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Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty

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NEWS
June 4, 1986
Soviet Ambassador to Britain Leonid M. Zamyatin said Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev still wants a second superpower summit that "strengthens international security, creates trust and leads to curbing of the arms race." He told a London news conference that a second summit between Gorbachev and President Reagan could reach agreements on a number of critical issues. The Soviet news media said the apparent U.S.
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NEWS
January 27, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate finally ratified the second U.S.-Russian Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty on Friday, ending a five-month delaying action by conservative Republicans that had threatened Russian approval of the historic accord. The vote was an overwhelming 87 to 4. California Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, both Democrats, voted with the majority to ratify the treaty.
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NEWS
January 21, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is asking leaders of the former Soviet Union to explain the test firings of at least one and probably two intercontinental missiles last month in apparent violation of the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, officials said Monday.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced Friday that he is ready to sign a treaty with the United States to slash the nuclear arsenals of the two nations by more than two-thirds, and proposed doing so at a meeting with President Bush in Alaska next month. Yeltsin's unexpected declaration caused consternation in Washington, where American officials said they thought there was still some hard bargaining to do before an agreement could be signed.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The White House and Congress reached agreement Tuesday on several key arms control issues, thus avoiding a veto fight during the forthcoming U.S.-Soviet summit. Under terms of the deal, written into the $296-billion defense spending bill for the current fiscal year, the Administration agreed to limit testing of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense system, known as "Star Wars."
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON and DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writers
The Democratic-controlled House, bolstering a similar stand that it took two weeks ago, moved Wednesday to force the Reagan Administration to abide by the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty with the Soviet Union. Voting 245 to 181, largely along partisan lines, the House added an amendment to the 1988 defense authorization bill that would require the Administration to get back under the limits placed on warhead launchers by the unratified treaty, known as SALT II.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The House, expressing strong dissatisfaction with President Reagan's approach to arms control, early today approved a $9-billion emergency spending bill that would force Reagan to seek a comprehensive nuclear test ban and to abide by the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty. The measure, which passed 208-178, reflects a growing impatience in Congress with the slow pace of U.S.-Soviet arms talks.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Under intense pressure from Democrats, Senate Republicans on Friday abandoned their four-month filibuster against a $303-billion defense spending bill that would ban testing of President Reagan's "Star Wars" missile defense system. By a 79-4 vote, the Senate agreed to begin debating the measure, which would fund the Pentagon for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1. It was a tacit admission by the GOP minority that it could not win a scheduled showdown cloture vote Tuesday.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A senior Foreign Ministry official confirmed Tuesday that the Soviet Union is deploying a new, mobile SS-24 missile but denied that it violates limits set in the terms of the 1979 strategic arms limitation treaty. Viktor P. Karpov, head of the ministry's arms control and disarmament department, said the SS-24s, which are being mounted on railroad cars, are replacing stationary, silo-launched intercontinental ballistic missiles.
NEWS
June 1, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's apparent decision to abandon the second strategic arms limitation accord is expected to provoke an uproar in Congress this week, with many members offering legislation to force the Administration to continue to abide by the unratified 1979 treaty.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after the Soviet Union's collapse, the Bush Administration believes that a deal is finally in sight to put the former superpower's giant nuclear arsenal under firm control of a single government--Boris N. Yeltsin's Russia. But every time agreement appears within reach, a last-minute problem arises.
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is asking leaders of the former Soviet Union to explain the test firings of at least one and probably two intercontinental missiles last month in apparent violation of the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, officials said Monday.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh failed Thursday to settle three nagging disputes over arms control that are blocking an early summit meeting in Moscow. With Bessmertnykh at his side in the garden of the U.S.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will hold a summit meeting early next year in Moscow, where they expect to sign a long-awaited strategic arms reduction treaty, U.S. and Soviet officials announced Tuesday. The START accord, the subject of intense negotiations since 1982, will eliminate fully one-third of the two nuclear superpowers' long-range weapons.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first signs of a break in the East-West impasse on reducing conventional forces in Europe have come in "constructive responses" by Soviet arms negotiator Viktor P. Karpov to earlier U.S. suggestions, State Department officials said Tuesday. The progress toward eliminating obstacles to an agreement in the so-called CFE talks, coming on the eve of Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | Times Wire Services
Here are some main points of disagreement in U.S.-Soviet arms control negotiations, one of the issues to be discussed at the superpower summit that begins May 30. Strategic Arms Reduction Talks: The two sides disagree on range limits for cruise missiles deployed on aircraft and naval forces. The U.S. is resisting limits on future deployments of sea-launched cruise missiles. Also disputed are limits on mobile land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles and anti-cheating measures.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The White House and Congress reached agreement Tuesday on several key arms control issues, thus avoiding a veto fight during the forthcoming U.S.-Soviet summit. Under terms of the deal, written into the $296-billion defense spending bill for the current fiscal year, the Administration agreed to limit testing of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense system, known as "Star Wars."
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Under intense pressure from Democrats, Senate Republicans on Friday abandoned their four-month filibuster against a $303-billion defense spending bill that would ban testing of President Reagan's "Star Wars" missile defense system. By a 79-4 vote, the Senate agreed to begin debating the measure, which would fund the Pentagon for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1. It was a tacit admission by the GOP minority that it could not win a scheduled showdown cloture vote Tuesday.
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