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NEWS
August 16, 1991 | MONA GABLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nancy Drew was blond and pretty, also smart and independent--a teen-ager who had her own car and solved mysteries with her girlfriends, George and Bess, and her boyfriend, Ned Nickerson. She had a perfect dad, the distinguished attorney Carson Drew, who discussed his cases with her, encouraged her and never interfered. As for Frank and Joe--the Hardy Boys--they were high school guys who loved baseball and motorcycles. They were loyal and respectful and they liked their parents.
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NEWS
August 16, 1991 | MONA GABLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nancy Drew was blond and pretty, also smart and independent--a teen-ager who had her own car and solved mysteries with her girlfriends, George and Bess, and her boyfriend, Ned Nickerson. She had a perfect dad, the distinguished attorney Carson Drew, who discussed his cases with her, encouraged her and never interfered. As for Frank and Joe--the Hardy Boys--they were high school guys who loved baseball and motorcycles. They were loyal and respectful and they liked their parents.
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NEWS
August 16, 1991 | MONA GABLE
Mildred Wirt Benson, arguably the person most responsible for Nancy Drew's success, couldn't care less about the hoopla surrounding the reissuing of the early Nancy Drew books. In a phone interview, Benson, who lives in Ohio, said she wrote the first Drew mysteries 60 years ago to pay the bills. "It is just part of my life," says Benson, 86, who has been a reporter at the Toledo Blade for four decades. "I'm still working. I have a column called 'On the Go.' I write about people.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2007 | Susan King
Nancy Drew has amazing legs, especially for someone 77 years old. The plucky teen heroine was first introduced to readers in 1930 in "The Secret of the Old Clock." Created and outlined by Edward Stratemeyer, founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, the first Nancy Drew novels were written by Mildred A. Wirt Benson and edited by Stratemeyer's daughter Harriet. Edward Stratemeyer died the same year "Clock" was published.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN
The two most enduring series books are the Hardy Boys (launched in 1927) and Nancy Drew (1930). Simon & Schuster, which bought the rights to the two series from the Stratemeyer Syndicate in 1984, now publishes three separate Nancy Drew series and two Hardy Boys series under its Archway Paperbacks and Minstrel Books imprints. The new Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew adventures are aimed at 8- to 14-year-old readers.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no mystery why those Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys adventures currently on bookstore shelves look suspiciously like your grandparents' mysteries. The volumes from Massachusetts-based Applewood Books are exact replicas of the originals. "Back Again . . . Just as You Remember" proclaim the jacket blurbs, together with this warning: "There is another, less expensive edition available in bookstores--but beware, it is an updated, rewritten and condensed version."
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a child in the 1950s, Vicki Broadhurst of Newport Beach first discovered Nancy Drew. She and her girlfriends devoured every volume in the series starring the resourceful teen-age sleuth who tooled around River Heights in a sporty blue roadster. "Between all of us we had just about the whole set," recalls Broadhurst, 46.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vicki Broadhurst of Newport Beach was a child in the 1950s when she discovered Nancy Drew. She and her girlfriends devoured every volume in the series starring the resourceful teen-age sleuth who tooled around River Heights in a sporty blue roadster. "Between all of us we had just about the whole set," recalls Broadhurst, 46.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm so sick of Nancy Drew I could vomit." --Author Mildred Wirt Benson en route to the first Nancy Drew conference in 1993, as quoted in the New York Times Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, original author of the Nancy Drew series of mysteries, which have intrigued and inspired generations of adolescent girls who identified with the spunky heroine, has died. She was 96.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, Lynne Heffley reviews theater for young people in her Daily Calendar column, "Kidbeat."
The Nancy Drew Files, Case 1, Secrets Can Kill and Case 2, Deadly Intent by Carolyn Keene (Archway/Simon & Schuster: $2.50 each). Who protects national security, brings murderers to justice, foils videotape blackmail plots, locates missing rock stars, knocks out thugs with one well-placed karate blow, and still finds time for romance? If you've guessed James Bond, guess again. It's dynamic super-sleuth Nancy Drew, upbeat, upscale and now, considerably updated.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spunky Nancy Drew might faint with fright--golden locks flying, high heels twisting, pearls askew--if she knew what was to befall her flapper girl self: The '90s Nancy is a university journalism major who drives a Mustang, colors her hair and thinks way too much about boys. "They have changed Nancy Drew in a frightening way," sniffed Beth Caswell, founder of the Nancy Drew Detective Club, "taking away her manners, her roadster, her white gloves."
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