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Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty Ii

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NEWS
May 30, 1998 | Associated Press
Russia would have ratified the START II agreement on nuclear arms reduction if NATO had not expanded into Eastern Europe, the speaker of the Russian parliament said Friday. Hard-liners in the lower house, the Duma, have blocked ratification, arguing that it will hurt Russia's national security and will be too expensive. The treaty, signed by both countries in 1993, was ratified by the U.S. Senate in 1996.
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NEWS
May 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
President-elect Vladimir V. Putin signed the START II treaty Thursday, affirming the Russian parliament's approval of the plan to trim the nuclear arsenals of Russia and the United States, the presidential press service said. The treaty obligates Russia and the U.S. to slash nuclear stockpiles to 3,000 to 3,500 warheads each. It was approved last month by both chambers of parliament, ending seven years of deadlock.
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NEWS
April 14, 1998 | Associated Press
After submitting an amended version of the START II arms control treaty to Russia's parliament Monday, President Boris N. Yeltsin finally appeared likely to see the 5-year-old pact ratified. The treaty, signed by Yeltsin and President Bush in 1993, would halve the strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and Russia. The U.S. Senate ratified it in 1996, but the Duma, the lower house of Russia's parliament, so far has refused to approve it.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of the mood in Russia to sweep away the Yeltsin era and push ahead with change, the upper house of parliament voted Wednesday to dismiss the country's suspended prosecutor general and to ratify the START II treaty. Coming after an appeal by President-elect Vladimir V. Putin to dismiss Yuri I. Skuratov, the vote underscored Putin's ability to push his changes through the lower and upper chambers of the parliament.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Thursday appealed to Russian lawmakers to approve the sweeping START II arms reduction treaty, but his audience reacted with suspicion and distrust of U.S. intentions, particularly Washington's support for NATO expansion. Perry appeared before the state Duma, or lower house of parliament, just before President Boris N. Yeltsin announced the ouster of security chief Alexander I.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | Associated Press
Ignoring Administration warnings that it is inciting a new arms race, the Senate held fast Thursday to plans to erect a missile defense system, unilaterally altering a 1972 treaty. By a 51-49 vote, the Senate rejected a Democrat-led effort to remove language in a 1996 defense spending bill that fundamentally changes the U.S. stance toward the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty that restricts U.S. and Russian missile defenses. The Administration has threatened to veto the measure.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the presidents of America and Russia raised champagne toasts this week in Moscow to the boldest U.S.-Russian nuclear arms reduction pact ever, they omitted some important people from the guest list: the Ukrainians. The fate of the START II treaty signed Sunday and the reduction of superpower arsenals as a whole now lie in the hands of elected officials in this hilly capital on the Dnieper River. In large part, Ukrainians say, the problem is financial.
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three generations of Russians who survived the Cold War paused on this frigid Sunday to recall their fears of instant annihilation and express relief at the biggest arms reduction treaty ever between the world's supreme nuclear powers. "It is great that they have agreed to exterminate those terrible nukes," Helena V. Babundina, an 18-year-old seamstress, exclaimed after Presidents Bush and Boris N. Yeltsin signed the second Strategic Arms Reduction Talks pact in the Kremlin.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, intent on leaving the White House in a flourish of statesmanship, came to frigid Moscow on Saturday to sign a nuclear disarmament treaty so unprecedented in scope that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin called it "our joint gift to the peoples of the Earth." "The two powers who once divided the world have now come together to make it a better and a safer place," Bush, who leaves office in 17 days, said after arriving from Somalia, eight hours away and 72 degrees warmer.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
President-elect Vladimir V. Putin signed the START II treaty Thursday, affirming the Russian parliament's approval of the plan to trim the nuclear arsenals of Russia and the United States, the presidential press service said. The treaty obligates Russia and the U.S. to slash nuclear stockpiles to 3,000 to 3,500 warheads each. It was approved last month by both chambers of parliament, ending seven years of deadlock.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After more than seven years of discord and delay, Russia's lower house of parliament signaled a new era in U.S.-Russian relations Friday by ratifying the landmark START II arms control treaty. The treaty, which was ratified by the U.S. Senate in 1996, is the most ambitious and extensive arms control agreement between the two nuclear states, requiring each to roughly halve their arsenals by 2007.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Tuesday that it will make ratification of a global treaty banning nuclear testing a priority for 1999, a move that launches President Clinton on a collision course with key Republicans already sworn in as jurors in his Senate impeachment trial. Speaking at an international conference on nonproliferation here, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said Clinton will press the Senate to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tacitly admitting failure in his efforts to bluff the Russian parliament into ratifying a key arms control agreement, President Clinton announced Monday that he will visit Moscow in early September for a summit with President Boris N. Yeltsin. The decision restores the normal schedule for U.S.-Russian summits, lifting Clinton's previous declaration that he would travel to Moscow only after the Russian Duma, or lower house of parliament, ratified the stalled START II treaty.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's refusal to visit Russia until lawmakers here ratify the START II disarmament treaty appears to be backfiring, because it deprives Kremlin reformers of meaningful contact with U.S. leaders and empowers Communist opponents to frustrate relations between the two countries.
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | Associated Press
Russia would have ratified the START II agreement on nuclear arms reduction if NATO had not expanded into Eastern Europe, the speaker of the Russian parliament said Friday. Hard-liners in the lower house, the Duma, have blocked ratification, arguing that it will hurt Russia's national security and will be too expensive. The treaty, signed by both countries in 1993, was ratified by the U.S. Senate in 1996.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | Associated Press
After submitting an amended version of the START II arms control treaty to Russia's parliament Monday, President Boris N. Yeltsin finally appeared likely to see the 5-year-old pact ratified. The treaty, signed by Yeltsin and President Bush in 1993, would halve the strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and Russia. The U.S. Senate ratified it in 1996, but the Duma, the lower house of Russia's parliament, so far has refused to approve it.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After more than seven years of discord and delay, Russia's lower house of parliament signaled a new era in U.S.-Russian relations Friday by ratifying the landmark START II arms control treaty. The treaty, which was ratified by the U.S. Senate in 1996, is the most ambitious and extensive arms control agreement between the two nuclear states, requiring each to roughly halve their arsenals by 2007.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Tuesday that it will make ratification of a global treaty banning nuclear testing a priority for 1999, a move that launches President Clinton on a collision course with key Republicans already sworn in as jurors in his Senate impeachment trial. Speaking at an international conference on nonproliferation here, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said Clinton will press the Senate to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Thursday appealed to Russian lawmakers to approve the sweeping START II arms reduction treaty, but his audience reacted with suspicion and distrust of U.S. intentions, particularly Washington's support for NATO expansion. Perry appeared before the state Duma, or lower house of parliament, just before President Boris N. Yeltsin announced the ouster of security chief Alexander I.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | Associated Press
Ignoring Administration warnings that it is inciting a new arms race, the Senate held fast Thursday to plans to erect a missile defense system, unilaterally altering a 1972 treaty. By a 51-49 vote, the Senate rejected a Democrat-led effort to remove language in a 1996 defense spending bill that fundamentally changes the U.S. stance toward the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty that restricts U.S. and Russian missile defenses. The Administration has threatened to veto the measure.
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