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Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty

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WORLD
December 5, 2009 | By Paul Richter
The Obama administration and the Kremlin agreed Friday to continue the provisions of their keystone nuclear arms control treaty after its expiration today while they try to negotiate a follow-on agreement. The two governments issued a statement saying that, because of their desire for stability, "we express our commitment, as a matter of principle, to continue to work together in the spirit of the START treaty following its expiration." The governments cited a "firm intention" to approve a new treaty at the earliest possible date.
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WORLD
March 26, 2010 | By Paul Richter
President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev reached final agreement Friday on a nuclear arms treaty that would cut the nuclear arsenals of the onetime rivals to the lowest levels since the 1960s. With a morning phone call, the two leaders settled the final details of an eight-month negotiation, and they are to meet April 8 in Prague, Czech Republic, to sign the pact, which replaces the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty of 1991. Announcing the accord at the White House, Obama acknowledged that the talks, which were slowed by differences over the sensitive issues of verification and missile defense, were tough.
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NEWS
July 12, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh made "meaningful and substantial" proposals on two of the three issues blocking a strategic arms reduction treaty Thursday, nudging the superpowers a bit closer to a July summit meeting, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said. With Bessmertnykh at his side, Baker said Moscow's new compromise offers will be studied by U.S. arms control experts overnight in preparation for a resumption of his meeting with the Soviet foreign minister today.
WORLD
December 5, 2009 | By Paul Richter
The Obama administration and the Kremlin agreed Friday to continue the provisions of their keystone nuclear arms control treaty after its expiration today while they try to negotiate a follow-on agreement. The two governments issued a statement saying that, because of their desire for stability, "we express our commitment, as a matter of principle, to continue to work together in the spirit of the START treaty following its expiration." The governments cited a "firm intention" to approve a new treaty at the earliest possible date.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved a $26.4-billion foreign aid bill Thursday that includes $10 billion in loan guarantees for Israel and $417 million in aid to the countries that make up the former Soviet Union. The measure passed, 87 to 12, on a day when senators also ratified the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The foreign aid bill now goes to a joint conference committee to iron out differences between the House and Senate versions.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced Friday that he is ready to sign a treaty with the United States to slash the nuclear arsenals of the two nations by more than two-thirds, and proposed doing so at a meeting with President Bush in Alaska next month. Yeltsin's unexpected declaration caused consternation in Washington, where American officials said they thought there was still some hard bargaining to do before an agreement could be signed.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When negotiations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START, began in 1982, the two superpowers stared each other down with arsenals of long-range nuclear weapons that totaled roughly 8,500 Soviet warheads and 9,000 American units. In those chilly days of nuclear rivalry, Dmitri F. Ustinov, the Soviet defense minister at the time, marked the occasion by charging that Washington was aiming to "attain military superiority over the Soviet Union."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1988 | JACK MENDELSOHN, Jack Mendelsohn, a former member of the U.S. SALT II and START delegations, is deputy director of the Arms Control Assn.
On the eve of President Reagan's visit to Moscow last spring, the slim possibility that he might conclude a strategic arms reduction treaty with the Soviets evoked strong criticism and stern warnings to "go slow" in the negotiations. Although the critics overestimated the likelihood of reaching an accord at the summit, the concerns of people like Sen. Robert Byrd, Sen. Dan Quayle, Rep.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shutdown of the U.S. nuclear reprocessing plant at Rocky Flats, Colo., for safety reasons late last year is proving to be a major snag in working out a joint U.S.-Soviet accord to ban further production of fissionable materials such as uranium and plutonium. Pentagon officials say that unless the Rocky Flats facility can be reopened soon, the United States will be unable to reprocess enough weapons-grade materials from used warheads to meet current demands for new or replacement missiles.
WORLD
March 25, 2010 | By Paul Richter
American and Russian officials have reached a deal to slash their nuclear arsenals after eight months of unexpectedly tough negotiations, sources close to the talks said Wednesday. President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, who ordered the negotiations begun last July, still must sign off on details of the agreement, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said. The two leaders are expected to sign a treaty next month in Prague, Czech Republic. The accord will replace the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty of 1991, and will set limits on the number of long-range deployed nuclear warheads, as well as the number of nuclear-capable bombers and missiles.
WORLD
May 20, 2009 | Associated Press
Russian and U.S. negotiators sat down for difficult nuclear arms control talks Tuesday amid hopes that warming relations could help them reach an agreement seen as essential for global stability. The negotiating teams gathered at a Foreign Ministry mansion for two days of talks to replace the 1991 Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. START I expires Dec. 5, threatening to end formal controls on the size of the world's biggest nuclear arsenals.
WORLD
April 2, 2009 | Christi Parsons and Megan K. Stack
President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev agreed Wednesday to open negotiations on a treaty that could slash their nuclear arsenals by a third, part of what they described as a step "to move beyond Cold War mentalities" in relations between Washington and Moscow. The agreement to undertake significant arms control talks emerged from the first face-to-face meeting between the two leaders, and included a promise by Obama to visit the Russian capital this summer to pursue the talks.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced Friday that he is ready to sign a treaty with the United States to slash the nuclear arsenals of the two nations by more than two-thirds, and proposed doing so at a meeting with President Bush in Alaska next month. Yeltsin's unexpected declaration caused consternation in Washington, where American officials said they thought there was still some hard bargaining to do before an agreement could be signed.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty--which would cut nuclear weapons and which once was hailed by President Bush as a major achievement of his Administration's diplomacy--is unlikely to be completed by the time Bush leaves office because of Russian misgivings and American uncertainty, officials said this week. Russia has asked for several changes in the basic framework for a new agreement that Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced in June.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved a $26.4-billion foreign aid bill Thursday that includes $10 billion in loan guarantees for Israel and $417 million in aid to the countries that make up the former Soviet Union. The measure passed, 87 to 12, on a day when senators also ratified the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The foreign aid bill now goes to a joint conference committee to iron out differences between the House and Senate versions.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed a historic and long-awaited treaty cutting their nations' nuclear arsenals Wednesday, but they neared the end of their two-day summit meeting here still far apart on the future of arms control. With the new treaty, the two countries "reverse a half-century of steadily growing strategic arsenals," Bush said. "More than that, we take a significant step forward in dispelling a half-century of mistrust."
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed a historic and long-awaited treaty cutting their nations' nuclear arsenals Wednesday, but they neared the end of their two-day summit meeting here still far apart on the future of arms control. With the new treaty, the two countries "reverse a half-century of steadily growing strategic arsenals," Bush said. "More than that, we take a significant step forward in dispelling a half-century of mistrust."
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty--which would cut nuclear weapons and which once was hailed by President Bush as a major achievement of his Administration's diplomacy--is unlikely to be completed by the time Bush leaves office because of Russian misgivings and American uncertainty, officials said this week. Russia has asked for several changes in the basic framework for a new agreement that Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced in June.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When negotiations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START, began in 1982, the two superpowers stared each other down with arsenals of long-range nuclear weapons that totaled roughly 8,500 Soviet warheads and 9,000 American units. In those chilly days of nuclear rivalry, Dmitri F. Ustinov, the Soviet defense minister at the time, marked the occasion by charging that Washington was aiming to "attain military superiority over the Soviet Union."
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