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July 20, 2011
On Black Sisters Street A Novel Chika Unigwe Random House: 254 pp., $25
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BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Andrea Chang
Talk of Silicon Valley losing steam was put on hold as two technology titans, Apple Inc. and Facebook Inc., tallied better-than-expected quarterly earnings and revenue. Apple's stock climbed more than 7% in after-hours trading after it reported that sales of iPhones blew past Wall Street's projections. Facebook's shares spiked 4% after it said ad revenue rose 82% year over year. Although many tech stocks slid in recent weeks, the robust financial results demonstrated that, at least for now, the underlying businesses of these two leading companies remain strong.
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TRAVEL
June 18, 1995
Californians would be amused if a major Canadian newspaper had an L.A. map with a main street spelled "La Siennaga," or a city called "La Hoya." So it was amusing to see a map of Toronto ("Mosaic Metropolis," June 4) with the main street spelled Younge instead of Yonge. ALBERT ROCKLIN Laguna Hills
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
The nation's largest motorcycle company has reported stronger-than-expected first-quarter results for 2014. Harley-Davidson Inc., which trades on the New York Stock Exchange as HOG, on Tuesday reported net income of $265.9 million against revenue of $1.73 billion, up from a 2013 first-quarter report of net income of $224.1 million against revenue of $1.57 billion. Among its strongest sellers?  The Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special and its new Breakout were the No. 1 and No. 2 top selling motorcycles in America for 2013, the company said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
A 72-year-old man was struck and killed while crossing a street in Santa Clarita on Wednesday, authorities said. Detectives with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department say the man was crossing Wiley Canyon Road east of Orchard Village Road shortly after 6 p.m. when he was hit by a minivan. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. His identity was not immediately released. Authorities said they did not believe alcohol played a factor in the incident and the driver of the minivan was not arrested.
SPORTS
September 23, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Mayor Eric Garcetti probably thought he would face no opposition when he threw his support behind an idea to rename a street near Dodger Stadium after Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully . Well, a dissenting voice has emerged. Scully's. At Scully's request, the Dodgers issued a statement Sunday night on his behalf pooh-poohing the idea. “The mayor of Los Angeles has a great deal more important things to do than name a street after me,” Scully said in the statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
You don't hear much about street photography anymore. There are lots of reasons why. One, hitherto unacknowledged, is that artist Ed Ruscha's extraordinary photo books turned the genre upside down in the 1960s. It hasn't been the same since. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article included a caption that identified the photograph as "untitled. " The photograph is titled "Los Angeles, California. " In the '60s, street photography's art world stature was peaking.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder causes children to act impulsively and become easily distracted. That's a problem when it comes to helping these children learn to cross streets safely, according to a study published Sunday in the journal Pediatrics . Researchers studied 78 children ages 7 to 10 who had ADHD and compared them with 39 children with normal development. The study found that kids with ADHD knew street-safety rules and appeared to try to cross streets appropriately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1985
Your editorial, "New Interest in Cityhood" (March 31) was right on target. You are correct when you state that there are issues to be considered other than street sweeping. The citizens of the affected area should consider this issue of cityhood very carefully. I am especially concerned by the fact that certain politicians seem to be pushing this issue. Undoubtedly, they will be looking for jobs for themselves and their friends if a city becomes a reality. The public should consider carefully just what services they really want and need, and also which are cost effective.
NEWS
July 10, 1994
Too often, alleys are thought of as dark and forbidding back streets, stifled by odor. But, really, they're just passageways, and the alleys of Melrose Avenue lead to a place that pulsates more from vibrant color than from shopping droves. Just look. Down these alleys are sights out of time and sites out of place. Exposed pipes scream orange against the industrial gray of a forbidden parking place. A lone lock secures a latch among a riot of hues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
On this warm Easter Sunday morning, New York street artist Jason Shelowitz (a.k.a. Jay Shells) is on the streets of Inglewood. He pulls over his rented silver Chevy at the bustling intersection of Imperial Highway and Western Avenue, hip-hop prattling on the car stereo. Then he grabs a step ladder from the back seat, adjusts his black “Rap” baseball cap and races across three lanes on foot. Now on the traffic island, cars whizzing by on both sides, he eyeballs a pole sporting a “One Way” street sign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
Hundreds of pet owners are expected to attend Saturday's 84th annual Blessing of the Animals in downtown Los Angeles. The event is "held in grateful recognition of the tremendous services given to the human race by the animal kingdom," church officials said. The free event takes place from noon to 5 p.m. on Olvera Street. The ceremony dates back to the 4th century, when San Antonio De Abad was named the patron saint of the animal kingdom and began to bless animals to promote good health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | Bloomberg News
Gene Estess, a broker who gave up the pay and perks of Wall Street for a second career helping New York City's homeless, has died. He was 78. He died April 9 at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y., according to his wife, Pat Schiff Estess. The cause was lung cancer, diagnosed about six months ago. Raised in Illinois on the Mississippi River, Estess found himself unable to ignore the inequality on the streets of New York. He remained interested in poverty and homelessness while living in the leafy suburb of Armonk in Westchester County and working as an options specialist at L.F. Rothschild & Co., an investment bank and brokerage firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
While Jon Hamm's "Mad Men" character Don Draper tends to bottle up his emotions, the actor Jon Hamm is very free with his -- so free he's helping "Sesame Street" explain a few emotions to its young audience.  With the help of the resident "Sesame Street" TV host, Murray, Hamm runs through "frustrated," "guilty" and "amazed. " Check it out in the video above. It's about time someone explained "amazed," honestly, given the word's frequency of use these days.  With "guilty," well, we're happy to see Hamm re-creating that one without the stereotypical celebrity mug shot accompaniment!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
There's something delightfully strange and counterintuitive about the way time operates in the opening chapters of Michael Lewis' new book, "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt. " Lewis describes a new kind of Wall Street gold rush. In the entirely automated, pre- and post-crash stock market of the first two decades of the 21st century, human traders have become superfluous. Stocks are bought and sold inside computers, and a new brand of high-frequency trader is making a fortune thanks to a precious new commodity - speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of April 13 - 19, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES Orphan Black In anticipation of next week's season premiere, series star Tatiana Maslany and others reflect on the first season of the sci-fi drama. 8 p.m. BBC America Ripper Street In the season finale, murdered corpses are discovered in a slum tenement and a boxing championship reveals vengeful feelings within the police force.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the second time in as many days, a piece of an aircraft fell out of the sky onto a New York street, officials said. Police in the Howard Beach neighborhood of Queens near John F. Kennedy International Airport said a resident found a 9-foot-long wing flap that had gouged an 1.5-inch depression in the street. The flap came from the right wing of TWA Flight 782, a Boeing 727, as it approached the airport from Orlando, Fla., Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Arlene Salac said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
On a soundstage in the heart of Hollywood this week, a chicken was giving directions to Mindy Kaling. The chicken, perched on the shoulder of "The Mindy Project" star, squawked off a couple of instructions to the crew, then muttered, "My mom would be so proud of me ... if she wasn't stew. " The chicken was located on the hand of director Joey Mazzarino, and it wasn't just any chicken. It was a "Sesame Street" Muppet chicken. PHOTOS: Families that changed TV   Although Sesame Street is an imaginary address, most people realize the TV show "Sesame Street" shoots in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
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