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SCIENCE
September 24, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Changes in wind direction 15 to 30 miles above Earth's surface can affect mile-deep currents in the North Atlantic by striking an oceanic "Achilles' heel," according to atmospheric scientists. The discovery, published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience , carries implications for the study of Earth's climate and how we predict its change. Scientists have long understood that events in Earth's stratosphere -- that layer of atmosphere that begins 6 miles above Earth's surface and extends another 25 miles in height  -- influences events in the lower troposphere, where weather occurs.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - The $19 billion that Facebook Inc. is paying for a smartphone app, one of the biggest tech deals of all time, made jaws drop even in Silicon Valley, where entrepreneurs tend to have an inflated sense of their own worth. "It's 19 Instagrams," observed serial start-up entrepreneur Adam Rifkin, referring to the $1 billion Facebook paid for the popular photo-sharing app in 2012. But analysts say the purchase of WhatsApp could pay off for Facebook as it takes on Google Inc. and other technology giants in the escalating arms race to be the next big thing in mobile.
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TRAVEL
April 10, 2005
REGARDING Steve Friess' recommendation to avoid the Stratosphere ["Some of It Should Stay in Vegas," March 20]: Yes, the Stratosphere is expensive, and the waits can be excruciatingly long, but it is worth every penny. The views are great. Ear and nose doctors will probably assume that I am nuts, but when I walked on the open-air level -- removing my hearing aids because of the strong wind -- it was absolutely exhilarating. Not just that, but my hearing improved, at least for a while.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | Dennis McLellan
In a day before comedy was laced with irony and studded with mean-spirited barbs, Sid Caesar was more than funny. He was hilariously, outrageously, tear-inducingly, gather-up-the-whole-family-for-this funny . A veteran of the Catskills with an elastic face, a knack for gibberish and a mind that could find comedy gold in the workings of a Bavarian cuckoo clock, Caesar was the king of live television sketch comedy in the 1950s. Some of the best writers - Carl Reiner, Neil Simon and Mel Brooks - vied to work for him. No slouches at comedy themselves, they were dazzled by his genius and, at times, horrified by his temper; he once tore the sink from a hotel bathroom and threatened to throw Brooks out an 18th-story window.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1986
I am upset at the news from the present owner that the landmark "Tail of the Cock" is to be razed so that another shopping mall can be built. Although, as he said, the "Tail" is doing well, the property can bring a higher return, which is a sign of the times. In a Valley landscape already littered with too many office buildings and shopping malls, both mini and otherwise, it would be a desecration to remove one of the last of the restaurants that are not high-tech, noisy or priced into the stratosphere.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Jon Healey
According to David Keith , a physicist at Harvard, it's a fairly straightforward proposition to reduce the rate of warming on earth, and not all that expensive in the grand scheme of things. One possibility: fly a couple of customized corporate jets into the stratosphere every day and dump a lot of sulfur, creating thin clouds that reflect away some of the sunlight. "The hard questions here really aren't technical," Keith said Monday. "They're fundamentally political. " And the political questions about this sort of environmental manipulation, known in science circles as "geoengineering," are doozies.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What a difference a couple of weeks can make. At the beginning of July, QLogic Corp. in Costa Mesa was just bubbling under Wall Street's radar. The company, which makes products that link disk drives and other peripherals to computers, watched its stock price float between the mid-$20s and mid-$30s for much of the year. Then, after a slew of recent deals, the stock jumped from $28.13 on July 8 to a 52-week high of $63.63 last Wednesday. The company's stock closed at $58.25 on Friday.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Kaplan, the eminent physicist with an earthy viewpoint who headed the U.S. National Committee for the International Geophysical Year, died Thursday. Kaplan, who was a pioneer in the chemistry and physics of the stratosphere and a champion of student athletes on the earthbound playing fields of American universities, was 89 and died in Santa Monica after a heart attack.
NEWS
May 10, 2007 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
"THIS is a bonkers kind of night," said Joseph Arthur, right as he started the second half of his show Tuesday at the Roxy with his new band, the Lonely Astronauts. And right he was. That's a good thing, though -- something that's been all too rare in much of rock of late. And that seems to be the point of this latest venture from this former protege of Peter Gabriel known for his introspective, largely solo musical constructions that could at times be distancing.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | from Associated Press
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration came into being on Oct. 1, 1958, a year after the Soviet Union launched the world's first satellite, Sputnik, whose beep-beep-beep alarmed and embarrassed America. Congress gave the new space effort $331 million for the first year of operation. The spending has been on an upward slope most years since, rising significantly as each new manned space program was "ramping up."
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013 | By Jane Engle
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - I was inept at moonwalking. My rocket was a dud. And I crashed the space shuttle. Fortunately, I was just an astronaut wannabe and not the real deal. But it's as close as this middle-aged space geek is going to get. That geekiness, inspired by IMAX documentaries on space and news coverage of NASA's final shuttle launch in 2011, was what brought me to Adult Space Academy. The trip was a gift from my wife. The three-day program is among more than a dozen versions of Space Camp, which the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville created more than 30 years ago to give visitors a taste of what it's like to train as an astronaut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Back in 1950, Eiji Toyoda visited a Ford plant to learn how Americans made cars. The visit by a member of Japan's foremost manufacturing family changed the way Toyota Motor Corp. produced cars, altering the global auto industry. Toyoda, who is credited with developing the car company's efficient, low-defect manufacturing processes and who helped spearhead Toyota's aggressive push into the U.S. auto market, died Tuesday. He was 100. "Clearly Eiji was the person that laid the groundwork for what Toyota is today," said David Cole, former chairman of the nonprofit Center for Automotive Research.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Jay Jones, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
A good mentor is hard to find, but the students at Las Vegas Academy of the Arts have one in Stratosphere headliner Frankie Moreno, who showcases the talents of young musicians once a month. Next up: Maejoy Dotdot. Dotdot, who will be a sophomore at the academy this fall, will perform during Moreno 's 8 p.m. show Wednesday at Las Vegas Stratosphere Showroom. Dotdot, one of the students Moreno has coached during master classes he has taught at the high school, plays ukulele and sings.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2013 | By Carl Winder
LAS VEGAS -- When people ask Carlos Lucero what he does for a living, his answer often stops them in their tracks. “I throw people off the Stratosphere," he says jokingly. Lucero is the man who stands between a person taking the 855-foot plunge to the second level of the Stratosphere Hotel and Casino, or turning away from the controlled fall and taking the Walk of Shame back to the gift shop. Lucero is the Sky Master, the man who checks the harnesses and straps before thrill-seeking tourists endure the Sky Jump, a ride that opened here in April 2010 and, Lucero says, holds the Guinness World Record for highest commercial decelerator descent.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
If L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art were in the business of selling art instead of showcasing it for today's public and safekeeping it for tomorrow's, it would have reaped a windfall this week, because an important sector of its collection has just appreciated considerably. An unnamed buyer bid $40.4 million Wednesday at Christie's in New York for a huge 1957 untitled painting by the American abstract expressionist Franz Kline -- more than six times higher than had previously been paid at a public auction for a Kline painting until this week.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Jon Healey
According to David Keith , a physicist at Harvard, it's a fairly straightforward proposition to reduce the rate of warming on earth, and not all that expensive in the grand scheme of things. One possibility: fly a couple of customized corporate jets into the stratosphere every day and dump a lot of sulfur, creating thin clouds that reflect away some of the sunlight. "The hard questions here really aren't technical," Keith said Monday. "They're fundamentally political. " And the political questions about this sort of environmental manipulation, known in science circles as "geoengineering," are doozies.
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | SHAWN HUBLER
Bill Clinton had been around for breakfast and lunch and would be around again after dinner. The speaker of the Assembly had turned up twice in the course of two gigs. At the Beverly Hills mansion of the Franklin Mint's owner, Sen. Dianne Feinstein stood in the marble-floored foyer, planting a smooch on Nancy Sinatra's cheek. Kathleen Connell, the state controller, was shaking hands under a wall-sized gilt mirror. In the garden, California Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
With a short salute and a small step forward, Felix Baumgartner leapt from a capsule perched more than 24 miles above a barren New Mexico desert and landed safely, setting a world record for the highest sky dive. "Sometimes you have to go up really high to understand how small you are," Baumgartner said before stepping off a small ledge on the outside of a capsule lifted into the stratosphere by a helium-filled balloon. "I'm going home now. " Baumgartner, 43, hit speeds of nearly 834 mph, becoming the first free-falling human to crack the sound barrier.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Teetering 23 miles above the New Mexico desert, Felix Baumgartner plans to leap head first into the abyss and become the first free-falling human to break the sound barrier as he plummets to the ground. The feat, which will put his life on the line and push his body to the limit, is scheduled to take place shortly after dawn Monday when he falls from 120,000 feet in the air. JUMP DELAYED: The attempt by Felix Baumgartner to set the world's free-fall record at 23 miles has been postponed from Monday to Tuesday because of a cold front with gusty winds near Roswell, N.M. Wearing a newly designed pressurized suit and helmet, the Austria native will test the threshold of his equipment as scientists, aerospace engineers, the Air Force and NASA study what it shows about the limits and capabilities of the human body bailing out from aircraft at ultra-high altitudes.
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