Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStrategic Arms Reduction Talks
IN THE NEWS

Strategic Arms Reduction Talks

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1988
Record states that the Soviets understand that it is harder to hit a moving target than a stationary one. In his eagerness to hang on to as many land-based missiles as possible, Record seems to have forgotten that there are thousands of mobile sea- and air-based missiles in the U.S. arsenals. The Soviets are doubtless aware of this. The real question is whether the United States and the world are safer with larger or smaller nuclear arsenals. Since nuclear weapons are with us for the foreseeable future, the optimal nuclear arsenal is the smallest that will deter war. The nuclear arsenals of both the 1950s and the 1980s have accomplished this goal, and the arsenals of the 1950s were much smaller.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Ukrainian Parliament ratified the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty known as START-I on Thursday--with so many "ifs" and "buts" as to render it ineffective. Lawmakers voted 254 to 9 to limit the treaty's scope to about one-third of the nuclear missiles on Ukrainian soil and set conditions that would delay the dismantling of even those weapons well into the next century.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From Times wire services
U.S.-Soviet talks aimed at halving their strategic nuclear arsenals resumed today after a seven-month break with a meeting of the two sides' new chief negotiators. The Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START), interrupted to allow President Bush to carry out a defense review after taking office in January, seek a 50% cut in strategic nuclear arms with a range of 3,400 miles or over. The talks began with a first meeting between Richard Burt, the new chief U.S. negotiator, and his Soviet counterpart, Yuri Nazarkin, that lasted more than an hour and 20 minutes.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY and MELISSA HEALY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite growing pressure from the United States to disarm, Ukrainian lawmakers Friday again postponed a vote on ratification of both the START I nuclear arms reduction treaty and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. The Ukrainian government has consistently pledged to ratify both accords promptly. But in a parliamentary mutiny, lawmakers indicated that they want Ukraine to join the nuclear weapons club, at least temporarily.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Republican vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle said the United States should make completion of a treaty on long-range nuclear weapons conditional on Soviet concessions on conventional arms, a position that differs from that of Bush, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
During their summit, President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev laid out this timetable to complete four sets of arms control negotiations: Strategic Arms Reduction Talks, or START: Current goal is to cut long-range offensive nuclear weapons by about 50%: Final proposals from both sides to solve several remaining obstacles to be presented at or before two meetings of Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | Times Wire Services
Here are some main points of disagreement in U.S.-Soviet arms control negotiations, one of the issues to be discussed at the superpower summit that begins May 30. Strategic Arms Reduction Talks: The two sides disagree on range limits for cruise missiles deployed on aircraft and naval forces. The U.S. is resisting limits on future deployments of sea-launched cruise missiles. Also disputed are limits on mobile land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles and anti-cheating measures.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH and WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writers
In one of several modifications to U.S. proposals for a treaty reducing long-range nuclear weapons, President Bush announced Monday that the United States will propose speeding up discussions on verification measures to police compliance with any new accord. Bush held out the possibility of putting some of the verification measures into effect even before U.S. and Soviet negotiators reach agreement at the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks in Geneva. The President plans to outline this and other relatively minor changes in the U.S. bargaining position to congressional leaders today, a senior Administration official said.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
In the first sign of a looming interservice conflict, the Navy has put forward a plan that would give it control over more than four-fifths of the ballistic missile warheads permitted under the strategic arms reduction treaty being negotiated with the Soviet Union, eight Democratic congressmen concerned with military issues charged Thursday. The treaty is intended to reduce the total number of nuclear warheads permitted in the United States and Soviet strategic arsenals, and the legislators, led by House Armed Services Committee Chairman Les Aspin (D-Wis.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A spate of political and economic conflicts between Russia and Ukraine is dragging relations between the two Slavic nations to a new low and dimming prospects for the ratification of the START I nuclear arms treaty. In a week of blunt exchanges, Ukrainian leaders have accused the Kremlin of failing to offer sufficient security assurances in exchange for the fledgling Ukrainian nation's renunciation of its legal right to nuclear weapons.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | Reuters
The Parliament of Belarus, formerly the Soviet state of Byelorussia, on Thursday ratified the START-1 pact. The lawmakers voted 218-1 for the treaty, signed by the United States and the Soviet Union in 1991. About 60 other members of Parliament refused to take part in the vote. The legislature also approved Belarus' adherence to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, underscoring its wish to be a non-nuclear state.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the conclusion of the second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, known as START II, American arms experts are looking beyond the accord to a new, more challenging and potentially more dangerous era in arms control. President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin may be signing a treaty that will cut U.S. and former Soviet nuclear arsenals to their lowest level since the early 1960s.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
This weekend's Russian-U.S. summit, originally set for the Black Sea resort of Sochi, will be in Moscow instead, officials announced Thursday. The White House said that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin had requested the change, citing bad weather in Sochi.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin formally announced Wednesday that they will meet this weekend in a Black Sea resort to sign the most sweeping nuclear arms control agreement ever attempted. But in Russia, the treaty--which calls for a two-thirds reduction in the Russian and American nuclear arsenals--provoked an intense reaction from skeptics, who said they feared that Yeltsin may have given up too much, too fast.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With just 23 days left in the Bush Administration, American and Russian negotiators Tuesday wrapped up the most sweeping arms control agreement ever attempted, requiring the two countries to slash their nuclear arsenals by more than two-thirds in the next 10 years. Secretary of State Lawrence S.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered his foreign and defense ministers to fly to Geneva today to try to remove the last sticking points with the United States on the most ambitious disarmament treaty in history, a Russian spokesman said. With the final days ticking off in the Bush Administration, officials in Moscow said a summit could still occur in early January but that Russia and the United States must close a deal on the arms pact first.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush has launched a last-ditch effort to complete the unfinished U.S.-Russian strategic arms reduction pact before the end of his Administration, and he telephoned Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin this week to press the issue personally, officials said Thursday. Yeltsin responded warmly that he also wants to sign a finished treaty before Bush leaves office, the officials said. "Yeltsin said, 'I'd like to sign it,' " a senior official said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|