingly call the "Late Show."
NEWS
January 31, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Joseph Klifa of Mulhouse issued a call to his citizens to crowd into the square beneath the ornate 16th-Century City Hall and welcome Premier Jacques Chirac to this industrial town of 115,000 in Alsace on the German border. But when the tall, smiling, hand-waving Chirac arrived Monday, no more than 500 townspeople stood in the square to greet him, including a score of Socialists who whistled and held up jeering signs.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West Germany has the most "successful" cities in Western Europe, according to a recent survey done for the European Economic Community. The study analyzed 103 metropolitan areas for livability and economic health and found that overall, West German cities ranked highest.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1987 | RUTH REICHL
We were sitting in a cafe in Cassis, watching fishermen wander in and out of the restaurants along the old port. The air smelled of salt and licorice and the sun went skittering across the water. We had just finished the world's best ratatouille-- eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, peppers and onions cooked slowly into a sort of hearty jam. Patricia Wells was taking notes. "I cook the vegetables separately, madame," said the proprietress, "and only combine them at the last minute."
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
River tours of Europe continue to be the rage, but there's another way to hit the water on a smaller, more intimate vessel: barge cruises. They're super small -- 12 cabins accommodating 24 passengers -- and go at a more leisurely pace than river cruises. CroisiEurope offers a seven-day cruise on the Madeleine along the Marne-Rhine Canal in eastern France. The trip begins in Strasbourg and ends in the Moselle region, traveling past the fields of the Zorn Valley and villages on the way to Saverne.
TRAVEL
May 29, 2011
THE BEST WAY TO STRASBOURG, FRANCE From LAX, Air France and Lufthansa offer connecting service (change of plane) to Strasbourg. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $574, excluding taxes and fees, until June 30. TELEPHONES To call the numbers below from the U.S., dial 011 (the international dialing code), 33 (country code for France), 3 (regional code) and the local number. WHAT TO DO Musée du Cristal de Saint-Louis/Cristalleries de Saint Louis, Rue Coëtlosquet, Saint-Louis-lès Bitche; 87-06-40-04, http://www.tourisme-lorraine.fr/fr/pageTouristique.asp?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"In the City of Sylvia," a 2007 film by the Spanish writer and director José Luis Guerín, runs a mere 80 minutes and has almost no dialogue and the barest semblance of a plot. But from seemingly minimal means, Guerín fashions a gorgeous object and an endlessly suggestive experience: a love story, a city symphony, a surrealist fable and a self-reflexive meditation on the thrill and the danger of looking. A cult hit on the festival circuit — new to DVD May 24 from Cinema Guild — "Sylvia" follows the romantic quest of an unnamed young man over three days in the French city of Strasbourg.
SPORTS
May 23, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Top-seeded Lindsay Davenport was upset in the final of the Strasbourg Open in France on Saturday by Claudine Schaul, who is ranked 66th and won her first WTA Tour title. Schaul won, 2-6, 6-0, 6-3, beating a player who is ranked No. 4 and is a three-time Grand Slam tournament champion. On her way to the final of the clay-court tuneup for the French Open, she beat three seeded players -- No. 5 Tina Pisnik, No. 2 Ai Sugiyama and No. 4 Emilie Loit.
WORLD
March 11, 2003 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Four Algerians believed to belong to an Al Qaeda-linked terrorist cell were found guilty in a German court Monday of conspiracy to commit murder in a foiled plot to blow up a French Christmas market and cathedral in December 2000. The four men were handed prison sentences ranging from 10 to 12 years, capping a closely watched case that investigators considered important to understanding the workings of Al Qaeda throughout Europe.
SPORTS
May 25, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
One week after suffering her worst defeat of her tennis career, Steffi Graf appears to have regained her forehand stroke in the final tuneup for the French Open. Graf beat 15-year-old Mirjana Lucic of Croatia, 6-2, 7-5, Saturday in the final of the Strasbourg Open in France for her first victory of the year. Lucic lost for the first time in her second pro tournament.
NEWS
December 1, 1992
Militant French farmers, opposed to international agricultural trade reforms pushed by the Bush Administration, hope to rally farmers from other European states to their cause in a massive demonstration today at the seat of the European Parliament. Protest organizers expect more than 50,000--including a strong showing from across the Rhine in Germany--to join them in opposing a Nov. 21 agreement between U.S. and European Community representatives on oilseed subsidies.
NEWS
January 11, 1994
The European Parliament, meeting in plenary session beginning next Monday, plans to discuss expansion of the European Union, formerly known as the European Community. A final decision may still be months away, but the proposal to add four new members to the 12-nation body--Finland, Austria, Norway, and Sweden--already has been the subject of negotiations and controversy on the continent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | KATHIE JENKINS
In a country where Michelin stars are more important than Hollywood stars, there's been speculation for weeks in France on who would be the winners and losers in this year's most powerful guidebook awards. And the envelopes please. Antoine Westermann of Restaurant Buerehiesel in Strasbourg was the only chef elevated to three-star status last week--not unexpected considering the 47-year-old Alsatian chef (who mixes beer with ice cream) is highly rated by rival guidebook Gault-Millau.
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