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NEWS
December 27, 1987 | NICOLAS B. TATRO, Associated Press
Israel's defense industry, which became a major exporter in the past decade, now is handing out pink slips instead of raking in greenbacks. Political shifts, domestic budget cuts and increased competition for a shrinking world market have been blamed for laying off nearly 10,000 of the industry's 65,000 workers. Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin said in an interview that each of the main state-owned arms makers lost tens of millions of dollars in the last year.
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WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Supporters of Russian President Vladimir Putin expect to savor victory as residents of Crimea vote Sunday on splitting from Ukraine. But Western officials and analysts increasingly feel that in the long run, Russians will come to see their nation's military and political move into Crimea as a mistake. Two weeks after Russian forces entered the peninsula en masse, Russia's stock market and economic data have started to signal trouble - the start of what could become a lasting pullback by foreign investors.
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WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, Paul Richter and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration on Friday condemned Russia's delivery of advanced antiship missiles to Syria and its buildup of warships in the eastern Mediterranean, arguing that the Kremlin's escalating support for its longtime ally in Damascus could prolong the civil war. Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Russia's military moves would "embolden" Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces and extend the suffering in...
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Paul Richter
JAKARTA, Indonesia - U.S. diplomats preparing for a new round of nuclear negotiations with Iran this week are pondering an important question: How can they make the Iranians feel like the winners? The U.S. team and diplomats from five other nations sit down with Iran on Tuesday in Vienna to begin bargaining on what could be a historic agreement to prevent the Islamic Republic from gaining a bomb-making capability. An atmosphere of high anticipation surrounds the talks, which are expected to continue for six months to a year, and possibly longer.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan will send a delegation to Pakistan soon in an attempt to open channels with the Taliban toward a peace deal, officials said Wednesday. Afghan President Hamid Karzai said in a statement that he and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif agreed to the initiative in London this week as part of a three-way conclave with British Prime Minister David Cameron aimed at bolstering stability in the volatile South Asia region. Afghanistan's High Peace Council, a group formed by Karzai in 2010 to pursue a political settlement with the Taliban, will send a delegation to meet with former deputy Taliban leader Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, the president's office said.
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Paul Richter
JAKARTA, Indonesia - U.S. diplomats preparing for a new round of nuclear negotiations with Iran this week are pondering an important question: How can they make the Iranians feel like the winners? The U.S. team and diplomats from five other nations sit down with Iran on Tuesday in Vienna to begin bargaining on what could be a historic agreement to prevent the Islamic Republic from gaining a bomb-making capability. An atmosphere of high anticipation surrounds the talks, which are expected to continue for six months to a year, and possibly longer.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
MARAAT NUMAN, Syria - Each morning, after saluting the Syrian flag and before the warplanes take off, soldiers at army bases across Syria are given political orientation. During the lectures, conscripts and career officers alike are repeatedly told that opposition forces are fueled by sectarian hatred and want to tear the country apart. The message - of a war waged by Sunni Muslims against Syria's Alawite and Shiite minorities - is well understood. To Syrian soldiers, "It has essentially become sectarian; the Sunnis fight out of fear and the Alawites fight out of conviction," said Muhammad Zinedden, a Sunni conscript who defected in February from the 17th Engineering Regiment in Raqqa province.
WORLD
April 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - North Korea is sometimes mocked as the mouse that roared, one of the poorest countries in the world threatening two economic and military giants, the United States and South Korea. But under Kim Jong Il and now his 30-year-old son, Kim Jong Un, North Korea has proved itself the master at playing a poor hand. Indeed, it uses weakness to its advantage. Like a barefoot man who doesn't fear the man with shoes, North Korea behaves like it has nothing to lose. PHOTOS: Following Kim Jong Un South Korea has twice the population and 40 times the economic might of North Korea.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Supporters of Russian President Vladimir Putin expect to savor victory as residents of Crimea vote Sunday on splitting from Ukraine. But Western officials and analysts increasingly feel that in the long run, Russians will come to see their nation's military and political move into Crimea as a mistake. Two weeks after Russian forces entered the peninsula en masse, Russia's stock market and economic data have started to signal trouble - the start of what could become a lasting pullback by foreign investors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1988 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine writes a column for The Times
The traditional fate of studies by blue-ribbon presidential commissions is to be published, debated pro and con for a season--then gradually forgotten. That may happen to the report issued earlier this month by the Commission on Long-Term Strategy, which was appointed by the Reagan Administration 15 months ago to divine what combination of weapons and policies are needed to see us safely through the next 20 years.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan will send a delegation to Pakistan soon in an attempt to open channels with the Taliban toward a peace deal, officials said Wednesday. Afghan President Hamid Karzai said in a statement that he and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif agreed to the initiative in London this week as part of a three-way conclave with British Prime Minister David Cameron aimed at bolstering stability in the volatile South Asia region. Afghanistan's High Peace Council, a group formed by Karzai in 2010 to pursue a political settlement with the Taliban, will send a delegation to meet with former deputy Taliban leader Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, the president's office said.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
MARAAT NUMAN, Syria - Each morning, after saluting the Syrian flag and before the warplanes take off, soldiers at army bases across Syria are given political orientation. During the lectures, conscripts and career officers alike are repeatedly told that opposition forces are fueled by sectarian hatred and want to tear the country apart. The message - of a war waged by Sunni Muslims against Syria's Alawite and Shiite minorities - is well understood. To Syrian soldiers, "It has essentially become sectarian; the Sunnis fight out of fear and the Alawites fight out of conviction," said Muhammad Zinedden, a Sunni conscript who defected in February from the 17th Engineering Regiment in Raqqa province.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By David S. Cloud, Paul Richter and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration on Friday condemned Russia's delivery of advanced antiship missiles to Syria and its buildup of warships in the eastern Mediterranean, arguing that the Kremlin's escalating support for its longtime ally in Damascus could prolong the civil war. Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Russia's military moves would "embolden" Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces and extend the suffering in...
WORLD
April 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - North Korea is sometimes mocked as the mouse that roared, one of the poorest countries in the world threatening two economic and military giants, the United States and South Korea. But under Kim Jong Il and now his 30-year-old son, Kim Jong Un, North Korea has proved itself the master at playing a poor hand. Indeed, it uses weakness to its advantage. Like a barefoot man who doesn't fear the man with shoes, North Korea behaves like it has nothing to lose. PHOTOS: Following Kim Jong Un South Korea has twice the population and 40 times the economic might of North Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1988 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine writes a column for The Times
The traditional fate of studies by blue-ribbon presidential commissions is to be published, debated pro and con for a season--then gradually forgotten. That may happen to the report issued earlier this month by the Commission on Long-Term Strategy, which was appointed by the Reagan Administration 15 months ago to divine what combination of weapons and policies are needed to see us safely through the next 20 years.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | NICOLAS B. TATRO, Associated Press
Israel's defense industry, which became a major exporter in the past decade, now is handing out pink slips instead of raking in greenbacks. Political shifts, domestic budget cuts and increased competition for a shrinking world market have been blamed for laying off nearly 10,000 of the industry's 65,000 workers. Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin said in an interview that each of the main state-owned arms makers lost tens of millions of dollars in the last year.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, American and South Korean military planners have studied what they sometimes call the Second Korean War. They have played out the war games and the scenarios aren't pretty. "The north's plan has two options to it," explains Paul Godwin of the Defense Department's National War College, an expert on Asian military affairs who has played the role of a North Korean in the war games. "One is to take Seoul quickly and sue for peace.
WORLD
February 25, 2007 | Bob Drogin and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
Although international concern is growing about Iran's nuclear program and its regional ambitions, diplomats here say most U.S. intelligence shared with the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency has proved inaccurate and none has led to significant discoveries inside Iran. The officials said the CIA and other Western spy services had provided sensitive information to the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency at least since 2002, when Iran's long-secret nuclear program was exposed.
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