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WORLD
December 21, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - You find the capos of the drug trade, and you arrest them or kill them. That, in its simplest form, was the idea behind the so-called kingpin strategy that former Mexican President Felipe Calderon pursued with zeal for most of his six-year term. As his administration drew to an end this year, he would often mention, as a point of pride, that his government had taken out two-thirds of Mexico's 37 most wanted criminals. But as new President Enrique Peña Nieto rolled out his crime-fighting strategy this week, his team was explicit about the trouble that "kingpin" had wrought: On Monday, Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said the strategy caused a fragmentation of criminal groups that had made them "more violent and much more dangerous," as they branched out into homicide, extortion, robbery and kidnapping.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
PHOENIX - Inside an industrial building next to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, about a dozen product scouts meet daily to discuss their search for the next Garden Yeti. This is the headquarters for SkyMall, the in-flight catalog that reaches an estimated 600 million travelers a year via the seat pockets of nearly every domestic flight. The yeti is one of the catalog's all-time bestsellers - more than 10,000 statues since the magazine started 24 years ago. Could the next big hit be a foam beach pillow that can conceal two beers?
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OPINION
July 10, 2009
Re "Obama's strategic blind spot," Opinion, July 6 Andrew J. Bacevich paints a relatively clear picture of his wish for a U.S. foreign policy strategy, but he cannot resist revealing a common bias. His barbs directed at George W. Bush and his administration are not relevant to his point. Unfortunately, too, he fails to state what the goal of the strategy is, making it difficult to evaluate the likelihood of success or failure. Taken literally, his commentary would suggest that the only goal is a strategy.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Barbara Demick
SEOUL - As he hops around the Western Pacific this week, President Obama hopes to unite much of Asia around a free-trade deal, updated alliances and a new power balance. But he first must persuade two of America's closest allies to stop squabbling. Jetting from Tokyo to Seoul on Friday morning, his second stop on the trip, Obama was between two nations mired in an old feud. South Koreans are furious over what they perceive as inadequate remorse from Japan over its brutal colonization of their nation from 1910 to 1945 and its use of Korean "comfort women" as sex slaves during World War II. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Korean President Park Geun-hye have traded slights and diplomatic digs for months.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - In 2011, with the government dangling on the edge of default, President Obama and House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) engaged in near daily negotiations. There were regular phone calls, talks and red wine at the White House. There were blowups, makeups and then a deal. Now, two years later, Obama isn't even convening the first White House meeting with congressional leaders until Wednesday evening, more than 40 hours after the deadlock in Congress forced a government shutdown.
OPINION
April 5, 2011 | Jonah Goldberg
Obama's in! In truly unshocking news, Barack Obama emailed supporters Monday to let them know he was running for president again. "We're doing this now because the politics we believe in does not start with expensive TV ads or extravaganzas, but with you -- with people organizing block-by-block, talking to neighbors, co-workers and friends. And that kind of campaign takes time to build. " Don't get him wrong. There will be expensive TV ads and extravaganzas. Oh, yes. After all, what would an Obama campaign be without its outsized, world-historic, bread and circus spectacles?
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Merck & Co., the second-largest drug maker by sales, said Tuesday it will lay off 8,500 employees in a strategy overhaul to revamp its research and development efforts.  That's on top of a previous announcement that the Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based company would lay off 7,500 workers. The combined cuts amount to 20% of the company's global workforce. In a statement, the drug company said the strategy is expected to save $2.5 billion by the end of 2015; 40% of those savings would be realized by the end of next year.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON-- Republican uber-strategist Karl Rove joked about murdering a Missouri Senate candidate who made controversial remarks about rape and revealed his strategy for persuading independent voters to turn against President Obama in a private briefing for top GOPdonors that was infiltrated by a Bloomberg reporter. Rove's remarks, part of a briefing Thursday at the Tampa Club during the Republican National Convention, provided a window into the secretive political operation of the conservative “super PAC” American Crossroads and its sister nonprofit group, Crossroads GPS, both co-founded by the former Bush advisor.
WORLD
September 11, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - In the last two weeks, President Obama has brought the United States to the brink of another military operation, then backed off unexpectedly. He went abroad and tried to rally international partners to join his cause, but returned empty-handed. He launched one of the biggest public relations and lobbying campaigns of his presidency, then aborted the mission. He called the nation to its televisions to make the case for using force, but made the case for more diplomacy. The White House's stop-and-start response to the chemical weapons attack in Syria three weeks ago could at best be described as deftly improvisational and at worst as impulsive and risky.
WORLD
December 25, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
AL SARRAIN, Yemen - The U.S. drone flew over a cluster of mud houses on a ridge and, according to Yemeni officials, locked onto Adnan Qadhi, a mercurial man of many guises, including radical militant, peace mediator, preacher of violence and army general. Villagers said Qadhi climbed out of his utility vehicle the night of Nov. 7 to make a cellphone call shortly before the missile struck. His photo - broad face peering from beneath a tilted red beret, stars on his epaulets - now hangs in a small grocery store in a land where farmers work narrow fields below the villas of politicians, tribal leaders and a former president that rise like fortresses on nearby hilltops.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
The job : Bill Dombrowski is president of the California Retailers Assn., a trade group based in Sacramento that includes most of the country's largest store chains, including 7-Eleven Inc., Safeway Inc., Macy's Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Home Depot Inc. For the last 20 years, he's crafted political and legislative strategies for the association, whose members generate more than $570 billion in annual sales and employ nearly 2.8 million people....
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Juergen Klinsmann hasn't made many missteps in his 2 1/2 years of coach of the U.S. national team. Still it was hard not to question last week's decision to jettison Martin Vasquez, his longtime right-hand man, and replace him with Tab Ramos and former German national team coach Berti Vogts. Sacking your top assistant two months before the World Cup is a little like a presidential candidate dumping his running mate after the convention. So was it an act of panic or prescience? It's too early to tell.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
As the Angels prepared for the 2002 World Series, bench coach Joe Maddon looked at the spray charts and came to a radical conclusion: If the Angels wanted to align their defense based on where Barry Bonds most commonly hit the ball, they should play three infielders and four outfielders. The Angels ultimately decided not to play Bonds that way, although Manager Mike Scioscia said they were "a couple pitches away" from deploying the scheme in certain scenarios. In 2005, Maddon left to manage the Tampa Bay Rays, who have been at the forefront of baseball's shift toward unconventional fielding alignments.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - In an effort to deliver on President Obama's pledge last summer to tackle emissions that drive climate change, the White House announced a strategy to limit releases of methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. The methane strategy, disclosed Friday, is the most recent in a string of climate change initiatives that the White House has unveiled at a rapid pace in recent weeks. It lays the groundwork for regulations that could affect agriculture and the oil, gas and coal industries.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Nabih Bulos and Patrick J. McDonnell
IRBID, Jordan - The Free Syrian Army commander, head of a moderate rebel force fighting just across the border in southern Syria, watched helplessly for months as better-funded Islamist militant groups peeled off half the 2,000 fighters from his brigade. That changed in February when an intelligence operative from a country he refuses to name handed him an envelope full of cash - salaries for his remaining combatants. "It's a good amount of money; I can keep my fighters," the commander said, as scented smoke from his arghileh [water pipe]
SPORTS
March 22, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
The season-opening Daytona 500 was less than an hour old when Barney Visser saw his latest $1-million NASCAR investment literally go up in smoke. Visser owns Furniture Row Racing, which fields one car - the black No. 78 Chevrolet - driven by Martin Truex Jr. in NASCAR's Sprint Cup Series. After weeks of preparation for the Daytona 500 and then being forced to use a backup car because of a crash in qualifying, the team saw the engine on Truex's car blow up only 31 laps into NASCAR's crown-jewel event last month.
OPINION
April 13, 2006
On reading the April 11 article about Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's backing the greenhouse gas strategy, I was struck with how pleased I was and startled at my own response because I am a Democrat and have voted that way all my life. However, that does not preclude my recognizing that we are all in this together, that global warming affects each of us. If a Republican governor is taking a good political position that will show the rest of the country that we cannot wait for the Bush administration to act, I want him to know that I am totally supportive.
WORLD
March 5, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
  At a previous high-profile summit between a U.S. president and an Israeli prime minister, an exasperated Bill Clinton marveled at what he viewed as his counterpart's arrogance in schooling him about the Mideast conflict. According to one aide, Clinton asked after the meeting: Just who is the superpower? The Israeli leader at the time was - and again is - Benjamin Netanyahu. At home, Netanyahu is seen as politically cautious, risk-averse and "squeezable" when it comes to his positions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
From Harry Potter to Bella Swan to Katniss Everdeen, the hottest phenomenon in publishing these days is young adult fiction about risk takers who dare to go their own way. So it's more than a little ironic, if predictable, that films made from these books are completely risk aversive. Why rock the boat and jeopardize a potentially huge franchise if you don't really have to? "Divergent" is the latest, most snug-fitting version of that trend. As directed by Neil Burger ("The Illusionist," "Limitless")
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Republican Party's congressional campaign wing said Tuesday that a hotly contested special election in Florida is serving as a laboratory for testing messages and tactics for the 2014 midterm races. During a news conference, Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) said the National Republican Congressional Committee is working to improve the breadth and depth of its voter database, and that the committee will keep tabs on how its digital strategy plays out in Florida.
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