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Strategic Air Command

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NEWS
May 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The Strategic Air Command has scheduled its annual Global Shield exercise, which simulates flights during wartime conditions, for June 10-19, the Pentagon announced Friday. The exercise involves bomber and missile wings of the command throughout the United States.
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SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Bill Warner, who holds the world speed record (311 mph) for a conventional motorcycle, died Sunday after losing control and zooming off a runway while trying to break his record at Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. Warner, 44, of Wimauma, Fla., was clocked at 285 mph before he lost control. Warner was conscious and talking after the crash, but he died about an hour and 15 minutes later at a hospital in Caribou. "No one will touch Bill's achievements or be the type of racer he was. He was a personal friend and the land-racing community is less for his loss," Tim Kelly , race director of the Loring Timing Assn.
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NEWS
October 2, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Curtis Emerson LeMay, the tough bomber general who directed the smashing of German and Japanese cities during World War II and then built the Strategic Air Command into a powerful nuclear strike force, died Monday of a heart attack. He was 83. The four-star general relayed President Harry S. Truman's orders to drop nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war, despite his later-expressed belief that Japan could have been defeated with conventional incendiary bombs.
NEWS
April 6, 1996
David A. Odell, 72, retired Air Force officer who officially turned over American command to the South Vietnamese in 1973. Odell flew 53 combat missions during the Vietnam War and was commander of the 377th Air Base Wing in Saigon. He earned international attention in March 1973 when he became the last U.S. officer to relinquish his post, turning over command of the Tan Son Nhut Air Base to his South Vietnamese counterparts.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the Persian Gulf War, the Strategic Air Command is stepping up efforts to transform itself from the guardian of the nation's nuclear deterrent to the spearhead of its long-range conventional bomber strike force. At Ellsworth Air Force Base, under the roar of bombers once trained almost exclusively for nuclear war, the service is building the engine of this transformation, a bomber pilot's dream called the Strategic Warfare Center.
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan has named Gen. Larry Welch to succeed Gen. Bennie Davis as head of the Strategic Air Command, the Pentagon announced Wednesday. Welch, 51, is now Air Force vice chief of staff. Davis, 56, is retiring.
NEWS
December 6, 1988
A B-52 bomber crashed on a runway at K.I. Sawyer Air Force Base near Marquette, Mich., but all eight crew members apparently survived, said Lt. Naomi Siegal, a spokeswoman at the Strategic Air Command installation. She said she didn't know if the aircraft was carrying nuclear weapons when it crashed, but added that the crash occurred during a training mission.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT
"Strategic Air Command," a bit of Cold War propaganda about as circumspect as an above-ground nuclear test, is still worth seeing if you get a kick out of aviation or quaint period pieces. James Stewart pulls on his trademark aw-shucks persona as he plays a pro baseball player and World War II pilot called back into the service to fly the huge cigar-like B-36 bomber for SAC. Like many flying pictures, the action doesn't truly get off the ground until the star does.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT
"Strategic Air Command," a bit of Cold War propaganda about as circumspect as an above-ground nuclear test, is still worth seeing if you get a kick out of aviation or quaint period pieces. James Stewart pulls on his trademark aw-shucks persona as he plays a pro baseball player and World War II pilot called back into the service to fly the huge cigar-like B-36 bomber for SAC. Like many flying pictures, the action doesn't truly get off the ground until the star does.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1992 | Associated Press
It has no view. But for $250,000 you can get your own 44,000-square-foot, climate-controlled, three-story atomic bomb-proof Cold War bunker, complete with glassed-in command theater. "It's something of a white elephant," real estate agent Esta Busi said. But she has had a few inquiries for a former Strategic Air Command bunker underneath a mountain in this college town. "It's the only one (for sale) in the U.S.A.," reads the advertisement. "$250,000, a wild imagination . . . and it's yours."
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force, bidding farewell to an era, on Monday dismantled one of its most colorful and controversial Cold War commands and christened a successor designed for a world of Persian Gulf-style conflicts. Under rainy skies, the Strategic Air Command laid down its organizational shield in a cavernous hangar thundering with the sound of martial music.
NEWS
September 30, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a barbed-wire fence, maintenance workers were busy Sunday removing nuclear bombs from B-52s. For the first time in 40 years, the planes would sit with their bellies empty. The "alert" facility here, home base for the men and women who were poised for war on a moment's notice, was a ghost town Sunday. Nearly everyone had gone home. "It's kinda like winning the war," said Capt. Bruce Adams, a B-52 bomber commander who has served eight years at Fairchild, intermittently on alert.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. forces operating strategic bombers and some ballistic missiles were ordered Saturday to "stand down" in the first moves to implement President Bush's dramatic nuclear-arms-reduction package. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, acting on the President's orders, directed the crews of 280 U.S. strategic bombers and 450 Minuteman II missiles to relax the hair-trigger alerts they have maintained for more than 30 years.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the Persian Gulf War, the Strategic Air Command is stepping up efforts to transform itself from the guardian of the nation's nuclear deterrent to the spearhead of its long-range conventional bomber strike force. At Ellsworth Air Force Base, under the roar of bombers once trained almost exclusively for nuclear war, the service is building the engine of this transformation, a bomber pilot's dream called the Strategic Warfare Center.
OPINION
March 2, 1986
1986 is just two months old, and already two notorious dictators--Jean-Claude Duvalier of Haiti and Ferdinand Marcos--have been sent packing by their outraged subjects. Could this be a trend? Just to keep the ball rolling, I suggest that the Reagan Administration declare March "National Dictator's Month." During this time, any dictator who feels at all insecure about his tenure would be free to leave his country, no questions asked. I also propose that the Air Force scramble a special formation of airplanes--a la the Strategic Air Command--and keep them flying 24 hours a day, ready at a moment's notice to pick up these rejected rulers.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Curtis Emerson LeMay, the tough bomber general who directed the smashing of German and Japanese cities during World War II and then built the Strategic Air Command into a powerful nuclear strike force, died Monday of a heart attack. He was 83. The four-star general relayed President Harry S. Truman's orders to drop nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war, despite his later-expressed belief that Japan could have been defeated with conventional incendiary bombs.
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