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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspect who was tricked by an enterprising police detective into leaving his saliva on a soft drink straw at an Orange County Taco Bell pleaded guilty to two rape charges Monday in a case that even his lawyer said represented a legitimate yet unusual use of DNA evidence. Brea Police Det. Susan Hanna had been working on the case for months and thought Robert William Bradford Jr. was her man when she invited him out for a meal at Taco Bell, saying she wanted to pick his brain about the case.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
OXON HILL, Md.--For the second year in a row, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky won the presidential straw poll at the annual gathering of conservatives known as CPAC -- this year leading his closest rival by 20 points. The results were announced Saturday night as 2008 vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin closed out the Conservative Political Action Conference by arguing that an American "awakening" had begun due to the botched rollout of the President's healthcare law and what she called his "dopey wobbling on the world stage.
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OPINION
July 13, 1997
One could say that nicotine is the straw that broke the Camel's back! JIM HULGAN Azusa
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
DES MOINES - For more than 40 years, Iowa voters have played a vital role in picking the nation's president, culling the field of hopefuls and helping launch a fortunate handful all the way to the White House. For about 35 of those years, Iowa has been the target of jealousy and scorn, mainly from outsiders who say the state, the first to vote in the presidential contest, is too white and too rural; that its caucuses, precinct-level meetings of party faithful, are too quirky and too exclusionary to play such a key role in the nominating process.
SPORTS
February 22, 1992
After all that has been said and done regarding Magic Johnson, is it really necessary to erect a life-size monument at the Forum? As far as I'm concerned, this is the last straw. Please! Enough about Magic. MARTA G. TRUJILLO Torrance
SPORTS
August 24, 1985
I suggest the recent resurgence of the Dodgers in the last two months is largely due to the efforts of one man in the entire organization. Forgiving the blunders he has made in the past regarding Sutcliffe, Cey, Lopes and others, I strongly believe that Trader Al Campanis is really the straw that stirs the Dodger drink. The Cabell deal he made this year was a masterpiece of bartering. ROBIN KATZ Sepulveda
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Commerce Department said Monday that it has made a final determination that hats, caps and visors from China are being sold in the United States at less than fair-market value. As a result of the finding, cash deposits or bonds will be imposed on the imported head wear, which include items made from certain natural and man-made fibers but not hats made of straw, felt or wool.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Do chimpanzees have culture? It may depend on your definition of that slippery concept, but a new study using juice and soft straws shows that chimpanzees fill a basic requirement: They can learn new behaviors from one another. Many researchers argue that few species, and perhaps none besides our own, have the capacity for culture - learned behaviors to spread across a population and down through future generations. (For humans, the definition would include things like beliefs, aesthetics, moral codes and knowledge, but given that chimpanzees lack language and can't be asked about subjective thoughts, observable behaviors will have to do.)
NEWS
July 9, 1987
The first California Latino Fair opens Friday at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, featuring the music, culture, art and history of 10 Latin countries in addition to ethnic food and a carnival midway. The International Latin Culture Center, a 100-foot pavilion, will house displays, including arts and crafts, films and displays about such areas as industry, education, sports and entertainment, from Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Spain.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | RODNEY ANGOVE, Associated Press
The little factory south of town that converts rice wastes to electricity is a sweet deal for everyone. It relieves 21 rice mills of the expensive landfill disposal of rice hulls, and spares residents of the Sacramento Valley from the noxious smoke of rice straw burning in the fields. The Pacific Gas & Electric Co. gets power without the financial and environmental encumbrances. Electricity users may turn on their toasters without visions of oil sheiks or leaking tankers. Even the makers of concrete, ceramics, glass and computer chips welcome the burning rice's ash, which is also used to oxidize and solidify toxic waste spills.
SPORTS
September 30, 2013 | By Gary Klein
There was no singular moment. No play call that went awry or ill-advised timeout. No sideline blowup that prompted Athletic Director Pat Haden to fire Lane Kiffin as USC's football coach. Fans had been screaming for the coach's head for weeks and he paid no attention. But when his gut told him the Trojans weren't getting better and it was time to act, Haden didn't hesitate. Early Sunday, less than six hours after a lopsided loss to Arizona State in Tempe, Haden fired Kiffin during a meeting at Los Angeles International Airport.
SPORTS
September 18, 2013 | BILL PLASCHKE
The champagne is still on hold for at least another day, but the Dodgers bounced out of their clubhouse here Tuesday night happily soaked in a different sort of bubbly. There's nothing like being sprayed with a vintage Matt Kemp. One ball was smacked into the left-field corner. Another ball was blasted off the wall above the center-field fence. There was a line drive up the middle. There was a grounder past the shortstop. One moment Kemp was standing on second base, raising his hands into the air, pointing those hands at the Dodgers' dugout.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | David Lazarus
A lot of people are sick of the money-grubbing spat between Time Warner Cable and CBS, which has resulted in CBS, Showtime and other channels being unavailable to the cable company's subscribers since Aug. 2. For Alan Ehrlich, this was the last straw. He decided to cut the cable cord. More and more people are doing the same. The U.S. pay-TV industry lost about 316,000 subscribers in the 12-month period that ended June 30, according to Moffett Research. "Cord cutting used to be an urban myth," said analyst Craig Moffett.
WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - “Ding Jinhao was here.” It was a banal declaration scratched by a teenager at a 3,500-year-old Egyptian temple that has launched a round of soul-searching about bad behavior of Chinese tourists. The Chinese-language graffiti was discovered at Luxor this month by a Chinese tourist who posted a photograph on a microblog in which he deplored the conduct of his countrymen abroad. “I'm so embarrassed that I want to hide myself,” the microblogger wrote last week. Within days, Chinese had outed the vandal as a boy from Nanjing who had visited Egypt with his parents.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Senate will take up its first firearms measure since the Newtown, Conn., school shooting, after the Judiciary Committee approved a bill Thursday to combat gun trafficking. The proposal, steered by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.), the committee chairman, would impose strict penalties for buying a firearm for someone who cannot legally do so, an act known as a straw purchase. The bill would also toughen punishment for selling a gun to a person prohibited from owning one. "Law enforcement officials have consistently called for a firearms trafficking statute that can be effective to go after straw purchasers," Leahy said.
SCIENCE
February 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
It's been more than 30 years since UC Berkeley researchers first suggested that the extinction of the dinosaurs was probably linked to a massive comet or asteroid impact, known as Chicxulub, off the Yucatan coast. The idea was that the collision from space, which left a 110-mile-wide crater off the coast of Mexico, would have cast off debris that wrapped all the way around Earth, altering the climate and resulting in the global extinction. But that story hasn't passed muster everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1987
The envelope, please. And the winner for Biggest Grinch of the Year is . . . Don Shirley. After venting a seemingly inexhaustible supply of spleen on the pages of The Times' theater section for so long, his venomous criticisms are now infecting the TV pages. The last straw for me was his vicious attack on "Eye on the Sparrow" ("Sparrow: A Lack of Vision," Dec. 7). Does this man like anything? Does he like theater? Does he like television? Does he like himself? I hope Santa brought him a heart for Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A suspect who was tricked by an enterprising police detective into leaving his saliva on a soft drink straw at an Orange County Taco Bell pleaded guilty to two rape charges Monday in a case that even his lawyer said represented a legitimate yet unusual use of DNA evidence. Brea Police Det. Susan Hanna had been working on the case for months and thought Robert William Bradford Jr. was her man when she invited him out for a meal at Taco Bell, saying she wanted to pick his brain about the case.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Do chimpanzees have culture? It may depend on your definition of that slippery concept, but a new study using juice and soft straws shows that chimpanzees fill a basic requirement: They can learn new behaviors from one another. Many researchers argue that few species, and perhaps none besides our own, have the capacity for culture - learned behaviors to spread across a population and down through future generations. (For humans, the definition would include things like beliefs, aesthetics, moral codes and knowledge, but given that chimpanzees lack language and can't be asked about subjective thoughts, observable behaviors will have to do.)
NATIONAL
December 12, 2012 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
PHOENIX - A federal judge sentenced a Phoenix man Wednesday to nearly five years in prison for purchasing firearms for a Mexican drug cartel, triggering a chain of events that included the death of an elite Border Patrol agent and the unraveling of the failed federal gun-tracking operation called Fast and Furious. Jaime Avila Jr., 25, was a "straw purchaser" of the firearms for the cartel, and his purchases included two rifles found at the scene of the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian A. Terry, who was killed two years ago this week in the desert south of Tucson.
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